Single Letter

HAM/1/10/1/5

Letter from Anna Maria Clarke to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


2.

1778[1]

Winchester
Sept- 11th --



My dearest Miranda[2],
      Remember that you desired
to hear from me, & this you know will fur-
nish
me with an excuse for sending you
a dull Letter, indeed I have nothing new or
agreeable[3] to relate nothing worthy of Miranda's
attention; but as there is scarcely any Bagatelle
which I could not relate with pleasure to
you may I not presume to hope that
a trifle from me may be acceptable to you for my
sake, & that pretty motto -- C'est l'Amitie qui donne
le prix -- is more intelligible to you than
to any one --
We are deeply engaged in musical En-
-tertainments
-- we have had heard two
Concerts -- which I cannot greatly commend,
yesterday morning -- the Meʃsiah was
performed in the ------ Cathedral -- but not in
the Choir -- the performers were attentive &
in a degree did justice to this sublime
Composition -- I imagine it has never
been heard in perfection -- since Handel[4]
conducted the Band -- I think you have
not heard it -- I can aʃsure you -- that you



then have a pleasure of a superiour kind
to experience, as I think I never heard
any music which so elevates the mind -- there are
in particular two of the Choruʃses -- which
have an astonishing effect -- & really
seem to correspond with the idea of Milton,[5]
who was as sensible of the power of
music as any - --
There let the pealing Organ blow
To the full voiced choir below
In service high & in anthems clear,
As may with sweetneʃs thro' mine ear
Diʃsolve me into extacies
And bring all Heav'n before my eyes.
[6]
the echo aʃsisted the effect of the music --
Mrs Parnel gained credit by singing one
of the finest songs -- in a word the amateurs[7]
were pleased -- & if you are not an
one of these I shall have tired you.
Today we are to have an Oratorio in
a room -- we were to have been this
morn at eight at the Camp -- to see
the whole Line drawn out, but unfor-
-tunately
rain prevented us -- I think I
ought not to regret it since it gives
me leisure to write to you -- one --
& by this means I enjoy one of the sweetest



pleasures of my life --
I recollect with pleasure the morning we
spent at Kew. & which your society made
as agreeable as short --
      I wish to hear from you -- there was a
Letter begun -- I hope you will not do
me the injustice to deprive me of it, we
shall stay here untill Wednesday -- when I
am certain I shall leave this family with
regret -- the more I become acquainted
with the Dr: & Mrs: W- -- the better I am
pleased with them -- he is a most ------
agreeable companion, & has those winning
& unaffected manners -- which recommend
& adorn good sense & learning -- while they
seem to conceal these excellencies -- in
the person I have named good temper seems
predominant over every other qualification --
Mrs. W- has many amiable qualities. & is
I dare say a good friend -- as well as an amiable
wife & mother.
      I hear have asked Dr: W to let me see his
Ode to fancy with which I am much
pleased -- I dare sayshould think you must have read it
in Dodsley's miscellanies -- it was performed
with music the first Evening & I think
it ais a fine Ode --



If I should be able to procure any thing
in the literary way for you I shall have
pleasure in doing it -- hitherto these
subjects have not been talked of --
We saw yesterday some drawings in Crayon[8]
of a young Lady who has never been taught,
Sr: Joshua Reynolds was struck with them
& said that she ought by no means to
have a master -- I think she has copied
a picture of Guido[9] -- I believe finely, --
& a head of our Saviour -- in which the
Expreʃsion is very characteristic -- if
I may say so -- she is a very pretty
woman -- looks sensible & agreeable & is
much admired here -- her name is Collins,
A
      Leonidas & Mrs. Glover are both well
& unite in Love to you -- I am certain
I may say that we should all form a
mutual wish -- to have you with us could
it poʃsibly be accomplished --
Adieu my dear Miranda -- You can
never doubt -- nor never - need the aʃsurance
of my Affection

                                                         tell me that you
do not
      Your --
Anna-Maria

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Moved year here from level with rest of date.
 2. A code name for Mary Hamilton among her close friends.
 3. After the word agreeable, Clarke has a very short horizontal stroke. If intended as punctuation, it is clearly smaller in both size and significance than her normal dash. Some of these marks are provisionally omitted from the transcription.
 4. George Frideric Handel (1685-1759), baroque composer.
 5. John Milton (1605-1674), poet.
 6. These six lines do not retain the original orthography.
 7. The first sense given for amateur in OED is 'One who loves or is fond of; one who has a taste for anything'.
 8. Crayons of the time were black and made with oil only.
 9. Guido Reni (1575-1642), an Italian painter of high-Baroque style (Wikipedia).

