Single Letter

HAM/1/19/3

Letter from Mrs Napier to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


Mrs- Napier x

Boston Octr: 19th 1768


      Nothing but want of ability to write should so long
have prevented my thanking my Dear Miʃs Hamilton for her
obligeing Letter I'm happy with the good Accounts you give Us
of yr Pappa & Mamma's Health & Congratulate them upon
haveing conquer'd their Gout & Rhumatism as for Colds I
dont fear much from them & hope both Mrs Hamilton & You
have lost the remembrance of haveing had them beffore You
can Receive this. We are very Sorry the Venison never
came to hand; proveably the Keeper had heard the Regt: had
left Northampton & so did not Kill the Buck: but we
have heard no more about it Ourselves. I'm glad Mr
Samuel is so very Indifferent about our Return as
it wont give him Uneasineʃs to know that the Troops are
order'd to remain in Lincolnshire all Winter & that the
Horses are brought from Graʃs to the different Quarters here
I must therefore beg either yr Pappa or Mamma to acquaint
Mr Samuell that we return no more to Northampton Mr
Napier would have wrote so to him but I write this from
his bed Side to which he is confined by a feverish Indis=
:position
so beg they'll give him this Information he sayd
at parting he'd paint the Parlour for his own Conveniency
whether we came back or not & did not mean going back
to the House till the end of this Month whether we came
or Not so he is still in time to do it sooner than we could
have been there had the Regt. return'd. Asure yourselves we
regreate much being so far remov'd from you & shall ever
retain the most Gratefull Sense of yr Polite & friendly
attention to Us while with You of this fact asure yr



Pappa & Mamma as well as yourself as to any thing else I had
no partiality for Northampton nor do I Sigh after Babylonish
Acquaintance Intimacy I never should have formed there but
with Yourselves: much do I wish we had been near each other
Selfish enough you'll Say when I tell you I shall want the
comfort of Agreeable friends to Nurse me when confined & to
keep up my Spiritts till that time as I lie in; in febry or
March I'm now out of all Danger from my dangerous fall, but
Suffer greatly both from Situation & Uneasineʃs of Mind Harriot
& Mary are both confined to their room mostly to bed by the
fever & Agnes Mairie has had a touch of it but we hope
she'll get it off easily we hope Mr Napier's wont last either
I've heard twice from Ruʃsia where our friends were Well &
much pleas'd with their Situation & Reception Lady Cathcart
seems in high Spiritts asure yr Pappa wt ever became of
the Letter I know my Br wrote one to him beffore he left
London because he wrote to me he had done so, to bid him
Adieu & to thank him & all of you for yr goodneʃs to Us
wch we had mention'd to him in the terms we thought it deservd
Pray is Mrs Frederick Hamilton brought to bed yet & wt has
she got? its yet uncertain whether Head Quarters may not be
fixt at Lincoln for the Winter if so we go there if not we
continue where we are Boston affords all proper Aʃsistance
for my Situation I hope soon to hear good Acts from you wt
a History of all Memorable transactions amongst You; all
our best respects attend Mr & Mrs Hamilton & Yourself yr
Cousins as well as we are Heartily sorry its like to be so
long beffore we Meet: however we hope to have that pleassure
often in some other part of the World wherever we are
our best Wishes are Yours Adieu my Dear Madam bellieve
me Ever Your Sincearly Affectionate &c &c
M A Napier

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Normalised Text



Boston October 19th 1768


      Nothing but want of ability to write should so long
have prevented my thanking my Dear Miss Hamilton for her
obliging Letter I'm happy with the good Accounts you give Us
of your Pappa & Mamma's Health & Congratulate them upon
having conquer'd their Gout & Rheumatism as for Colds I
don't fear much from them & hope both Mrs Hamilton & You
have lost the remembrance of having had them before You
can Receive this. We are very Sorry the Venison never
came to hand; provably the Keeper had heard the Regiment had
left Northampton & so did not Kill the Buck: but we
have heard no more about it Ourselves. I'm glad Mr
Samuel is so very Indifferent about our Return as
it won't give him Uneasiness to know that the Troops are
order'd to remain in Lincolnshire all Winter & that the
Horses are brought from Grass to the different Quarters here
I must therefore beg either your Pappa or Mamma to acquaint
Mr Samuel that we return no more to Northampton Mr
Napier would have wrote so to him but I write this from
his bed Side to which he is confined by a feverish Indisposition
so beg they'll give him this Information he said
at parting he'd paint the Parlour for his own Conveniency
whether we came back or not & did not mean going back
to the House till the end of this Month whether we came
or Not so he is still in time to do it sooner than we could
have been there had the Regiment return'd. Assure yourselves we
regret much being so far remov'd from you & shall ever
retain the most Grateful Sense of your Polite & friendly
attention to Us while with You of this fact assure your



Pappa & Mamma as well as yourself as to any thing else I had
no partiality for Northampton nor do I Sigh after Babylonish
Acquaintance Intimacy I never should have formed there but
with Yourselves: much do I wish we had been near each other
Selfish enough you'll Say when I tell you I shall want the
comfort of Agreeable friends to Nurse me when confined & to
keep up my Spirits till that time as I lie in; in february or
March I'm now out of all Danger from my dangerous fall, but
Suffer greatly both from Situation & Uneasiness of Mind Harriot
& Mary are both confined to their room mostly to bed by the
fever & Agnes Mairie has had a touch of it but we hope
she'll get it off easily we hope Mr Napier's won't last either
I've heard twice from Russia where our friends were Well &
much pleas'd with their Situation & Reception Lady Cathcart
seems in high Spirits assure your Pappa what ever became of
the Letter I know my Brother wrote one to him before he left
London because he wrote to me he had done so, to bid him
Adieu & to thank him & all of you for your goodness to Us
which we had mention'd to him in the terms we thought it deserved
Pray is Mrs Frederick Hamilton brought to bed yet & what has
she got? its yet uncertain whether Head Quarters may not be
fixed at Lincoln for the Winter if so we go there if not we
continue where we are Boston affords all proper Assistance
for my Situation I hope soon to hear good Accounts from you with
a History of all Memorable transactions amongst You; all
our best respects attend Mr & Mrs Hamilton & Yourself your
Cousins as well as we are Heartily sorry its like to be so
long before we Meet: however we hope to have that pleassure
often in some other part of the World wherever we are
our best Wishes are Yours Adieu my Dear Madam believe
me Ever Your Sincerely Affectionate &c &c
Mary Ann Napier

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Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Mrs Napier to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/19/3

Correspondence Details

Author: Lady Mary Ann Napier (née Cathcart)

Place sent: Boston

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: Northampton (certainty: high)

Date sent: 19 October 1768

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Mary Anne Napier [later Lady Napier] to Mary Hamilton. She regrets that they are so far separated from one another. She will 'want the comfort of Agreeable friends to Nurse me when confined & to keep up my Spirits till that time as I lie in', in February or March. She is now out of danger following her fall, but admits that she 'Suffer[s] greatly both from Situation & Uneasiness of Mind'. She has heard twice from Lady Cathcart in Russia, 'where our friends were Well & much pleas'd with their Situation & Reception' [her husband was ambassador in St Petersburg]. Napier is uncertain whether her husband's regiment will take up winter quarters in Lincoln or remain in Boston.
    Dated at Boston, [Lincolnshire].
   

Length: 1 sheet, 664 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2017/18 provided by Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Georgia Tutt, MA student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Asim Ramzan, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2018)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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