Single Letter

HAM/1/15/2/12

Letter from Mary Hamilton to Charlotte Margaret Gunning

Diplomatic Text


I am now got to yours of the 20th.- Caled[1] received
your Compts. with pleasure & I managed so well,
that an answer, otherwise than through me
was not neceʃsary --      give my grateful thanks
to Benedict[2] & tell him I shall ask him for
three Guineas when I see him -- I have the
comfort of telling you that a very considerable
subscription has been raised for the poor
Widow; more of this when we meet, -- Ah when
will that be! I think I hear you exclaim. --
Do not from what I have said judge too
unfavorable of Caled -- he is not I beleive
so amiable as I thought him -- nor do I
think him a proper person for the place
he fills -- he will do very well to live in
the World
, & has liv'd much in it -- he is
acquainted wth. the tricks of ye. World wch. often
makes him advance illiberal notions &c.&c
      Hamet & Omar I am fully persuaded are
most estimable characters -- I know rather
more of the former, as he has, in our rides
opened himself to me with all the candour



& confidence of friendship.
You make me tremble my Astrea -- I do not
like the account you send me of the state of
your mind -- Oh beware of endulging yourself
to think over past events -- for surely my
Love to that only could2 you1[3] allude -- "pity
you" -- yes I do from my Soul -- how could
you -- how could my friend imagine I ever
should "despise" her -- my God how could you
write the word -- do I not know & feel that
my Astreas mind is superior -- she never
can act wrong -- she may indeed feel too
much -- you have charg'd me not to alarm
myself -- I will not -- but then I conjure
you keep me not in ignorance in any thing
relative to you -- you have indeed promised
me you will not, & I depend upon your
promises. You say "tell me that you love
me"; esteem me" -- could you see into my
Heart you wld- see how I lov'd -- &, I must
esteem where I greatly love. Thank



God You are better in Health. -- 'tis impoʃsible
for me to tell you whether I shall be at Babel
or Leuctra at my return.
Yours of the 24th. is apparently apparently
written in great agitation of spirits -- Benedicts
indisposition will certainly increase your
complaints -- I hope to receive better accounts of him
tomorrow -- how could you be so indiscreet
to heat yourself by walking -- surely there
could be no occasion so preʃsing to oblige
You to walk in August in Town -- I am
glad you are going to drink the Bath waters
they always stand- your friend. -- let me
know if they agree equally well with you as
formerly. --
Monday Morng. 20th. I had intended telling
You of a little excursion we took on Friday
but I must postpone it till next post --
Yours of Satry. is just come -- my fears are
realliz'd -- Your letter has dejected me



beyond expreʃsion -- yet I thank you for it.
let me hear next post -- fail not, for you
know wt. I shall suffer if I am kept in
suspence -- God Almighty protect you &
restore Health to Benedict & Yourself --
      Adieu my friend my Astrea -- I
have not time for more Adieu ------
MirandaMiranda[4]


Lady Charlotte Finch Perfecta desires you will accept her best
Compts. shd. be obliged if you wd. send the
inclosed for her -- [5]

27th August
1780[6]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. The code name 'Caled', as also 'Hamet' and 'Omar' in the next paragraph, appear to be taken from John Hawkesworth's Almoran and Hamet: An Oriental Tale (1760). Almoran and Hamet are twin heirs to the throne of Persia. Hamet, the younger twin, becomes 'gentle, courteous, and temperate', unlike his 'haughty [...] voluptuous [...] and iraſcible' elder brother (according to the account of the poem in The London Magazine vol.30). Omar is 'an old faithful counſellor', and Caled an officer in charge of the prison gate.
 2. It is possible that 'Benedict' is a code name for Gunning's brother George (see HAM/1/15/2/25).
 3. Marked for reversal.
 4. Annotator has crossed out 'Miranda'; cf. HAM/1/15/2/16 and 18.
 5. Postscript added as explanatory note. Lady Charlotte Finch (née Fermor) (1725-1813), royal governess.
 6. These two lines appear at the bottom left of p.3, written upside down.

