Single Letter

GEO/ADD/3/82/58

Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


58

recd- Sunday Morng 7th Novbr
1779
9 o'clock --
[1]

My dearest, dearest, dearest Sister, Friend, Miranda

      I saw my Mother again last Night, she
behaved rather kinder to me last Night than she did ye
preceeding but not as yet with her usual engaging
manner, however I think my conduct towards her
shd.. always be yt. of an affectionate & dutiful Child,
for I do not think it is becoming a Child to a certain
degree to judge of ye. behaviour of a Parent.
      As I have promised my Miranda to be perfectly open
with her, & as it is my wish always to be so, I shall begin
with telling her yt. I followed her advice in ------------going among
ye. Servants as seldom as poʃsible during ye. whole of my
Séjour, however I will be very honest with you. I think



might even have gone leʃs among ym- than I did late, wh..
however I will take care & correct for ye. future, not only
because you wish it, but because I know it is for my own
interest, and because it is much beneath me. I had very
little communication with ye. little Liar,[2] especially
none of ye. familiar kind, however I cld.. not prevent
something happening wh.. I had no sort of idea of,
but wh.. I will honestly relate to you as it happened,
be not too severe in yr. criticisms my Miranda upon
this occasion as I shall freely own it to you, consider
only my astonishment at ye. moment, my hesitation
at yte. ------instant what to do, what was ye. best answer
to make, whether I shd.. copy yr. behaviour upon
an occasion something similar, or whether I ʃhd..
be silent about it, I took ye. latter part thinking
that if I followed yr. example, he wld.. suppose you
had informed me of yr. conduct in yt. instance.
If I am ---wrong my Sister, correct me & shew me



where I am wrong as my tenderest & best friend as you really are.
The fact then plainly is this, going to send for some Lavender
Water I gave my orders to ye. little Liar, after Ihe had received
ym-, he asked my permiʃsion to say something to me at ye
other end of ye. Paʃsage, I asked him what it was or what
it cld.. be he had to say to me, he only reiterated his request,
upon which after haveing once more repeated my question
I went with him, he then said he had ye. greatest favor
in ye. World to ask of me, upon which I asked what it was
thinking it was some request or other he had to make to
------ which he wished me to interest myself in,
he only answered me by putting a seal into my hand,
& vanishing before I cld.. answer him desired me to
keep it for his sake, I have behaved him to since this
with more coolneʃs than I did before. This my
Miranda is ye. whole & sole of ye case, inform me
rather than correct me. As to mentioning yr. name
to him My Sister I call Heaven to witneʃs yt. I do not
to ye best of my recollection believe yt. even in my most



unguarded moments, since you gave me my last caution I
have ever mentioned yr. name to him, but most certain
am I & I wld.. not say it unleʃs I was perfectly so
yt. since you have been at W—— I am sure I never
have; & so fromfar from mentioning you to him, I have
purposely avoided making mention of any thing
yt. might bring yt. dear name in question. Be
not, I beseech you, be not for ye. future too credulous,
be not too hasty in lending an ear to every liye yt.
little deceitful Rascal
, or yt. designing Woman[3]
invent. Remember oh remember, My tenderest,
my dearest Friend, you caught ym- once before
in a falsehood formed about me. Pardon me, if I am
very warm upon this subject, as you can not but know
how much interested I am in it. I give you my word
& honor, wh.. I hope you ever will find very sacred
never to profane yr. name by mentioning it to yt. or



part of 58

any other such babbler. Never oh never doubt yr. Brother
in any instance, for ye future, you ever shall find him
act up to yt. Character. As to ye. reports you have had
heard concerning M. C——l & me, my Conduct may given
some foundation for ym- in ye. eyes of ye. attentive vulgar, but
nothing wh.. wld.. have struck wellbred people as any
thing particular one way or other, I never extended my
Civilities to her beyond what becomes any Man to any
Gentlewoman. As for M. H. I know nothing of her. I break-
=fasted
with her in Company with her B——r whom I know something of twice
at her Father's, you see how ye. World set Reports
about, one can not speak with ye. ʃmallest politeneʃs
to a Young Woman, but one is immediately supposed
to be in love with her, nay even to have an intrigue
with her. Now my dearest, dearest, dearest Friend
I hope I have cleared myʃelf from every imputation
in yr. eyes for I am sure it is ye principleal object
of my life, to appear in ye. most amiable lights poʃsible



