Single Letter

GEO/ADD/3/82/16

Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton, and draft note from Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


                                                         16
                                                         typed
                             25th. July 1779

      My dearest dearest dearest friend,[1]

      I have now but a moment, therefore
I will say what little I can to you now the rest
must be deferred till 5 o clock tomorrow Morning.
I have not forgot the situation Providence has
placed me in, I can not help however help lamenting
that I am of such rank as to prevent at least
for ye present, my being united to her, whom
alone I can love. I should look upon myself as
the most execrable wretch upon ye face of ye
Earth, if I was wanting in ye smallest tittle
to ye best of Parents, I would not be ye cause
of a moment's unhappineʃs to them for all the Earth
poʃseʃses. Impetuosity, ardor, no word is too
ʃtrong for my present sentiments. I see Beauty
Person, accomplishments, every thing in ʃhort



in you that could make my life happy. But after
tomorrow I will forever close my lips upon
that subject whatever my feelings may be
as it seems to be disagreable to you. Disgraceful
tdo you call it for me to feel such sentiments
for you, I look upon it as ye glory of my life.
      I conjure you by all that's sacred to explain
yrself what you mean when you say whatever
appearance things may carry with them, or
however affairs may turn out you ------will act up
to ye character of my friend. ever dear
ever precious name. You drive me to distraction,
think not I conjure you of ever going, if you
do at present, you will drive me notwith=
=standing
all ye. strong principles of
Religion I have had instilled into me, from



my earliest Childhood, to commit some horrid
attempt upon myself, if hereafter you go & retire abroad I
will leave my Country, Parents, family
in short every thing that ought to be
dear to me on Earth, merely to follow
you in order to have ye happineʃs of seeing
her to whom I am so firmly attached. But
after tomorrow I again declare, I will never
for ye. future open my lips to you upon
that subject. Excuse I entreat of
you the violence of my terms, it is upon a
so mucha subject too much connected with my happineʃs
for mye to speak otherwise upon it. You
will ever be my friend, & I hope you
never will find any reason to think me
otherwise than yrs. Adieu
My dearest, dearest, dearest Friend.
      P.S. Excuse my writing for I am in prodigious hast, as well as ye
                                                         stile.


[2]
26 July 1779

I will not go at present, ask
no further explanation
I am your friend & as such
shall adopt every proper method
to keep up to that character --
Your honor is dear to me as my
own, therefore I shall in
whatever I do be guided by that
consideration & that consideration
will lead me to make every
proper sacrifice.

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Extracts from this letter appear in Anson & Anson (1925: 76-7).
 2. Hamilton has used the blank last sheet to draft her response to GEO/ADD/3/82/17 of 26 July (which had no blank space); the sheet is lightly scrawled over in ink so as to leave the content readable. The Prince reacts to Hamilton's opening sentence in GEO/ADD/3/82/18.

Normalised Text


                                                        
                                                        
                            

      My dearest dearest dearest friend,

      I have now but a moment, therefore
I will say what little I can to you now the rest
must be deferred till 5 o'clock tomorrow Morning.
I have not forgot the situation Providence has
placed me in, I can not however help lamenting
that I am of such rank as to prevent at least
for the present, my being united to her, whom
alone I can love. I should look upon myself as
the most execrable wretch upon the face of the
Earth, if I was wanting in the smallest tittle
to the best of Parents, I would not be the cause
of a moment's unhappiness to them for all the Earth
possesses. Impetuosity, ardour, no word is too
strong for my present sentiments. I see Beauty
Person, accomplishments, every thing in short



in you that could make my life happy. But after
tomorrow I will forever close my lips upon
that subject whatever my feelings may be
as it seems to be disagreeable to you. Disgraceful
do you call it for me to feel such sentiments
for you, I look upon it as the glory of my life.
      I conjure you by all that's sacred to explain
yourself what you mean when you say whatever
appearance things may carry with them, or
however affairs may turn out you will act up
to the character of my friend. ever dear
ever precious name. You drive me to distraction,
think not I conjure you of ever going, if you
do at present, you will drive me notwithstanding
all the strong principles of
Religion I have had instilled into me, from



my earliest Childhood, to commit some horrid
attempt upon myself, if hereafter you go & retire abroad I
will leave my Country, Parents, family
in short every thing that ought to be
dear to me on Earth, merely to follow
you in order to have the happiness of seeing
her to whom I am so firmly attached. But
after tomorrow I again declare, I will never
for the future open my lips to you upon
that subject. Excuse I entreat of
you the violence of my terms, it is upon a
a subject too much connected with my happiness
for me to speak otherwise upon it. You
will ever be my friend, & I hope you
never will find any reason to think me
otherwise than yours. Adieu
My dearest, dearest, dearest Friend.
      P.S. Excuse my writing for I am in prodigious haste, as well as the
                                                         stile.



26 July 1779

I will not go at present, ask
no further explanation
I am your friend & as such
shall adopt every proper method
to keep up to that character --
Your honour is dear to me as my
own, therefore I shall in
whatever I do be guided by that
consideration & that consideration
will lead me to make every
proper sacrifice.

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Extracts from this letter appear in Anson & Anson (1925: 76-7).
 2. Hamilton has used the blank last sheet to draft her response to GEO/ADD/3/82/17 of 26 July (which had no blank space); the sheet is lightly scrawled over in ink so as to leave the content readable. The Prince reacts to Hamilton's opening sentence in GEO/ADD/3/82/18.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: Windsor Castle, The Royal Archives

Archive: GEO/ADD/3 Additional papers of George IV, as Prince, Regent, and King

Item title: Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton, and draft note from Hamilton

Shelfmark: GEO/ADD/3/82/16

Correspondence Details

Author: George, Prince of Wales

Place sent: unknown

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: c. 25 July 1779
notBefore 24 July 1779 (precision: medium)
notAfter 25 July 1779 (precision: high)

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton, regretting that his rank does not allow him [to marry Hamilton].
    The Prince vows to speak no more on the subject of his affections for Hamilton, and suggests that if she leaves he will 'commit some horrid attempt upon myself', or follow Hamilton abroad.
    A section dated 26 July 1779 has been crossed out, almost certainly a draft response by Hamilton.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 486 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Transcription and Research Assistant funding in 2018/19 provided by the Student Experience Internship programme of the University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Emma Donington Kiey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Emma Donington Kiey (submitted June 2019)

Cataloguer: , Archivist, The Royal Archives

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 20 May 2020

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