Single Letter

GEO/ADD/3/83/35

Letter from Mary Hamilton to George, Prince of Wales

Diplomatic Text


      Though my profeʃsions were perfectly
innocent -- I cannot resist the impulse of
a melancholy apprehension wch. has seiz'd my
spirits -- wch. whispers me that I have done
wrong -- forget then, I conjure you the impropriety
I have been guilty of in accepting your
friendship; forgive me too, if I beseech
you to withdraw your friendly attentions --
      I have a certain presentiment that ye. contin-
uance
of our friendship will only render me
wretched -- for to you, from the difference of our
situation, it will be of little consequence now --
& none hereafter -- yet do not imagine me of
so capricious a temper that I am already chang'd
-- that I no longer feel that friendship I
profeʃs'd -- no -- I shall cherish it to the end
of my existence.



------------------------------------------------------------
------ I have not fortitude enough to bear a
gust of malevolence, & shoud it ever paʃs over
my head -- I shd- bow down & be crush'd --
never to rise again. -- Adieu -- yet before I
bid you farewell let me add, that it wd. be
a painful reflection if I thought you wd. soon
utterly forget me -- I say soon, because I am
very sensible ye. world & the allurements wth- wch. you
will be surrounded, will hereafter claim all
your attention -- not to mention ye. instability
of human nature; -- & bear wth- me yet again
if I repeat my wishes -- for they proceed from ye-
heart -- May you enjoy every felicity this world
is capable of bestowing -- May fools never lead
you astray -- May the flattery of Knaves never
betray you For well I know how rare the human race
Show aught of truth or friendship b-t[1] ye.. face
That Wit but lends to perfidy perfidy a dart
And speech scarce useful but to veil the heart.
[2] -- in short, I wish you to be[3]






[4]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Hamilton has either corrected but to by and neglected to cancel the t, or (against the sense) she has changed by to but.
 2. Moved verse insertion here from the foot of the right-hand column. The intended insertion point is indicated by matching asterisks.
 3. The rest of this sentence is lost with the cut-away portion of the right-hand column. The verse addendum is written on the small strip that remains.
 4. The last page, mostly cut away, is blank but for the remains of a wax seal in the corner. Hamilton may have drafted this letter on the remains of an envelope from which she later cut away the address.

Normalised Text


      Though my professions were perfectly
innocent -- I cannot resist the impulse of
a melancholy apprehension which has seiz'd my
spirits -- which whispers me that I have done
wrong -- forget then, I conjure you the impropriety
I have been guilty of in accepting your
friendship; forgive me too, if I beseech
you to withdraw your friendly attentions --
      I have a certain presentiment that the continuance
of our friendship will only render me
wretched -- for to you, from the difference of our
situation, it will be of little consequence now --
& none hereafter -- yet do not imagine me of
so capricious a temper that I am already chang'd
-- that I no longer feel that friendship I
profess'd -- no -- I shall cherish it to the end
of my existence.




I have not fortitude enough to bear a
gust of malevolence, & should it ever pass over
my head -- I should bow down & be crush'd --
never to rise again. -- Adieu -- yet before I
bid you farewell let me add, that it would be
a painful reflection if I thought you would soon
utterly forget me -- I say soon, because I am
very sensible the world & the allurements with which you
will be surrounded, will hereafter claim all
your attention -- not to mention the instability
of human nature; -- & bear with me yet again
if I repeat my wishes -- for they proceed from the
heart -- May you enjoy every felicity this world
is capable of bestowing -- May fools never lead
you astray -- May the flattery of Knaves never
betray you For well I know how rare the human race
Show aught of truth or friendship b-t the face
That Wit but lends to perfidy a dart
And speech scarce useful but to veil the heart.
-- in short, I wish you to be






(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Hamilton has either corrected but to by and neglected to cancel the t, or (against the sense) she has changed by to but.
 2. Moved verse insertion here from the foot of the right-hand column. The intended insertion point is indicated by matching asterisks.
 3. The rest of this sentence is lost with the cut-away portion of the right-hand column. The verse addendum is written on the small strip that remains.
 4. The last page, mostly cut away, is blank but for the remains of a wax seal in the corner. Hamilton may have drafted this letter on the remains of an envelope from which she later cut away the address.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: Windsor Castle, The Royal Archives

Archive: GEO/ADD/3 Additional papers of George IV, as Prince, Regent, and King

Item title: Letter from Mary Hamilton to George, Prince of Wales

Shelfmark: GEO/ADD/3/83/35

Correspondence Details

Author: Mary Hamilton

Place sent: unknown

Addressee: George, Prince of Wales

Place received: unknown

Date sent: December 1779
notBefore (precision: medium)

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Mary Hamilton to George, Prince of Wales, on her feeling that she has done wrong; and asking him to withdraw his friendship.
    Hamilton describes her feeling that 'the continuance of our friendship will only render me wretched', and discusses their different situations.
    [Some text has been removed]
    [Draft]
   

Length: 1 sheet, 300 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: Transcription and XML version created as part of project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers', funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council under grant AH/S007121/1.

Cataloguer: , Archivist, The Royal Archives

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 20 May 2020

Document Image (pdf)