Single Letter

HAM/1/14/85

Letter from Martha Carolina Goldsworthy to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


98

                             6 o' Clock

My Dearest

Happy should I be could I answer your
Query, of when do we come to Town? believe
me as ignorant of it as yourself, it
must depend upon when Mr Hawkins[1]
thinks it safe for P Adolphus to see
his Br & Sister, I own I had at first
flattered myself a Month would have
been the longest Quarantine, I now
Philosophically resign myself to the
more distant Period of 5 Weeks
& happy shall I be if I am not
disapointed, but you shall know
the moment I do -- I am sorry my
dear you have ʃuch causes for uneasineʃs



this Life is certainly most thoroughly
disguised with them, I trust I am
thankful for the Bleʃsings I receive
but yet I have felt many better
moments. The Society of the Smelts
has kept me alive, I shall lose
them on Monday, but as my anxiety
is thank God happily at an end
on account of the Dear Children, I
must bear the ennui & Solitude
with calmneʃs I have pleasant
moments to look back to, & the
painful ones I will endeavour to
dwell upon as little as poʃsible.
My Dear Br dined with me to day
& staid till 5 o' Clock, he has told
me a thing which has entertained
me beyond description, & if you know
him as well as I do would you, which



is, that he is to be one of Sir John
Irwin's Squire's at the aproaching
Installation of Knights of Bath,
he really made me laugh till I was
allmost Sick at the Idea, pray
tell it Mrs Cheveley for I am sure
she will enjoy it -- I will give
Wm this Letter that he may
judge of my beautiful countenance
but I do aʃsure you my Br thinks
I look remarkably well -- God
Bleʃs you my Dr Friend, a thousand
thanks for all yr kindneʃs the
last Cheese was excellent & I daresay
this will be the same Adieu Adieu
                                                         Affly Your
MCG --

We mean to be smart to morrow,
tho not so fine as you Mesdames habitant
de la Cour -- but we shall have new Gowns --

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Notes


 1. Probably Pennel Hawkins, a surgeon in the royal household from 1761 (Inst. of Hist. Research).

Normalised Text



                             6 o' Clock

My Dearest

Happy should I be could I answer your
Query, of when do we come to Town? believe
me as ignorant of it as yourself, it
must depend upon when Mr Hawkins
thinks it safe for Prince Adolphus to see
his Brother & Sister, I own I had at first
flattered myself a Month would have
been the longest Quarantine, I now
Philosophically resign myself to the
more distant Period of 5 Weeks
& happy shall I be if I am not
disappointed, but you shall know
the moment I do -- I am sorry my
dear you have such causes for uneasiness



this Life is certainly most thoroughly
disguised with them, I trust I am
thankful for the Blessings I receive
but yet I have felt many better
moments. The Society of the Smelts
has kept me alive, I shall lose
them on Monday, but as my anxiety
is thank God happily at an end
on account of the Dear Children, I
must bear the ennui & Solitude
with calmness I have pleasant
moments to look back to, & the
painful ones I will endeavour to
dwell upon as little as possible.
My Dear Brother dined with me to day
& stayed till 5 o' Clock, he has told
me a thing which has entertained
me beyond description, & if you know
him as well as I do would you, which



is, that he is to be one of Sir John
Irwin's Squire's at the approaching
Installation of Knights of Bath,
he really made me laugh till I was
almost Sick at the Idea, pray
tell it Mrs Cheveley for I am sure
she will enjoy it -- I will give
William this Letter that he may
judge of my beautiful countenance
but I do assure you my Brother thinks
I look remarkably well -- God
Bless you my Dear Friend, a thousand
thanks for all your kindness the
last Cheese was excellent & I daresay
this will be the same Adieu Adieu
                                                         Affectionately Your
Martha Carolina Goldsworthy --

We mean to be smart to morrow,
though not so fine as you Mesdames habitant
de la Cour -- but we shall have new Gowns --

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 1. Probably Pennel Hawkins, a surgeon in the royal household from 1761 (Inst. of Hist. Research).

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Martha Carolina Goldsworthy to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/14/85

Correspondence Details

Author: Martha Carolina Goldsworthy

Place sent: unknown

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: unknown

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Martha Carolina Goldsworthy to Mary Hamilton. She writes with general information of her time in quarantine with the royal children. She does not know when she is to return to town as it depends on when it is deemed safe for Price Adolphus to see his brother and sister. She is philosophical about her situation. The society of Mr and Mrs Smelt 'has kept me alive', but she will lose their company on Monday.
    Original reference No. 98.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 364 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2017/18 provided by Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Georgia Tutt, MA student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Md Nazmus Saqueb Kathon, MA student, Uppsala University (submitted June 2018)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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