Single Letter

GEO/ADD/3/82/46

Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


46

10th- Octbr. 1779
Sunday Morng.

My dearest dearest, dearest Sister Friend,

      Excuse ye. shortneʃs of this
Billet at present you shall have
a longer tomorrow morning for I shall
rise betimes in order to satisfy my own
impatience & curiosity in writing
to you as well as my happineʃs, for I have
frequently told you yt.. I know
no greater pleasure if I can not
converse with you in person, than
writing to you.
      I send you with this Note
with a little piece of Galanterie
of ye. ------'smy mother's[1] to me, she saw ye.



other Morning when she was in Town
among some other things that were
brought her to see a Waistcoat whh..
thinking exceedingly pretty she
bought & gave me, she has promis'd
my Brother ye. fellow to it, such
little marks of attention are worth
ten thousand times more than
ye most magnificent presents
that are given in a leʃs affectionate
manner. I send you also two
paterns of Velvets chuse pray I beg of
you ye one you like best for me



I intend to make ye. Coat up
quite plain except Parments[2]
which I intend to have worked
similar to ye waistcoat, ye
whole to be new for my dear
little A-a's Birth Day[3]
I find I can not properly have
ye. Poplin lined with Ermine
at this Season of ye. year, as it
is not as yet far enough advanced
in ye. Winter, I was not as
yet facquainted with such minutiæ
till having consulted my Taylor



he informed me of it.
      I hope to be able to send
you back yr. Letters tomorrow,
with some few remarks upon
ym... Pardon my scrawl
for I am in great hast, Adieu
Adieu, Adieu, dearest, dearest
dearest Miranda, Sister, Friend
May you ever enjoy every bleʃsing
yt.. Heaven & Earth can
afford is ye. constant Prayer
of yr.
      ever affectionate Brother
                             Palemon.
                                                         toujours de même
P.S.[4]
My Meʃsenger shall bring back ye. Waistcoat tomorrow
& ye. other Paterns pray give me yr. opinion of ym
all, & put a Pin in ye. one you chuse.[5] Adieu. A. A. toujours
                                                         chére.

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. It is likely that the original wording was of ye. Queen's to me, though the cancellation is too heavy for certainty.
 2. 'An ornament or decoration [...]' (OED s.v. parament n. 2).
 3. The sixth birthday of Princess Augusta would fall on 8 November.
 4. The 'P.S.' of the postscript appears to the left of the French salutation.
 5. This sentence is excerpted in Anson & Anson (1925: 87).

Normalised Text




My dearest dearest, dearest Sister Friend,

      Excuse the shortness of this
Billet at present you shall have
a longer tomorrow morning for I shall
rise betimes in order to satisfy my own
impatience & curiosity in writing
to you as well as my happiness, for I have
frequently told you that I know
no greater pleasure if I can not
converse with you in person, than
writing to you.
      I send you with this Note
a little piece of Galanterie
of my mother's to me, she saw the



other Morning when she was in Town
among some other things that were
brought her to see a Waistcoat which
thinking exceedingly pretty she
bought & gave me, she has promis'd
my Brother the fellow to it, such
little marks of attention are worth
ten thousand times more than
the most magnificent presents
that are given in a less affectionate
manner. I send you also two
patterns of Velvets choose I beg of
you the one you like best for me



I intend to make the Coat up
quite plain except Paraments
which I intend to have worked
similar to the waistcoat, the
whole to be new for my dear
little Augusta's Birth Day
I find I can not properly have
the Poplin lined with Ermine
at this Season of the year, as it
is not as yet far enough advanced
in the Winter, I was not as
yet acquainted with such minutiæ
till having consulted my Tailor



he informed me of it.
      I hope to be able to send
you back your Letters tomorrow,
with some few remarks upon
them. Pardon my scrawl
for I am in great haste, Adieu
Adieu, Adieu, dearest, dearest
dearest Miranda, Sister, Friend
May you ever enjoy every blessing
that Heaven & Earth can
afford is the constant Prayer
of your
      ever affectionate Brother
                             Palemon.
                                                         toujours de même
P.S.
My Messenger shall bring back the Waistcoat tomorrow
& the other Patterns pray give me your opinion of them
all, & put a Pin in the one you choose. Adieu. Adieu Adieu toujours
                                                         chére.

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. It is likely that the original wording was of ye. Queen's to me, though the cancellation is too heavy for certainty.
 2. 'An ornament or decoration [...]' (OED s.v. parament n. 2).
 3. The sixth birthday of Princess Augusta would fall on 8 November.
 4. The 'P.S.' of the postscript appears to the left of the French salutation.
 5. This sentence is excerpted in Anson & Anson (1925: 87).

Metadata

Library References

Repository: Windsor Castle, The Royal Archives

Archive: GEO/ADD/3 Additional papers of George IV, as Prince, Regent, and King

Item title: Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: GEO/ADD/3/82/46

Correspondence Details

Author: George, Prince of Wales

Place sent: unknown

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 9 October 1779
notBefore 9 October 1779 (precision: medium)
notAfter 9 October 1779 (precision: low)

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton, on the gift of a waistcoat from the Queen to the Prince; and on sending Hamilton two patterns [for a coat] to choose from.
    The Prince writes that these 'little marks of attention are worth ten thousand times more than the most magnificent presents that are given in a less affectionate manner'. He discusses fabric for the coat, remarking that it is the wrong season of the year for 'Poplin lined with Ermine'. The coat is to be worn at Princess Augusta's birthday.
    Written Sunday morning.
    Signed 'Palemon'.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 346 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Transcription and Research Assistant funding in 2018/19 provided by the Student Experience Internship programme of the University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Emma Donington Kiey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Emma Donington Kiey (submitted December 2019)

Cataloguer: , Archivist, The Royal Archives

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 22 May 2020

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