Single Letter

HAM/1/15/2/25

Letter from Mary Hamilton to Charlotte Margaret Gunning

Diplomatic Text


22

Horton 3d June 1783
Tuesday Eveg 9 o'Clock


      Here I am comfortably enjoying the
Society of Your Father, Brother, & Sister,
whilst You are dreading the fatigue of tomorrow,
I have ask'd for a Folio sheet, wch. I intend,
if I have any influence, to have fill'd for
Your amusement -- how it will answer that
intention I know not -- yet we have been
(Notwithstanding the Rain) wonderfully bright
this Afternoon -- particularly Sr. Robert[1] --

Miʃs Hamilton has been tiring herself to Death here -- In
the first Place when she came in, she found no Fire and thought
herself quite lost in the three comfortleʃs Rooms especially
as the Weather towards 3 o'clock changed very much for the
worse. During Dinner she was so perished with the Cold that
she could not eat a morcel, & tho' we at last prevailed to
have a Fire in the eating-Room yet she was so ill used by Sr
Robt who through a very usual Absence of Mind called her
Miʃs Flora, that I was quite ashamed at the reception our
Guest met with -- It then began to rain violently, and when
a little after 8 it ceased, by way of shewing Miʃs Hamilton
the Stables &c she was dragged up to her ancles in the Wet.
We are now going to Supper and sitting very comfortably by the
Fire-side -- -- only think of that -- (I thought of you last Night
that is by the by) -- . [2]      Miʃs H.- thinks the Suite of Rooms
horrible, old fashioned & a hundred horrible &ceteras.[3]



I deny every thing that has been said, upon the foregoing
subject; Miʃs H- has spent a delightfull day -- she had a
very pleasant drive from C- Hall[4] -- is quite enchanted with
this place -- thinks it, by far the most beautifull spot in this Country ------
------ -- the house magnificent, commodious, & surtout comfortable,
& is particularly charmed, with the numbers of dear little
round tables -- I need not tell you that our conversation has
been lively, & brilliant. Miʃs Hamilton has been wonderfully
entertained by my stdrumming upon the harpsichord -- by our
continual eloges of Flora -- & by Papas wit -- in short she
it will quite break her heart, to tear herself from our delightfull
society, & will only live by the hopes of soon returning to it.[5]

Bells wit -- [Is how much in Town? I will trouble you to let me know --
How snug we are -- My Compts: to the little Worthies -- Have you been
lately in the Hotel de Ponthomme or conveyed any where in the Pink
What Nonsense I have been writing -- My -- only think of that -- ]
we underwritten beg of you to present our congratulations to their
Majesties tomorrow -- G. Gunning[6]


Mary Hamilton[7]
Rob Gunning
B. Gunning[8]

This is all a prelude
to M. Hamiltons
comfortable Letter --

Mr. Gunning desires
me to tell Yo. all the Warts
upon his fingers are gone -- [9]

I hope you will think
B.G-s letter more comfortable[10]

[11]
I cannot flatter my good friends by praising their
Wit -- but as they have fail'd, I have not the presump-
tion
to suppose I should succeed, I will tell You then in plain terms my
dearest friend yt. I have spent a very agreeable day and
that my reception has been too pleasant not to make me
resolve to ac̄ept the friendly invitation of spending
some time here after my Return from Derbyshire.
I hope then to enjoy the happineʃs of paʃsing some
happy hours with You ------------------------------
11 o'Clock I am now my dear in the Yellow Bed Chamber,
which is to be call'd my Room. Your Sister has made me



feel quite at home, she has provided me with a
little table -- pen & Ink &c -- how I wish You were
with me at this moment. I saw Dr. Kerr yesterday
he gave me a very good account of You, but he desired
I would advise You by all means to have the tooth
that pains You drawn out, for he said it was not
proper for you to use laudanum & that if You lost
rest by suffering pain it might bring on Your old
complaints -- think of this & be advised.
Lady Wake[12] is quite recover'd, I took the opportunity of
her Father & Mother being with her to come here,
they came to C.H. yesterday, & leave her tomorrow Morng..
I shall return there to dinner. On Saturday or Sunday
Next I shall be in Town -- Lady W. will be wth. her
Children at Lord Dartreys[13] at Chelsea -- Sr. Wm.[14] goes into
Eʃsex -- they will stay about a fortnight -- I have
promised to come down wth. them -- I will tell You
when we meet the plan of our intended excursions -- into Yorkshire
Derbyshire &c &c. -- I expected to have heard from
You before this -- I hear You have been at Lady
Carlisles[15] Ball why did You not send me an account
of it to amuse my Charge? -- pray do not neglect
saying something for me very civil to Hero[16] --
I hope You have been to Chelsea -- Adieu
this is a Curious letter of scraps
Wednesday Morng. -- Horton -- prayers are just over &
I take ye. opportunity whilst Sr. R. is writing to You
to add another line, I was so sleepy last night
that I could not write half I intended -- I expect
a full account of yr. Birth day & I desire to
know how you were dreʃs'd &c &c



