Single Letter

HAM/1/14/86

Letter from Martha Carolina Goldsworthy to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


I am really anxious my Dearest
to hear how you have paʃsed
your Night, for I fear you
have not slept, pray let me
know & whether you are
not hurried out of your Senses.
Believe me my Dear I feel
most gratefully your Affectionate
attention to me, I have a
grateful heart, and I shall
ever feel it, I was sorry I
did not see you last Night,

      99[1]




had I heard your Voice, tho
I was stepping into Bed I
should have desired you to
walk in. Can I or any body
belonging to me be of any
use to you, pray if I can
let me know. Will you
be so good as to present my
Duty & Love to the Dear
Princeʃs's & say how very
sensible I am of their
goodneʃs to me I am sure
they will behave as well as



poʃsible to you, as it will be
a great ease to my mind
as you have so much additional
trouble upon my account, if
I poʃsibly can I will answer
their kind Notes but writing
does not agree very well
with my poor good for
nothing Chest. I must
trouble you my Dst to
thank Mlle Moula for her
very kind Note, & to tell
her what I have ordered her



Dinner at two o' Clock as Ly
Charlotte desired me, that
she might return in to
the Nursery at three, to set
you at Liberty. Adieu my
Dst my kind Comps to all
the Nursery & believe me
                             most Affly
                                Yr-
                                  MCG --

pray kiʃs Prʃs Mary for me
as she can not understand my
Duty in other ways --

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. The number appears at bottom right, written vertically.

Normalised Text


I am really anxious my Dearest
to hear how you have passed
your Night, for I fear you
have not slept, pray let me
know & whether you are
not hurried out of your Senses.
Believe me my Dear I feel
most gratefully your Affectionate
attention to me, I have a
grateful heart, and I shall
ever feel it, I was sorry I
did not see you last Night,





had I heard your Voice, though
I was stepping into Bed I
should have desired you to
walk in. Can I or any body
belonging to me be of any
use to you, pray if I can
let me know. Will you
be so good as to present my
Duty & Love to the Dear
Princess's & say how very
sensible I am of their
goodness to me I am sure
they will behave as well as



possible to you, as it will be
a great ease to my mind
as you have so much additional
trouble upon my account, if
I possibly can I will answer
their kind Notes but writing
does not agree very well
with my poor good for
nothing Chest. I must
trouble you my Dearest to
thank Mademoiselle Moula for her
very kind Note, & to tell
her what I have ordered her



Dinner at two o'Clock as Lady
Charlotte desired me, that
she might return in to
the Nursery at three, to set
you at Liberty. Adieu my
Dearest my kind Compliments to all
the Nursery & believe me
                             most Affectionately
                                Your
                                  Martha Carolina Goldsworthy --

pray kiss Princess Mary for me
as she can not understand my
Duty in other ways --

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. The number appears at bottom right, written vertically.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Martha Carolina Goldsworthy to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/14/86

Correspondence Details

Author: Martha Carolina Goldsworthy

Place sent: unknown

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: unknown
notBefore 1782 (precision: low)
notAfter 1783 (precision: low)

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Martha Carolina Goldsworthy to Mary Hamilton. She writes to Hamilton making enquiries on how she had passed the night, on her own health and on the princesses. Hamilton is taking on some of Goldsworthy's duties whilst she is ill and Goldsworthy asks her to give her love to the princesses and to let them know how sensible she is of their 'goodness to me I am sure they will behave as well as possible to you, as it will be a great ease to my mind as you have so much additional trouble upon my account'.
    Original reference No. 99.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 277 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2018/19 provided by Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Chenming Gao, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Mariola Kotromanac, MA student, Uppsala University (submitted June 2019)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 3 August 2020

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