Single Letter

HAM/1/15/1/26

Notes from Charlotte Margaret Gunning to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text

[1]

27

[2]
My dear I am pretty well but do not go to Mrs
Montagus tonight -- you know it is my Brothers
Ball -- I shall be delighted to see you tomorrow
at ½ past ten or 11 -- I shall certainly be up then
& should naturally be so much earlier notwithstang
the Ball had I not the prospect of a long fatiguing
Drawingroom before me -- I have three caps
in the world which my maid is now shewing
yours -- I never wear anything on my neck but
a square handk or yard of Gause at the inside
of my Gowns & a double pleating of blond[3] round
my shoulders when I am much dreʃsed, none
except then -- but most my Gowns have      
capes to them -- adieu God bleʃs you --
I expect you tomorrow --



[4]
                                                        
My dear Friend! -- I was so distracted when I
returned home last night, that I had not recollection
sufficient to ask whether you had been here -- this
moment I see your name & upon inquiry find
that my Servants gave you no account of me or
of the misfortunes in Ld Carlisles family -- their
Daughter died yesterday morning, I went to them
immediatly and remained till they set out for
the Country in the Evening -- I go down to them ------
& shall return on Wednesday -- I have had a very
bad night but am rather better to day -- I am going
out to give 20000 orders about mourning &c for Ly C.
if I can call on you I will -- thank God your little
darling is quite recovered -- God preserve her to you
& bleʃs you -- I shall see you in comfort on my return
adieu -- adieu






[5]

My dear Friend, we are very much diʃsappointed
not to see you to day at dinner, but the cause
of your excuse makes me really unhappy
I ------ partake all your anxietys & fears for your
dear little Girl -- pray let me know particul[arly]
how she does to day -- what is her Complaint?
I pray she may soon recover & relieve your
apprehensions & uneasineʃs -- I hope to see you
soon, I was last night at the Opera with the
Queen -- to night antient Musick -- tomorr[ow]
Drawingroom, I shall call on you Friday --
      adieu in haste -- yours & ever CM.G.     





2d April 1788[6]

      2 April 1788[7]

Mrs Dickenson[8]

11th April
1788
[9]

To
Mrs Dickenson[10]

9th April
1788
[11]

9th. April 1788 St. James's[12]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. The first page consists of two notes pasted together.
 2. First note.
 3. Blonde lace is 'a silk lace of two threads, twisted and formed in hexagonal meshes' (OED s.v. blond adj. and n., B.2a).
 4. Second note.
 5. Third note, which is pasted on the back of the first two notes.
 6. Moved date (dt1) here from the right margin of the first note, written vertically.
 7. Moved date (dt2) from the bottom left of the first note.
 8. This line (add1) is moved from the back of the first note, written upside down.
 9. Moved date (dt3) here from the top right of the second note, written over the join where the bottom of the first note overlaps the second.
 10. Moved address (add2) here from the back of the second note.
 11. Moved date (dt4) here from the right margin of the third note, written vertically.
 12. Moved address (add3) here from the bottom left of the third note.

Normalised Text




My dear I am pretty well but do not go to Mrs
Montagus tonight -- you know it is my Brothers
Ball -- I shall be delighted to see you tomorrow
at ½ past ten or 11 -- I shall certainly be up then
& should naturally be so much earlier notwithstanding
the Ball had I not the prospect of a long fatiguing
Drawingroom before me -- I have three caps
in the world which my maid is now shewing
yours -- I never wear anything on my neck but
a square handkerchief or yard of Gauze at the inside
of my Gowns & a double pleating of blond round
my shoulders when I am much dressed, none
except then -- but most my Gowns have      
capes to them -- adieu God bless you --
I expect you tomorrow --




                                                        
My dear Friend! -- I was so distracted when I
returned home last night, that I had not recollection
sufficient to ask whether you had been here -- this
moment I see your name & upon inquiry find
that my Servants gave you no account of me or
of the misfortunes in Lord Carlisles family -- their
Daughter died yesterday morning, I went to them
immediately and remained till they set out for
the Country in the Evening -- I go down to them ------
& shall return on Wednesday -- I have had a very
bad night but am rather better to day -- I am going
out to give 20000 orders about mourning &c for Lady Carlisle
if I can call on you I will -- thank God your little
darling is quite recovered -- God preserve her to you
& bless you -- I shall see you in comfort on my return
adieu -- adieu








My dear Friend, we are very much disappointed
not to see you to day at dinner, but the cause
of your excuse makes me really unhappy
I partake all your anxieties & fears for your
dear little Girl -- pray let me know particularly
how she does to day -- what is her Complaint?
I pray she may soon recover & relieve your
apprehensions & uneasiness -- I hope to see you
soon, I was last night at the Opera with the
Queen -- to night ancient Music -- tomorrow
Drawingroom, I shall call on you Friday --
      adieu in haste -- yours & ever Charlotte Margaret Gunning     






     

Mrs Dickenson


To
Mrs Dickenson



(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. The first page consists of two notes pasted together.
 2. First note.
 3. Blonde lace is 'a silk lace of two threads, twisted and formed in hexagonal meshes' (OED s.v. blond adj. and n., B.2a).
 4. Second note.
 5. Third note, which is pasted on the back of the first two notes.
 6. Moved date (dt1) here from the right margin of the first note, written vertically.
 7. Moved date (dt2) from the bottom left of the first note.
 8. This line (add1) is moved from the back of the first note, written upside down.
 9. Moved date (dt3) here from the top right of the second note, written over the join where the bottom of the first note overlaps the second.
 10. Moved address (add2) here from the back of the second note.
 11. Moved date (dt4) here from the right margin of the third note, written vertically.
 12. Moved address (add3) here from the bottom left of the third note.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Notes from Charlotte Margaret Gunning to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/15/1/26

Correspondence Details

Author: Charlotte Margaret Gunning

Place sent: London (certainty: medium)

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: London (certainty: medium)

Date sent: 2, 11 and 9 April 1788

Letter Description

Summary: Three notes from Charlotte Gunning to Mary Hamilton. In the first note, dated 2 April 1788, Gunning writes that she will not go to Mrs Montagu's that night, as she is to attend her brother's ball (see HAM/1/15/1/25), but can meet Hamilton the following day. She also writes on the subject of clothes.
    The second note, dated 11 April 1788, relates to the death of Lady Carlisle's daughter.
    The third note, dated 9 April 1788, expresses regret for Hamilton's absence at dinner because of her daughter's illness.
    Original reference No. 27.
   

Length: 3 sheets, 384 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2014/15 and 2015/16 provided by the Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Isabella Formisano, former MA student, University of Manchester

Research assistant: Carla Seabra-Dacosta, MA student, University of Vigo

Transliterator: Rhia Abukhalil, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2016)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 2 April 2020

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