Sr. Robt. says this is an heavenly day -- it looks
gloomy & the Skies promise rain -- I think
they all appear in spirits & are all in health --
Adieu ma tres Chere toujours de même;
M: Hamilton


I recd. Your little letter of ye. 26th. May

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Sir Robert Gunning, 1st Baronet (1731-1816), father of Charlotte Margaret Gunning.
 2. This section is possibly written in George Gunning's hand.
 3. The remainder of page 1 is possibly written in Sir Robert Gunning's hand.
 4. Courteenhall is the ancestral home of the Wake family, only 5 or 6 miles from Horton.
 5. This section is possibly written in Isabella Gunning's hand.
 6. This section is possibly written in George Gunning's hand.
 7. This line is possibly written in Mary Hamilton's hand. The three names appear in the middle of the page, with boxed text on either side.
 8. These two lines are possibly written in Isabella Gunning's hand.
 9. Moved section (sec1) here from a box to the left of the three names. The first three lines are possibly written in George Gunning's hand, followed by three lines possibly written in Mary Hamilton's hand.
 10. Moved section (sec2) here from a box to the right of the three names. These two lines are possibly written in Isabella Gunning's hand.
 11. The remainder of the letter is written in Mary Hamilton's hand.
 12. Lady Mary Wake (née Fenton) (d. 1823), wife of Sir William Wake, 8th Baronet (1742-1785).
 13. Thomas Dawson, 1st Viscount Cremorne (1725-1813).
 14. Sir William Wake, 8th Baronet (1742-1785), husband of Lady Wake.
 15. Margaret Caroline Howard (née Leveson-Gower), Countess of Carlisle (1753-1824).
 16. 'Hero' is a code name for Charlotte Hanbury Boyle-Walsingham (née Williams) (d. 1790).

Normalised Text



Horton 3d June 1783
Tuesday Evening 9 o'Clock


      Here I am comfortably enjoying the
Society of Your Father, Brother, & Sister,
whilst You are dreading the fatigue of tomorrow,
I have ask'd for a Folio sheet, which I intend,
if I have any influence, to have fill'd for
Your amusement -- how it will answer that
intention I know not -- yet we have been
(Notwithstanding the Rain) wonderfully bright
this Afternoon -- particularly Sir Robert --

Miss Hamilton has been tiring herself to Death here -- In
the first Place when she came in, she found no Fire and thought
herself quite lost in the three comfortless Rooms especially
as the Weather towards 3 o'clock changed very much for the
worse. During Dinner she was so perished with the Cold that
she could not eat a morsel, & though we at last prevailed to
have a Fire in the eating-Room yet she was so ill used by Sir
Robert who through a very usual Absence of Mind called her
Miss Flora, that I was quite ashamed at the reception our
Guest met with -- It then began to rain violently, and when
a little after 8 it ceased, by way of shewing Miss Hamilton
the Stables &c she was dragged up to her ankles in the Wet.
We are now going to Supper and sitting very comfortably by the
Fire-side -- -- only think of that -- (I thought of you last Night
that is by the by) -- .      Miss Hamilton thinks the Suite of Rooms
horrible, old fashioned & a hundred horrible &ceteras.



I deny every thing that has been said, upon the foregoing
subject; Miss Hamilton has spent a delightful day -- she had a
very pleasant drive from Courteen Hall -- is quite enchanted with
this place -- thinks it, by far the most beautiful spot in this Country
-- the house magnificent, commodious, & surtout comfortable,
& is particularly charmed, with the numbers of dear little
round tables -- I need not tell you that our conversation has
been lively, & brilliant. Miss Hamilton has been wonderfully
entertained by my drumming upon the harpsichord -- by our
continual eloges of Flora -- & by Papas wit -- in short
it will quite break her heart, to tear herself from our delightful
society, & will only live by the hopes of soon returning to it.

Bells wit -- [Is how much in Town? I will trouble you to let me know --
How snug we are -- My Compliments to the little Worthies -- Have you been
lately in the Hotel de Ponthomme or conveyed any where in the Pink
What Nonsense I have been writing -- My -- only think of that -- ]
we underwritten beg of you to present our congratulations to their
Majesties tomorrow -- George Gunning