Normalised Text




Winchester
September 11th --



My dearest Miranda,
      Remember that you desired
to hear from me, & this you know will furnish
me with an excuse for sending you
a dull Letter, indeed I have nothing new or
agreeable to relate nothing worthy of Miranda's
attention; but as there is scarcely any Bagatelle
which I could not relate with pleasure to
you may I not presume to hope that
a trifle from me may be acceptable for my
sake, & that pretty motto -- C'est l'Amitié qui donne
le prix -- is more intelligible to you than
to any one --
We are deeply engaged in musical Entertainments
-- we have heard two
Concerts -- which I cannot greatly commend,
yesterday morning -- the Messiah was
performed in the Cathedral -- but not in
the Choir -- the performers were attentive &
in a degree did justice to this sublime
Composition -- I imagine it has never
been heard in perfection -- since Handel
conducted the Band -- I think you have
not heard it -- I can assure you -- that you



then have a pleasure of a superior kind
to experience, as I think I never heard
any music which so elevates the mind -- there are
in particular two of the Choruses -- which
have an astonishing effect -- & really
seem to correspond with the idea of Milton,
who was sensible of the power of
music --
There let the pealing Organ blow
To the full voiced choir below
In service high & in anthems clear,
As may with sweetness through mine ear
Dissolve me into extacies
And bring all Heav'n before my eyes.

the echo assisted the effect of the music --
Mrs Parnel gained credit by singing one
of the finest songs -- in a word the amateurs
were pleased -- & if you are not
one of these I shall have tired you.
Today we are to have an Oratorio in
a room -- we were to have been this
morn at eight at the Camp -- to see
the whole Line drawn out, but unfortunately
rain prevented us -- I think I
ought not to regret it since it gives
me leisure to write to you -- --
& by this means I enjoy one of the sweetest



pleasures of my life --
I recollect with pleasure the morning we
spent at Kew. & which your society made
as agreeable as short --
      I wish to hear from you -- there was a
Letter begun -- I hope you will not do
me the injustice to deprive me of it, we
shall stay here until Wednesday -- when I
am certain I shall leave this family with
regret -- the more I become acquainted
with Dr: & Mrs: Walton -- the better I am
pleased with them -- he is a most
agreeable companion, & has those winning
& unaffected manners -- which recommend
& adorn good sense & learning -- while they
seem to conceal these excellencies -- in
the person I have named good temper seems
predominant over every other qualification --
Mrs. Walton has many amiable qualities. & is
I dare say a good friend -- as well as an amiable
wife & mother.
      I have asked Dr: Walton to let me see his
Ode to fancy with which I am much
pleased -- I should think you must have read it
in Dodsley's miscellanies -- it was performed
with music the first Evening & I think
it is a fine Ode --



If I should be able to procure any thing
in the literary way for you I shall have
pleasure in doing it -- hitherto these
subjects have not been talked of --
We saw yesterday some drawings in Crayon
of a young Lady who has never been taught,
Sir Joshua Reynolds was struck with them
& said that she ought by no means to
have a master -- she has copied
a picture of Guido -- I believe finely, --
& a head of our Saviour -- in which the
Expression is very characteristic -- if
I may say so -- she is a very pretty
woman -- looks sensible & agreeable & is
much admired here -- her name is Collins,

      Leonidas & Mrs. Glover are both well
& unite in Love to you -- I am certain
I may say that we should all form a
mutual wish -- to have you with us could
it possibly be accomplished --
Adieu my dear Miranda -- You can
never doubt -- nor never need the assurance
of my Affection

                                                         tell me that you
do not
      Your --
Anna-Maria

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Moved year here from level with rest of date.
 2. A code name for Mary Hamilton among her close friends.
 3. After the word agreeable, Clarke has a very short horizontal stroke. If intended as punctuation, it is clearly smaller in both size and significance than her normal dash. Some of these marks are provisionally omitted from the transcription.
 4. George Frideric Handel (1685-1759), baroque composer.
 5. John Milton (1605-1674), poet.
 6. These six lines do not retain the original orthography.
 7. The first sense given for amateur in OED is 'One who loves or is fond of; one who has a taste for anything'.
 8. Crayons of the time were black and made with oil only.
 9. Guido Reni (1575-1642), an Italian painter of high-Baroque style (Wikipedia).

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Anna Maria Clarke to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/10/1/5

Correspondence Details

Author: Anna Maria Clarke

Place sent: Winchester

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: Kew (certainty: low)

Date sent: 11 September 1778

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Anna Maria Clarke to Mary Hamilton. She reminds Hamilton that she 'desired to hear from me'. She claims that she has 'nothing new or agreeable to relate nothing worthy of Miranda's attention'. Clarke then writes of two concerts which she 'cannot greatly commend'. One was the Messiah, performed at the Cathedral. She imagines that this 'sublime composition' has 'never been heard in perfection since Handel conducted the Band'. She continues to write of music and of the society that she has been engaged in, and of mutual acquaintances including a Dr W (Walton), whom she finds to be a very agreeable companion. She regrets that rain prevented them going early that morning to 'the Camp -- to see the whole Line drawn out', and she mentions some drawings by a Miss Collins that were praised by Sir Joshua Reynolds.
    Dated at Winchester.
    Original reference No. 2.
   

Length: 3 sheets, 724 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2016/17 provided by The John Rylands Research Institute.

Research assistant: Sarah Connor, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Michael Cameron, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2017)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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