Single Letter

GEO/ADD/3/82/10

Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text

[1]

10

3d. July 1779 Saturday


My dearest dearest dearest Friend,

      Not knowing whether I am to have the happi=
=neʃs
of meeting you this Evening, or not, at Windsor, I
aʃsume my Pen thus early in ye. morning (for it is now
--- just 5 o clock in ye morning) to aʃsure you how inexpreʃsible
my joy will be, if you inform me that I am to have that
pleasure; But if I am not to be so fortunate, I do
in ye. fairest manner declare to you, I shall not have
that ease, life, & content, which yr. presence always inspires
me with, during our ʃhort stay at Windsor. Whereever I am, you
need not fear, my ever forgetting you even for a moment, for
yr. dear image has so deeply imprinted itʃelf in my heart



that it will never be effaced out of it. I wish you to listen
to a word or two more only, before I conclude my Letter,
I wish you would take this toothpickcase, mind what
I say now, I do not say accept, asin an exchange for the
present you was so good as to send me a week or fortnight
ago, and which to my ʃhame be it said, I never have
as yet even thanked you for it, an& for *the World says wherever
any edged instrument is contained in a present made by
one friend to another, their friendʃhip does not subsist
long.[2] For as it is the object of my wishes that our
friendʃhip which now ʃtands upon the firmest grounds
should have an everlasting duration, I am desirous
that even such a trivial thing as *superstition ʃhould
not interfere with. I hope this trifling toothpickcase will not alarm yr.
delicacy, for as I am writing to my dearest Friend I
write solely & truly what are the sentiments of my heart.
Adieu my dearest, dearest, dearest Friend, & believe
                             that I shall ever be
                             yr. sincerely laffectionate & loving
                                                         Friend.
P.S. I have bid R ---E
carry you this and call soon after
for a little ʃhort answer which I entreat
you to favor me with. Adieu.[3]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. The image PDF of this letter has first and second page reversed.
 2. The Prince uses asterisks to indicate that this saying is the 'superstition' mentioned half a dozen lines below.
 3. This postscript appears to the left of the last 3 lines of the closing salutation.

Normalised Text





My dearest dearest dearest Friend,

      Not knowing whether I am to have the happiness
of meeting you this Evening, or not, at Windsor, I
assume my Pen thus early in the morning (for it is now
--- just 5 o'clock in the morning) to assure you how inexpressible
my joy will be, if you inform me that I am to have that
pleasure; But if I am not to be so fortunate, I do
in the fairest manner declare to you, I shall not have
that ease, life, & content, which your presence always inspires
me with, during our short stay at Windsor. Wherever I am, you
need not fear, my ever forgetting you even for a moment, for
your dear image has so deeply imprinted itself in my heart



that it will never be effaced out of it. I wish you to listen
to a word or two more only, before I conclude my Letter,
I wish you would take this toothpickcase, mind what
I say now, I do not say accept, in an exchange for the
present you was so good as to send me a week or fortnight
ago, and which to my shame be it said, I never have
as yet even thanked you for , & *the World says wherever
any edged instrument is contained in a present made by
one friend to another, their friendship does not subsist
long. For as it is the object of my wishes that our
friendship which now stands upon the firmest grounds
should have an everlasting duration, I am desirous
that even such a trivial thing as *superstition should
not interfere with. I hope this trifling toothpickcase will not alarm your
delicacy, for as I am writing to my dearest Friend I
write solely & truly what are the sentiments of my heart.
Adieu my dearest, dearest, dearest Friend, & believe
                             that I shall ever be
                             your sincerely affectionate & loving
                                                         Friend.
P.S. I have bid R E
carry you this and call soon after
for a little short answer which I entreat
you to favour me with. Adieu.

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. The image PDF of this letter has first and second page reversed.
 2. The Prince uses asterisks to indicate that this saying is the 'superstition' mentioned half a dozen lines below.
 3. This postscript appears to the left of the last 3 lines of the closing salutation.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: Windsor Castle, The Royal Archives

Archive: GEO/ADD/3 Additional papers of George IV, as Prince, Regent, and King

Item title: Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: GEO/ADD/3/82/10

Correspondence Details

Author: George, Prince of Wales

Place sent: Windsor

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: c.3 July 1779
notBefore 2 July 1779 (precision: high)
notAfter 3 July 1779 (precision: high)

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton, on whether he will see her that evening at Windsor, and on exchanging gifts. The Prince gives Hamilton a toothpick case, and refers to her presents to him.
    He states that he hasn't thanked her for them because 'the World says whenever any edged instrument is contained in a present made by one friend to another, their friendship does not subsist long'. In postscript the Prince writes that he has 'bid R[?] carry you this...'.
    Written Saturday, at 5 o'clock in the morning.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 349 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Transcription and Research Assistant funding in 2018/19 provided by the Student Experience Internship programme of the University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Emma Donington Kiey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Emma Donington Kiey (submitted June 2019)

Cataloguer: , Archivist, The Royal Archives

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 18 May 2020

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