Single Letter

HAM/1/10/1/3

Letter from Caterina Clarke to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


In returning from a Ball at Lord Stormonts
My Chairmen fell & my hand was cut with
the Glaʃs. &c.
[1]

Jany. 23d. 1780

I am really rather bored now my dear for
neither can I walk, nor venture with per-
miʃsion
in a chair -- so I am obliged to
make my enquiries of you in this man-
ner
-- I hope you have quite recover'd the
accident you met with not only I mean
the wound on your wrist but the hurry
it must have given your spirits -- I have
heard of now by Anna Maria[2] or I shd.
have sent -- I think -- at least I then felt
hurt that you wd. not tell me what it
seems I was the only person ignorant of
as it was impoʃsible that it shd. the whole



evening escape my observation & when I
did discover it -- my fears magnified the
matter -- & I impute to the alarm it gave
me my foolish behaviour afterwards -- but
it might have been the same for
I was not the only foolish one of the
Party & they[3] had no excuse, my Compts.
to Ld. N Lord Napier -- I hope he has recover'd his com-
-posure
of features --
I shd. like to have a little line from
you this morng. as it wd. convince me yt.
your hand was prety well but if it is
the least troublesome to you to write I
will hope that it is prety well if you send
me a good account of yourself --
Adieu my sweet friend

10. O'Clock
Thursday.[4]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. These three lines are added at top of p.1, written upside down.
 2. Sentence seems to be missing a word, perhaps which before I have.
 3. Mary Hamilton indicates with a caret that Clarke's they refers to Lord Napier.
 4. This dateline appears to the left of the closer.

Normalised Text



January 23d. 1780

I am really rather bored now my dear for
neither can I walk, nor venture with permission
in a chair -- so I am obliged to
make my enquiries of you in this manner
-- I hope you have quite recover'd the
accident you met with not only I mean
the wound on your wrist but the hurry
it must have given your spirits -- I have
heard of now by Anna Maria or I should
have sent -- I think -- at least I then felt
hurt that you would not tell me what it
seems I was the only person ignorant of
as it was impossible that it should the whole



evening escape my observation & when I
did discover it -- my fears magnified the
matter -- & I impute to the alarm it gave
me my foolish behaviour afterwards -- but
it might have been the same for
I was not the only foolish one of the
Party & they had no excuse, my Compliments
to Lord Napier -- I hope he has recover'd his composure
of features --
I should like to have a little line from
you this morning as it would convince me that
your hand was pretty well but if it is
the least troublesome to you to write I
will hope that it is pretty well if you send
me a good account of yourself --
Adieu my sweet friend

10. O'Clock
Thursday.

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. These three lines are added at top of p.1, written upside down.
 2. Sentence seems to be missing a word, perhaps which before I have.
 3. Mary Hamilton indicates with a caret that Clarke's they refers to Lord Napier.
 4. This dateline appears to the left of the closer.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Caterina Clarke to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/10/1/3

Correspondence Details

Author: Caterina Clarke

Place sent: London (certainty: low)

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 23 January 1780

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Caterina Clarke to Mary Hamilton. She makes enquiries via a note relating to Hamilton's accident, as she is not able to walk nor venture out in her chair. An annotation from Hamilton explains that on returning from a ball at Lord Stormont's, her chairmen fell and her hand was cut on the glass.
    Original reference No. 10.
   

Length: 2 sheets, 234 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2016/17 provided by The John Rylands Research Institute.

Research assistant: Sarah Connor, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Research assistant: Carla Seabra-Dacosta, MA student, University of Vigo

Transliterator: Laura Gritti, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2017)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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