Mary Hamilton
Gunning
Bell Gunning

This is all a prelude
to Mary Hamiltons
comfortable Letter --

Mr. Gunning desires
me to tell You all the Warts
upon his fingers are gone --

I hope you will think
Bell Gunnings letter more comfortable


I cannot flatter my good friends by praising their
Wit -- but as they have fail'd, I have not the presumption
to suppose I should succeed, I will tell You then in plain terms my
dearest friend that I have spent a very agreeable day and
that my reception has been too pleasant not to make me
resolve to accept the friendly invitation of spending
some time here after my Return from Derbyshire.
I hope then to enjoy the happiness of passing some
happy hours with You
11 o'Clock I am now my dear in the Yellow Bed Chamber,
which is to be call'd my Room. Your Sister has made me



feel quite at home, she has provided me with a
little table -- pen & Ink &c -- how I wish You were
with me at this moment. I saw Dr. Kerr yesterday
he gave me a very good account of You, but he desired
I would advise You by all means to have the tooth
that pains You drawn out, for he said it was not
proper for you to use laudanum & that if You lost
rest by suffering pain it might bring on Your old
complaints -- think of this & be advised.
Lady Wake is quite recover'd, I took the opportunity of
her Father & Mother being with her to come here,
they came to Courteen Hall yesterday, & leave her tomorrow Morning.
I shall return there to dinner. On Saturday or Sunday
Next I shall be in Town -- Lady Wake will be with her
Children at Lord Dartreys at Chelsea -- Sir William goes into
Essex -- they will stay about a fortnight -- I have
promised to come down with them -- I will tell You
when we meet the plan of our intended excursions -- into Yorkshire
Derbyshire &c &c. -- I expected to have heard from
You before this -- I hear You have been at Lady
Carlisles Ball why did You not send me an account
of it to amuse my Charge? -- pray do not neglect
saying something for me very civil to Hero --
I hope You have been to Chelsea -- Adieu
this is a Curious letter of scraps
Wednesday Morning -- Horton -- prayers are just over &
I take the opportunity whilst Sir Robert is writing to You
to add another line, I was so sleepy last night
that I could not write half I intended -- I expect
a full account of your Birth day & I desire to
know how you were dress'd &c &c



Sir Robert says this is an heavenly day -- it looks
gloomy & the Skies promise rain -- I think
they all appear in spirits & are all in health --
Adieu ma tres Chere toujours de même;
Mary Hamilton


I received Your little letter of the 26th. May

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Sir Robert Gunning, 1st Baronet (1731-1816), father of Charlotte Margaret Gunning.
 2. This section is possibly written in George Gunning's hand.
 3. The remainder of page 1 is possibly written in Sir Robert Gunning's hand.
 4. Courteenhall is the ancestral home of the Wake family, only 5 or 6 miles from Horton.
 5. This section is possibly written in Isabella Gunning's hand.
 6. This section is possibly written in George Gunning's hand.
 7. This line is possibly written in Mary Hamilton's hand. The three names appear in the middle of the page, with boxed text on either side.
 8. These two lines are possibly written in Isabella Gunning's hand.
 9. Moved section (sec1) here from a box to the left of the three names. The first three lines are possibly written in George Gunning's hand, followed by three lines possibly written in Mary Hamilton's hand.
 10. Moved section (sec2) here from a box to the right of the three names. These two lines are possibly written in Isabella Gunning's hand.
 11. The remainder of the letter is written in Mary Hamilton's hand.
 12. Lady Mary Wake (née Fenton) (d. 1823), wife of Sir William Wake, 8th Baronet (1742-1785).
 13. Thomas Dawson, 1st Viscount Cremorne (1725-1813).
 14. Sir William Wake, 8th Baronet (1742-1785), husband of Lady Wake.
 15. Margaret Caroline Howard (née Leveson-Gower), Countess of Carlisle (1753-1824).
 16. 'Hero' is a code name for Charlotte Hanbury Boyle-Walsingham (née Williams) (d. 1790).

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Mary Hamilton to Charlotte Margaret Gunning

Shelfmark: HAM/1/15/2/25

Correspondence Details

Author: Mary Hamilton

Place sent: Horton, Bucks.

Addressee: Charlotte Margaret Gunning

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 3 June 1783

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Mary Hamilton to Charlotte Gunning. The letter is in several sections. After an introductory section by Mary Hamilton, currently staying with Gunning's family, there are light-hearted interventions by her hosts, with sections by George William Gunning, Isabella ('Bell') Barbara Evelyn Gunning and Sir Robert Gunning. The remainder of the letter is written by Hamilton from the Gunnings' family home in Horton, in which she writes of her pleasant welcome and the beautiful surrounds but still wishes Charlotte Gunning was with her. Hamilton saw Dr Kerr (see HAM/1/8/4) the previous day and he asked that she advise Gunning to have the tooth that is painful for her drawn out, as he does not see it as proper for her to use laudanum, and 'that if You lost rest by suffering pain it might bring on Your old complaints'. The letter continues with news of Lady Wake. Hamilton also complains that Gunning sent her no account of a ball she had attended.
    Dated at Horton.
    Original reference No. 22.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 949 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2014/15 and 2015/16 provided by the Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Donald Alasdair Morrison, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Research assistant: Carla Seabra-Dacosta, MA student, University of Vigo

Transliterator: Marta Nicole Maffioletti, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted November 2014)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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