Single Letter

GEO/ADD/3/82/14

Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


14

                             1st.[1]

22d. July 1779
Thursday Morng.


      My dearest dearest dearest Friend,

      After ye promise I made of accounting for my conduct
especially in some particular instances which may perhaps have
struck you most, I now take up my Pen to unburden my whole Soul
to you.
      As to the petites attentions I may have lately shewn
one person, and which ʃhocked another person so much ye last Evening
we were together, I do aʃsure you as my friend they are not founded
upon any Penchant I might in particular have, but upon an old
joke which I explained to you at the time. Alas, my sweetest
Friend you are but too well acquainted, I say you are but too
well acquainted with the amiable object, on whom my whole
love, affection, and esteem centers, upon whom my whole happineʃs



                             2d..

depends, and for whom I burn with ye. most vivid flame. Let
me not say that my paʃsion for this amiable object hads degenerated, if I instead of love
treating her with that violence of paʃsion, which I must ever feel,
I now treat her with that truly fraternal & tender affection, and that esteem
with which it becomes me to treat my dearest and firmest friend.
Such my ever amiable friend is the present situation of my
heart, search ever[y] inward corner of it, and look if there is a
secret, in the least more interesting which I have not told imparted to you
ask any questions of me I am ready prepared to answer every thing
concerning which you may poʃsibly enquire. When I gave that
ever dear kind, & obliging friend a Paper thnot long ago which
contained two verses, the verse of the last of which was,
je suivrai partout vos liens, I really meant what I said.
for had she hadnot made me a certain promise which I think
best not to mention as you well know, my intention really
was, not to have survived her loʃs a single instant, be it
in life or death, je suivrai partout ses liens. Continue



                             3d..

my dearest ever amiable and kind friend, to treat me with
that open friendship, generosity of heart, and nobleneʃs
of mind which are innate in you, I conjure you, if not totally
to heal, at least to alleviate the pains I felel. Write me
an Answer if it is not inconvenient to you, which I entreat of you not to make too short,
blame me where I am worthy of it, and commend me
where I am worthy of praise. As we are now upon so free---
and disinterested a conduct, will my ever dearest friend,
excuse me if I say; I think you rather too apt to allow
the gloomy ʃhades of melancholy, to sieze too ʃtrong poʃseʃsion
of you, to let them prey too much upon yr. tender heart,
to let them dwell too much in yr. ʃpotleʃs mind, which
lets itself too easily be perceived throughout the whole
of yr. delicate frame. Was I to think that I was
cause of any part of that melancholy, I would immediately[2]
abscond where no one should ever hear of me again, were not
I sensible, do I flatter myself, tell me I beseech of you,



                             4th..

that it would rather increase than diminish yr. grief to hear
that him who was ever, is and ever shall be attached to you,
was no more. I very much admire the first Epistle of
the Eʃsay on man, which which you recommended to me
read from ye beginning to ye end over again. I admire
the beginning very much, as well as those tender lines
concerning which the innocent little lamb, whilst I
was reading them, & indeed the whole Epistle, I could
not help sighing to think how many great and wonderful
bleʃsings the Almighty has heaped upon Mankind, &
how unworthy we are all of us of them. I have now
to add what interests me most, that is my sweetest,
dearest, and best of friends, to entreat of you the continuance of that
disinterested affection and friendship with which you
have treated me all along, and which I shall cher
cherish to the end of my life, you will I am sure
have generosity enough I am sure I repeat it to grant my
request, as you must be sensible than in my situation



                             5th..

in life I shall not have many even worldly friends, and not
one so open, generous, sympathizing as yourself, which alone must
render you dearer to me than the rest of the World together
Adieu my dearest, dearest, dearest Friend believe me
when I call you tout ce qui m'est chère au monde, these
are the never alterable sentiments of him whose greatest happineʃs
it will be to sign himself throughout ye whole of
his life.
Yr. ever sincerely affectionate Friend.

      P.S.
      I have forgot to make that request I told you I would make to you
that is to send me a lock of yr. hair envelopped in yr. answer, with which
I will immediately have something made to correspond with toujours de même[3]
I shall keep it in yr. absence as the representative of my dear friend & love
it accordingly. write whenever only it is convenient to yourself, & tell me
whether you hear that you are to make another sejour at - soon or not.
Excuse my writing & the separate sheets I write upon as I am in an
amazing hurry. Adieu pour la seconde fois.
                             tout ce qui m'est chère au monde.
The Carrier of this must call ------ for
an answer at what time you settle with him. Adieu encore pour la troisième fois
                                                         tout ce qui m'est chère
                                                         au monde.


[4]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. The sequence of pages indicated at the top of each sheet has been followed in the transcription. The images have the order 1, 4, 2, 3, 5.
 2. The sequence of correction at the beginning of this word is not clear.
 3. This frequently-employed effusion and another characteristic French phrase near the foot of the page are linked by crosses in the text.
 4. This page is blank.

