Single Letter

GEO/ADD/3/83/30

Letter from Mary Hamilton, to George, Prince of Wales

Diplomatic Text


30

30

                             Wrote Sunday sent Tuesday ½ past 9 oClock
                                                         7th Decbr- 1779

My Friend

I sat down immediately to write an answer to yours --
the subject I own embarraʃses me but I will endeavour
wth. ye. utmost candorur u to give my sentiments. -- You have
not at all surprised me by ye. declaration -- you have
pleas'd me by your confidence -- you have hurt me
by your caution -- you have in some measure afflicted
me by proving yt your character will turn out what I
apprehended. -- Now my dear friend wth. respect to
ye. present object of your paʃsion & fancy -- I know not
what to say -- let me however take ye. liberty of sayingpointing
out that a female in yt. line has too much trick &
art not be a very dangerous object -- I do not reprove
You for having fix'd your affections -- for you will telltell
me -- beauty is aimiable as well as interesting -- how
was it poʃsible then for my young friend to steel
his heart against ye. united forces of Beauty & innocence
when under (even ye. mock) appearance of distreʃs --
& likewise when yt. beauty & innocence cld- for his sake
& to attract his regard, condescend to use ye. common
little arts of her sex & profeʃsion to captivate & fix



a heart so much worth her while to conquer --
-- You desire me to “comfort” you -- what need can
you poʃsibly have for comfort -- I do not mean
to make you vain or presumptuous -- but I think
you may endulge ye. pleasing certainty that ye-
lady is so much in love returns your affectionlove ##[1]
-- You desire me to “pardon” you -- for what? have
you been to blame !? -- is not your fault an
involuntary one? -- You desire me to “pity” you
Can I refuse my pity to a person in your
unhappy situation -- that wld. be cruel indeed --
-- -- -- You say “Heaven knows when this paʃsion
will be extinguish'd” -- tho I think Heaven has nothing tdo do --
in ye- affair -- yet I cannot imagine why my friend
shld. be at all solicitous to extinguish a flame so pure --
refin'd -- & honorable. -- I wd. ad-vise you however to be ------------ a little
upon yor. guard -- & not plunge yourself into misfortunes heedleʃsly. There is no irony in this
Adieu let me have your confidence -- I am &
Ever will be your friend -- & as long as you chuse
to allow it will expreʃs it. Adieu Adieu
Adieu.
I own my curiosity is rais'd to know why yo. find less time for
writing in G- than in ye. C- are not yor. occupations ye. same? do not
suppose I mean to lay a tax upon yo. -- no -- I wd. have yo. be aʃsured my pride wd prevent my
[2]soliciting for any involuntary act of friendship

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. There is apparently a symbol here, so far unexplained.
 2. This line is written vertically along the right margin.

Normalised Text




                             Wrote Sunday sent Tuesday ½ past 9 o'Clock
                                                         7th December 17

My Friend

I sat down immediately to answer yours --
the subject I own embarrasses me but I will endeavour
with the utmost candour to give my sentiments. -- You have
not at all surprised me by the declaration -- you have
pleas'd me by your confidence -- you have hurt me
by your caution -- you have in some measure afflicted
me by proving that your character will turn out what I
apprehended. -- Now my dear friend with respect to
the present object of your passion & fancy -- I know not
what to say -- let me however take the liberty of pointing
out that a female in that line has too much trick &
art not be a very dangerous object -- I do not reprove
You for having fix'd your affections -- for you tell
me -- beauty is amiable as well as interesting -- how
was it possible then for my young friend to steal
his heart against the united forces of Beauty & innocence
when under (even the mock) appearance of distress --
& likewise when that beauty & innocence could for his sake
& to attract his regard, condescend to use the common
little arts of her sex & profession to captivate & fix



a heart so much worth her while to conquer --
-- You desire me to “comfort” you -- what need can
you possibly have for comfort -- I do not mean
to make you vain or presumptuous -- but I think
you may indulge the pleasing certainty that the
lady returns your love ##
-- You desire me to “pardon” you -- for what? have
you been to blame ? -- is not your fault an
involuntary one? -- You desire me to “pity” you
Can I refuse my pity to a person in your
unhappy situation -- that would be cruel indeed --
-- -- -- You say “Heaven knows when this passion
will be extinguish'd” -- though I think Heaven has nothing to do --
in the affair -- yet I cannot imagine why my friend
should be at all solicitous to extinguish a flame so pure --
refin'd -- & honourable. -- I would advise you however to be
upon your guard -- & not plunge yourself into misfortunes heedlessly. There is no irony in this
Adieu let me have your confidence -- I am &
Ever will be your friend -- & as long as you choose
to allow it will express it. Adieu Adieu
Adieu.
I own my curiosity is rais'd to know why you find less time for
writing in G- than in the C- are not your occupations the same? do not
suppose I mean to lay a tax upon you -- no -- I would have you be assured my pride would prevent my
soliciting for any involuntary act of friendship

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 1. There is apparently a symbol here, so far unexplained.
 2. This line is written vertically along the right margin.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: Windsor Castle, The Royal Archives

Archive: GEO/ADD/3 Additional papers of George IV, as Prince, Regent, and King

Item title: Letter from Mary Hamilton, to George, Prince of Wales

Shelfmark: GEO/ADD/3/83/30

Correspondence Details

Author: Mary Hamilton

Place sent: unknown

Addressee: George, Prince of Wales

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 7 December 1779

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Mary Hamilton to George, Prince of Wales, on his declaration of his love [for Mary Robinson].
    Hamilton writes that the Prince has pleased her by his confidence, and advises that 'a female of that line has too much trick & art not to be a very dangerous object'. Hamilton questions why the Prince has less time to write.
    Written Sunday, sent Tuesday at ½ past 9 o'clock.
    [Draft].
   

Length: 1 sheet, 453 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: Transcription and XML version created as part of project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers', funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council under grant AH/S007121/1.

Cataloguer: , Archivist, The Royal Archives

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 19 May 2020

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