Single Letter

GEO/ADD/3/82/69

Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text



69

recd. Satry- Morng 27th-
Novbr- 1779

Friday Night in answer to Thursday Night.
Again my ever dearest Miranda
indeed every time I write to you, I can
not write you longer Letters, however
I hope neceʃsity will plead my excuse especially as
you know my inclination. Oh! how
wretched am I to hear yt. my Comforter
my bosom Friend, my dearest Miranda,
is so ill, take care of yrself for me,
consider me, consider my situation,
consider what it wld.. be were I --
Heaven curse ye. thought I cld: not
bear it, thou art dearer, dearer
dearer to me than a thousand Worlds.
Tell me in yr. next how you are
whether or no you have seen Dr.. T-
according to yt. promise, if you have



not, you will see him immediately for
my sake, unleʃs you find yrself greatly
better. What wld.. you have said had
you known yt. I who am but this
very day perfectly recovered of cold
was obliged to ride with my F-
to Barnet to See ye. East Yorkshire
Melitia & was out all ye. time
wet thro' to ye. skin in ye. cold
Wind wh.. was very high, ye snow
& rain tillfrom 9 till 1. I thought
of yr. tender care for me my Sister
all ye.
worse yt. I think I am rather
ye. better for it. My ------ not
knowing exactly what time to call this
Evening I ordered him not to call till



ye. Morning notwithstanding my impatience
to be informed of ye. state of yr health.
Adieu, Adieu, Adieu. God bleʃs you
& preserve you, & believe me ever
      thy tenderest Brother & friend
      Thy Palemon
toujours de même

      P.S. I hope you found what I sent you good
& I hope you will find it soften ye. pain
you must feel in yr. breast by coughing
I understand L-d S-t[1] cut a wonderful
great figure yesterday. Encore une fois
préservez vôtre chére santé pour moi
A. A. A.
toujours chére.

                             Ton P..



[2]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. This is probably Lord Stormont.
 2. Page 4 is left blank.

Normalised Text






Again my ever dearest Miranda
indeed every time I write to you, I can
not write you longer Letters, however
I hope necessity will plead my excuse especially as
you know my inclination. Oh! how
wretched am I to hear that my Comforter
my bosom Friend, my dearest Miranda,
is so ill, take care of yourself for me,
consider me, consider my situation,
consider what it would be were I --
Heaven curse the thought I could not
bear it, thou art dearer, dearer
dearer to me than a thousand Worlds.
Tell me in your next how you are
whether or no you have seen Dr.. Turton
according to that promise, if you have



not, you will see him immediately for
my sake, unless you find yourself greatly
better. What would you have said had
you known that I who am but this
very day perfectly recovered of cold
was obliged to ride with my Father
to Barnet to See the East Yorkshire
Militia& was out all the time
wet through to the skin in the cold
Wind which was very high, the snow
& rain from 9 till 1. I thought
of your tender care for me my Sister
all time I was out, however thank
God I am so far from being the

worse that I think I am rather
the better for it. My not
knowing exactly what time to call this
Evening I ordered him not to call till



the Morning notwithstanding my impatience
to be informed of the state of your health.
Adieu, Adieu, Adieu. God bless you
& preserve you, & believe me ever
      thy tenderest Brother & friend
      Thy Palemon
toujours de même

      P.S. I hope you found what I sent you good
& I hope you will find it soften the pain
you must feel in your breast by coughing
I understand Lord S-t cut a wonderful
great figure yesterday. Encore une fois
préservez vôtre chére santé pour moi
Adieu Adieu Adieu
toujours chére.

                             Ton Palemon.



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quotations,
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 1. This is probably Lord Stormont.
 2. Page 4 is left blank.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: Windsor Castle, The Royal Archives

Archive: GEO/ADD/3 Additional papers of George IV, as Prince, Regent, and King

Item title: Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: GEO/ADD/3/82/69

Correspondence Details

Author: George, Prince of Wales

Place sent: unknown

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 26 November 1779

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton, on her ill health; and on the Prince riding with the King to Barnet to inspect the East Yorkshire Militia
    Written Friday night in answer to Thursday night. Received Saturday morning.
    Signed 'P'.
    In postscript the Prince writes that he hopes [the medicines] he has sent Hamilton will ease the pain caused by her coughing.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 333 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: Transcription and XML version created as part of project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers', funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council under grant AH/S007121/1.

Transliterator: David Denison (submitted February 2020)

Cataloguer: , Archivist, The Royal Archives

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 20 May 2020

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