Normalised Text



                            



      My dearest dearest dearest Friend,

      After the promise I made of accounting for my conduct
especially in some particular instances which may perhaps have
struck you most, I now take up my Pen to unburden my whole Soul
to you.
      As to the petites attentions I may have lately shown
one person, and which shocked another person so much the last Evening
we were together, I do assure you as my friend they are not founded
upon any Penchant I might in particular have, but upon an old
joke which I explained to you at the time. Alas, my sweetest
Friend you are but too well acquainted, I say you are but too
well acquainted with the amiable object, on whom my whole
love, affection, and esteem centres, upon whom my whole happiness



                            

depends, and for whom I burn with the most vivid flame. Let
me not say that my passion for this amiable object has degenerated, if I instead of
treating her with that violence of passion, which I must ever feel,
I now treat her with that truly fraternal & tender affection, and that esteem
with which it becomes me to treat my dearest and firmest friend.
Such my ever amiable friend is the present situation of my
heart, search every inward corner of it, and look if there is a
secret, in the least more interesting which I have not imparted to you
ask any questions of me I am ready prepared to answer every thing
concerning which you may possibly enquire. When I gave that
ever dear kind, & obliging friend a Paper not long ago which
contained two verses, the verse of the last of which was,
je suivrai partout vos liens, I really meant what I said.
for had she not made me a certain promise which I think
best not to mention as you well know, my intention really
was, not to have survived her loss a single instant, be it
in life or death, je suivrai partout ses liens. Continue



                            

my dearest ever amiable and kind friend, to treat me with
that open friendship, generosity of heart, and nobleness
of mind which are innate in you, I conjure you, if not totally
to heal, at least to alleviate the pains I feel. Write me
an Answer if it is not inconvenient to you, which I entreat of you not to make too short,
blame me where I am worthy of it, and commend me
where I am worthy of praise. As we are now upon so free
and disinterested a conduct, will my ever dearest friend,
excuse me if I say; I think you rather too apt to allow
the gloomy shades of melancholy, to seize too strong possession
of you, to let them prey too much upon your tender heart,
to let them dwell too much in your spotless mind, which
lets itself too easily be perceived throughout the whole
of your delicate frame. Was I to think that I was
cause of any part of that melancholy, I would immediately
abscond where no one should ever hear of me again, were not
I sensible, do I flatter myself, tell me I beseech of you,



                            

that it would rather increase than diminish your grief to hear
that him who was ever, is and ever shall be attached to you,
was no more. I very much admire the first Epistle of
the Essay on man, which you recommended to me
read from the beginning to the end over again. I admire
the beginning very much, as well as those tender lines
concerning the innocent little lamb, whilst I
was reading them, & indeed the whole Epistle, I could
not help sighing to think how many great and wonderful
blessings the Almighty has heaped upon Mankind, &
how unworthy we are all of us of them. I have now
to add what interests me most, that is my sweetest,
dearest, and best of friends, to entreat of you the continuance of that
disinterested affection and friendship with which you
have treated me all along, and which I shall
cherish to the end of my life, you will I am sure
have generosity enough I am sure I repeat it to grant my
request, as you must be sensible that in my situation



                            

in life I shall not have many even worldly friends, and not
one so open, generous, sympathizing as yourself, which alone must
render you dearer to me than the rest of the World together
Adieu my dearest, dearest, dearest Friend believe me
when I call you tout ce qui m'est chère au monde, these
are the never alterable sentiments of him whose greatest happiness
it will be to sign himself throughout the whole of
his life.
Your ever sincerely affectionate Friend.

      P.S.
      I have forgot to make that request I told you I would make to you
that is to send me a lock of your hair enveloped in your answer, with which
I will immediately have something made to correspond with toujours de même
I shall keep it in your absence as the representative of my dear friend & love
it accordingly. write whenever only it is convenient to yourself, & tell me
whether you hear that you are to make another sejour at - soon or not.
Excuse my writing & the separate sheets I write upon as I am in an
amazing hurry. Adieu pour la seconde fois.
                             tout ce qui m'est chère au monde.
The Carrier of this must call for
an answer at what time you settle with him. Adieu encore pour la troisième fois
                                                         tout ce qui m'est chère
                                                         au monde.


(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. The sequence of pages indicated at the top of each sheet has been followed in the transcription. The images have the order 1, 4, 2, 3, 5.
 2. The sequence of correction at the beginning of this word is not clear.
 3. This frequently-employed effusion and another characteristic French phrase near the foot of the page are linked by crosses in the text.
 4. This page is blank.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: Windsor Castle, The Royal Archives

Archive: GEO/ADD/3 Additional papers of George IV, as Prince, Regent, and King

Item title: Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: GEO/ADD/3/82/14

Correspondence Details

Author: George, Prince of Wales

Place sent: unknown

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: c.22 July 1779
notBefore 21 July 1779 (precision: medium)
notAfter 22 July 1779 (precision: high)

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton, on accounting for his conduct, his affection for her, and reflections on the first epistle of the 'Essay on man' by Alexander Pope.
    Regarding his conduct, the Prince states that 'as to the petites attentions I may have lately shewn one person, and which shocked another person so much [the] last evening we were together, I do assure you as my friend they are not founded upon any penchant I might in particular have, but upon an old joke which I explained to you at the time'.
    He states that 'let me not say that my passion for the amiable object has degenerated, if instead of treating her with that violence of passion, which I must ever feel, I now treat her with that truly fraternal & tender affection'.
    Written Thursday Morning.
   

Length: 3 sheets, 945 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Transcription and Research Assistant funding in 2018/19 provided by the Student Experience Internship programme of the University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Emma Donington Kiey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Emma Donington Kiey (submitted June 2019)

Cataloguer: , Archivist, The Royal Archives

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 19 May 2020

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