in yr. eyes, & to appear in every instance be it ever
so trifling worthy of ye. name of Miranda's Bro=
=ther
. I admire Ye. Man of Feeling beyond what I
can expreʃs, as to marking beautiful paʃsages, it
is out of my power for there is not one wh.. has
escaped yr. delicate Pencil, what I mark with
croʃses as thus ❌ is merely to call ye attention, either
to Persons or things we are acquainted with.
Give Yr other Brother still more insight into
my Character, & tell him I esteem him for his
honesty & yt. I have as honest a heart as my
Miranda can wish. Ye first Part of this Letter was
written before I received yrs. & I am happy yt. it was for it will
more & more convince how thoroughly we coincide in all our ideas, &
certain sympathy reigns thrōout all our actions. Tell me my dearest
Sister, yt. you are content with my ingenuity in relating these facts to
you in yr next, but how else cld.. I have fullfilled my promise. One
self approving Moment whole hours surpaʃs of empty starers & of loud huzzas.
[4]
I send you W—— R——s Seal herewith give it to yr. Maid as a token of yr. esteem for
her, destroy it or do any thing upon earth with it, only if you have any love for me I beseech



2nd part of 58[5]

you never to let me see it again for I will
have nothing belonging to me that
can put me in mind of yt little
Fool
. God Bleʃs you & preserve
you My Miranda, & may you ever
be happy only recollect yt I shall
be unto my last Breath
                             Yr. ever affectionate Brother
                             Palemon toujours de même
P.S.
      Pray let me have another Letter
at my return. Adieu. toujours ------chére
Pardon my abominable scrawl & blotting
to my fear of being interrupted, encore
Ad. Ad. toujours fidel.



7 Novbr. 1779 recd-

2nd part of 58

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. The time appears to the left of the year. The order of writing of the various elements is uncertain.
 2. 'The little Liar' refers to William Ramus, Page of the Bedchamber, for whom see GEO/ADD/3/82/26 n.2.
 3. Possibly the same person called 'that infamous Woman' in GEO/ADD/3/82/29.
 4. It appears that this is a misquotation of Pope's Essay on Man, Epistle IV: “One self-approving hour whole years outweighs Of stupid starers, and of loud huzzas”. The poem is discussed and quoted by both George (GEO/ADD/3/82/20) and Mary (GEO/ADD/3/83/19, GEO/ADD/3/83/34).
 5. A pencil border around this line separates it from the content of the letter.

Normalised Text





My dearest, dearest, dearest Sister, Friend, Miranda

      I saw my Mother again last Night, she
behaved rather kinder to me last Night than she did the
preceding but not as yet with her usual engaging
manner, however I think my conduct towards her
should always be that of an affectionate & dutiful Child,
for I do not think it is becoming a Child to a certain
degree to judge of the behaviour of a Parent.
      As I have promised my Miranda to be perfectly open
with her, & as it is my wish always to be so, I shall begin
with telling her that I followed her advice in going among
the Servants as seldom as possible during the whole of my
Séjour, however I will be very honest with you. I think



might even have gone less among them than I did late, which
however I will take care & correct for the future, not only
because you wish it, but because I know it is for my own
interest, and because it is much beneath me. I had very
little communication with the little Liar, especially
none of the familiar kind, however I could not prevent
something happening which I had no sort of idea of,
but which I will honestly relate to you as it happened,
be not too severe in your criticisms my Miranda upon
this occasion as I shall freely own it to you, consider
only my astonishment at the moment, my hesitation
at the instant what to do, what was the best answer
to make, whether I should copy your behaviour upon
an occasion something similar, or whether I should
be silent about it, I took the latter part thinking
that if I followed your example, he would suppose you
had informed me of your conduct in that instance.
If I am wrong my Sister, correct me & show me



where I am wrong as my tenderest & best friend as you really are.
The fact then plainly is this, going to send for some Lavender
Water I gave my orders to the little Liar, after he had received
them, he asked my permission to say something to me at the
other end of the Passage, I asked him what it was or what
it could be he had to say to me, he only reiterated his request,
upon which after having once more repeated my question
I went with him, he then said he had the greatest favour
in the World to ask of me, upon which I asked what it was
thinking it was some request or other he had to make to
which he wished me to interest myself in,
he only answered me by putting a seal into my hand,
& vanishing before I could answer him desired me to
keep it for his sake, I have behaved him to since this
with more coolness than I did before. This my
Miranda is the whole & sole of the case, inform me
rather than correct me. As to mentioning your name
to him My Sister I call Heaven to witness that I do not
to the best of my recollection believe that even in my most