Normalised Text


I am now got to yours of the 20th.- Caled received
your Compliments with pleasure & I managed so well,
that an answer, otherwise than through me
was not necessary --      give my grateful thanks
to Benedict & tell him I shall ask him for
three Guineas when I see him -- I have the
comfort of telling you that a very considerable
subscription has been raised for the poor
Widow; more of this when we meet, -- Ah when
will that be! I think I hear you exclaim. --
Do not from what I have said judge too
unfavorable of Caled -- he is not I believe
so amiable as I thought him -- nor do I
think him a proper person for the place
he fills -- he will do very well to live in
the World
, & has liv'd much in it -- he is
acquainted with the tricks of the World which often
makes him advance illiberal notions &c.&c
      Hamet & Omar I am fully persuaded are
most estimable characters -- I know rather
more of the former, as he has, in our rides
opened himself to me with all the candour



& confidence of friendship.
You make me tremble my Astrea -- I do not
like the account you send me of the state of
your mind -- Oh beware of indulging yourself
to think over past events -- for surely my
Love to that only you could allude -- "pity
you" -- yes I do from my Soul -- how could
you -- how could my friend imagine I ever
should "despise" her -- my God how could you
write the word -- do I not know & feel that
my Astreas mind is superior -- she never
can act wrong -- she may indeed feel too
much -- you have charg'd me not to alarm
myself -- I will not -- but then I conjure
you keep me not in ignorance in any thing
relative to you -- you have indeed promised
me you will not, & I depend upon your
promises. You say "tell me that you love
me"; esteem me" -- could you see into my
Heart you would see how I lov'd -- &, I must
esteem where I greatly love. Thank



God You are better in Health. -- 'tis impossible
for me to tell you whether I shall be at Babel
or Leuctra at my return.
Yours of the 24th. is apparently
written in great agitation of spirits -- Benedicts
indisposition will certainly increase your
complaints -- I hope to receive better accounts of him
tomorrow -- how could you be so indiscreet
to heat yourself by walking -- surely there
could be no occasion so pressing to oblige
You to walk in August in Town -- I am
glad you are going to drink the Bath waters
they always stand your friend. -- let me
know if they agree equally well with you as
formerly. --
Monday Morning 20th. I had intended telling
You of a little excursion we took on Friday
but I must postpone it till next post --
Yours of Saturday is just come -- my fears are
realiz'd -- Your letter has dejected me



beyond expression -- yet I thank you for it.
let me hear next post -- fail not, for you
know what I shall suffer if I am kept in
suspense -- God Almighty protect you &
restore Health to Benedict & Yourself --
      Adieu my friend my Astrea -- I
have not time for more Adieu
Miranda


Perfecta desires you will accept her best
Compliments should be obliged if you would send the
enclosed for her --

27th August
1780

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. The code name 'Caled', as also 'Hamet' and 'Omar' in the next paragraph, appear to be taken from John Hawkesworth's Almoran and Hamet: An Oriental Tale (1760). Almoran and Hamet are twin heirs to the throne of Persia. Hamet, the younger twin, becomes 'gentle, courteous, and temperate', unlike his 'haughty [...] voluptuous [...] and iraſcible' elder brother (according to the account of the poem in The London Magazine vol.30). Omar is 'an old faithful counſellor', and Caled an officer in charge of the prison gate.
 2. It is possible that 'Benedict' is a code name for Gunning's brother George (see HAM/1/15/2/25).
 3. Marked for reversal.
 4. Annotator has crossed out 'Miranda'; cf. HAM/1/15/2/16 and 18.
 5. Postscript added as explanatory note. Lady Charlotte Finch (née Fermor) (1725-1813), royal governess.
 6. These two lines appear at the bottom left of p.3, written upside down.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Mary Hamilton to Charlotte Margaret Gunning

Shelfmark: HAM/1/15/2/12

Correspondence Details

Author: Mary Hamilton

Place sent: Windsor (certainty: high)

Addressee: Charlotte Margaret Gunning

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 27 August 1780

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Mary Hamilton to Charlotte Gunning, relating to a subscription that Hamilton is collecting for a 'poor widow'. Hamilton also writes (using code names) of others in the Court, one of whom at least she thinks not suited to the role, being 'acquainted w[i]th the tricks of the World'. Much of the letter is concerned with Gunning's state of mind and their relationship.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 577 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2014/15 and 2015/16 provided by the Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Donald Alasdair Morrison, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Anna Lawson-Walker, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted November 2014)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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