Single Letter

HAM/1/15/1/6

Note from Charlotte Margaret Gunning to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


5

      My dear dear Friend -- pray write me a few lines to tell me how
you do -- Mr Digby[1] afflicted me very much by telling me that you
imagined I was grown cold and indifferent to you, in consequence
of the exchange of letters -- How could you for a moment suppose
it poʃsible -- & how could that in any way influence or alter
my sentiments towards you -- are you become leʃs estimable
or I leʃs capable of esteeming & loving your many amiable
qualities -- No -- believe me, when I aʃsure you that I never
was more sensible of them, or more truly attached to you --
& I believe you will agree with me in thinking that friendship
does not cool or diminish in proportion as it is independant --
I have every day intended to come to you but my time has been
constantly taken up by ------------------------ a circumstance
I will acquaint you with when we meet -- it was this which, calling
my immediate attention obliged me to diʃsappoint you the
day we were to have gone into the city -- lest you should mistake
the nature of this busineʃs, I shall just say that it is about a very
distreʃsed family, & that you will find mine increased by a very
pretty child whom I am going to educate & take care of --
pray give my very kind Compts & amities to Mr D -- who I hear is
come -- Mr Digby is quite charmed with his manner & conception
so everything is at length settled, I wish you both joy & pray God
on my knees to pour on your heads every bleʃsing which you both
so well deserve -- He knows how sincerely happy I am to think



that you will be so soon perfectly so -- adieu, & if any gloom
or doubt remains on your mind may the aʃsurances of my
sincere attachment dispel it -- God bleʃs you -- I should have
come to day my self instead of writing, but Sir Harry Bridge[man][2]
who has some busineʃs of consequence to communicate ------
me upon, sends me word that he will be here about 1 or 2 --
write to me some account of yourself, & your proceedings
& intentions -- adieu -- I shall go out of Town for two or three
days between the Abbey's next week -- --

Honble Miʃs Gunning
5th June 1785
[3]

5th. June 1785[4]

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Notes


 1. Colonel Hon. Stephen Digby (1742-1800), whom Gunning would marry in 1790.
 2. Sir Henry Bridgeman, 5th Baronet (1725-1800).
 3. These two lines are written vertically at bottom left of page 2.
 4. This line is written vertically at bottom right of page 2.

Normalised Text



      My dear dear Friend -- pray write me a few lines to tell me how
you do -- Mr Digby afflicted me very much by telling me that you
imagined I was grown cold and indifferent to you, in consequence
of the exchange of letters -- How could you for a moment suppose
it possible -- & how could that in any way influence or alter
my sentiments towards you -- are you become less estimable
or I less capable of esteeming & loving your many amiable
qualities -- No -- believe me, when I assure you that I never
was more sensible of them, or more truly attached to you --
& I believe you will agree with me in thinking that friendship
does not cool or diminish in proportion as it is independent --
I have every day intended to come to you but my time has been
constantly taken up by a circumstance
I will acquaint you with when we meet -- it was this which, calling
my immediate attention obliged me to disappoint you the
day we were to have gone into the city -- lest you should mistake
the nature of this business, I shall just say that it is about a very
distressed family, & that you will find mine increased by a very
pretty child whom I am going to educate & take care of --
pray give my very kind Compliments & amities to Mr Dickenson -- who I hear is
come -- Mr Digby is quite charmed with his manner & conception
so everything is at length settled, I wish you both joy & pray God
on my knees to pour on your heads every blessing which you both
so well deserve -- He knows how sincerely happy I am to think



that you will be so soon perfectly so -- adieu, & if any gloom
or doubt remains on your mind may the assurances of my
sincere attachment dispel it -- God bless you -- I should have
come to day my self instead of writing, but Sir Harry Bridgeman
who has some business of consequence to communicate ------
me upon, sends me word that he will be here about 1 or 2 --
write to me some account of yourself, & your proceedings
& intentions -- adieu -- I shall go out of Town for two or three
days between the Abbey's next week -- --



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 1. Colonel Hon. Stephen Digby (1742-1800), whom Gunning would marry in 1790.
 2. Sir Henry Bridgeman, 5th Baronet (1725-1800).
 3. These two lines are written vertically at bottom left of page 2.
 4. This line is written vertically at bottom right of page 2.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Note from Charlotte Margaret Gunning to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/15/1/6

Correspondence Details

Author: Charlotte Margaret Gunning

Place sent: London (certainty: high)

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: London (certainty: medium)

Date sent: 5 June 1785

Letter Description

Summary: Note from Charlotte Gunning to Mary Hamilton. Mr Digby [Colonel Hon. Stephen Digby (1742-1800), whom Gunning would marry in 1790] has informed Gunning that Hamilton feels as if Gunning has gone 'cold' towards her. She writes to assure her that this is far from true.
    Original reference No. 5.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 383 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2014/15 and 2015/16 provided by the Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Donald Alasdair Morrison, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Isabelle Harris, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted November 2014)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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