unguarded moments, since you gave me my last caution I
have ever mentioned your name to him, but most certain
am I & I would not say it unless I was perfectly so
that since you have been at W—— I am sure I never
have; & so far from mentioning you to him, I have
purposely avoided making mention of any thing
that might bring that dear name in question. Be
not, I beseech you, be not for the future too credulous,
be not too hasty in lending an ear to every lie that
little deceitful Rascal, or that designing Woman
invent. Remember oh remember, My tenderest,
my dearest Friend, you caught them once before
in a falsehood formed about me. Pardon me, if I am
very warm upon this subject, as you can not but know
how much interested I am in it. I give you my word
& honour, which I hope you ever will find very sacred
never to profane your name by mentioning it to that or




any other such babbler. Never oh never doubt your Brother
in any instance, for the future, you ever shall find him
act up to that Character. As to the reports you have
heard concerning Miss C——l & me, my Conduct may given
foundation for them in the eyes of the attentive vulgar, but
nothing which would have struck wellbred people as any
thing particular one way or other, I never extended my
Civilities to her beyond what becomes any Man to any
Gentlewoman. As for Miss H. I know nothing of her. I breakfasted
with her in Company with her Brother whom I know something of twice
at her Father's, you see how the World set Reports
about, one can not speak with the smallest politeness
to a Young Woman, but one is immediately supposed
to be in love with her, nay even to have an intrigue
with her. Now my dearest, dearest, dearest Friend
I hope I have cleared myself from every imputation
in your eyes for I am sure it is the principal object
of my life, to appear in the most amiable lights possible



in your eyes, & to appear in every instance be it ever
so trifling worthy of the name of Miranda's Brother
. I admire The Man of Feeling beyond what I
can express, as to marking beautiful passages, it
is out of my power for there is not one which has
escaped your delicate Pencil, what I mark with
crosses as thus ❌ is merely to call the attention, either
to Persons or things we are acquainted with.
Give Your other Brother still more insight into
my Character, & tell him I esteem him for his
honesty & that I have as honest a heart as my
Miranda can wish. The first Part of this Letter was
written before I received yours & I am happy that it was for it will
more & more convince how thoroughly we coincide in all our ideas, &
certain sympathy reigns throughout all our actions. Tell me my dearest
Sister, that you are content with my ingenuity in relating these facts to
you in your next, but how else could I have fulfilled my promise. One
self approving Moment whole hours surpass of empty starers & of loud huzzas.

I send you William Ramuss Seal herewith give it to your Maid as a token of your esteem for
her, destroy it or do any thing upon earth with it, only if you have any love for me I beseech




you never to let me see it again for I will
have nothing belonging to me that
can put me in mind of that little
Fool. God Bless you & preserve
you My Miranda, & may you ever
be happy only recollect that I shall
be unto my last Breath
                             Your ever affectionate Brother
                             Palemon toujours de même
P.S.
      Pray let me have another Letter
at my return. Adieu. toujours chére
Pardon my abominable scrawl & blotting
to my fear of being interrupted, encore
Adieu Adieu toujours fidel.




(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications, persons,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. The time appears to the left of the year. The order of writing of the various elements is uncertain.
 2. 'The little Liar' refers to William Ramus, Page of the Bedchamber, for whom see GEO/ADD/3/82/26 n.2.
 3. Possibly the same person called 'that infamous Woman' in GEO/ADD/3/82/29.
 4. It appears that this is a misquotation of Pope's Essay on Man, Epistle IV: “One self-approving hour whole years outweighs Of stupid starers, and of loud huzzas”. The poem is discussed and quoted by both George (GEO/ADD/3/82/20) and Mary (GEO/ADD/3/83/19, GEO/ADD/3/83/34).
 5. A pencil border around this line separates it from the content of the letter.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: Windsor Castle, The Royal Archives

Archive: GEO/ADD/3 Additional papers of George IV, as Prince, Regent, and King

Item title: Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: GEO/ADD/3/82/58

Correspondence Details

Author: George, Prince of Wales

Place sent: unknown

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 7 November 1779
notBefore 7 November 1779 (precision: medium)
notAfter 7 November 1779 (precision: high)

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton, on the Queen's attitude towards him; his interactions with the 'little liar' W. R.; and on reports concerning his conduct with M. C...l and M. H.
    The Prince states that he is following her advice to spend less time among the servants when at Windsor.
    Received Sunday morning at 9 o'clock.
    Signed 'Palemon'.
   

Length: 3 sheets, 1218 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Transcription and Research Assistant funding in 2018/19 provided by the Student Experience Internship programme of the University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Emma Donington Kiey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Emma Donington Kiey (submitted July 2019)

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 26 October 2020

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