Single Letter

HAM/1/10/1/2

Letter from Caterina Clarke to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


      Relative to my Mothers death

9.

------------
Novr. 11th. 1779.
9 O'Clock


My dearest Miranda[1]

      Do not think you have
been out of my thoughts altho it
is an age since I have told you you were
in them; but you have been nevertheleʃs &
as the last is generally the strongest
impreʃsion I have not thought of you
lately without pain -- I hope your
spirits are better than when you
wrote to me last -- your spirits I say
for your spirits only are affected, but
for God's Sake my dearest don't give way
to melancholy ideas -- if any one has



can upon retrospection of their conduct
in the most trying situations can with
the most perfect aʃsurance applaud them
selves
, without flattery it is yourself --
your letter affected me I know what you
must have felt! I do feel for you &
particularly at this time & I have
wished we were not so much divided
I have thought of you with pain ever
since I recieved it, & it is the only letter
of yours that I never open'd after the
day it came to my hands -- I have
been going to write to you frequently
then I was at a loʃs how to write
to you -- & then I defer'd it in hopes of
coming to you soon -- we have been down[2]

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Notes


 1. A code name for Mary Hamilton among her close friends.
 2. The rest of the letter has been lost.

Normalised Text


     


------------
November 11th. 1779.
9 O'Clock


My dearest Miranda

      Do not think you have
been out of my thoughts although it
is an age since I have told you you were
in them; but you have been nevertheless &
as the last is generally the strongest
impression I have not thought of you
lately without pain -- I hope your
spirits are better than when you
wrote to me last -- your spirits I say
for your spirits only are affected, but
for God's Sake my dearest don't give way
to melancholy ideas -- if any one



upon retrospection of their conduct
in the most trying situations can with
the most perfect assurance applaud themselves
, without flattery it is yourself --
your letter affected me I know what you
must have felt! I do feel for you &
particularly at this time & I have
wished we were not so much divided
I have thought of you with pain ever
since I received it, & it is the only letter
of yours that I never open'd after the
day it came to my hands -- I have
been going to write to you frequently
then I was at a loss how to write
to you -- & then I defer'd it in hopes of
coming to you soon -- we have been down

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quotations,
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 1. A code name for Mary Hamilton among her close friends.
 2. The rest of the letter has been lost.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Caterina Clarke to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/10/1/2

Correspondence Details

Author: Caterina Clarke

Place sent: unknown

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: Kew (certainty: low)

Date sent: 11 November 1779

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Caterina Clarke to Mary Hamilton (addressed as 'My dearest Miranda'), expressing her sympathy on the death of Hamilton’s mother.
    Original reference No. 9.
   

Length: 2 sheets, 215 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2016/17 provided by The John Rylands Research Institute.

Research assistant: Sarah Connor, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Research assistant: Carla Seabra-Dacosta, MA student, University of Vigo

Transliterator: Joseph Gill, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2017)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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