Single Letter

HAM/1/2/21

Journal-letter from John Dickenson to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


7

12th July -- 1789 --
      I sent you a letter to day -- it never ceased to rain except at 2 OClock
for 10 minutes, from the time I got up till 4 when Sir Robt. & Mr. Sawille
came, Mrs. Davies gave us a very pretty dinner & I provided a desert
of Fruit, which I knew they liked -- they staid with me till 7- & after
drinking Tea I accompanied them into Gay Street to Mrs. Bowdler's
Sir Robt. asked me if he cd. be of any service to me in Paris, I told him
that I had a particular commiʃsion to give him -- "& pray what is it?["]
to take care to bring back your Wife & Daughter safe, that I may have
the pleasure of seeing them in the Spring -- There were at the
Vanbrughs Lady Mary Blair & her Daughter, who has a very
fine countenance, but is so large & fat, that her Neck is like a
young Womans of 16 -- a Mr. & Mrs. Poulter who is the person
I mentioned to you, as having a likneʃs to Ly De Vesci, She has
been married 8 Years & has only 10 Children, if I had been a
Roman Catholick I should have croʃsed my self at the Idea --
Miʃs Hay -- sister to Lord Kinnoul)[1] -- Mrs. L--- -- Mr. Villiers. Groom
of the B.C. to the King -- Mr. Gibbon a young man & a Mr. Sandford --
we spent a very pleasant Evg. which paʃsed in lively conversation --
& at ½ past 10 sat down to a Supper which you will conclude
was elegant -- There were all sorts of Fruits &c &c -- I forgot a Mr-
Berg, who was in the Law & is an agent to Mr. V. for the Opera
busineʃs -- he talked a great deal about the fire at that place &
made it very clear that it was set on fire & he did not hesitate to
say by whom -- there is the most positive presumptive proof
but they cannot yet bring it home to them -- after Supper the
word Anthem was mentioned -- Mrs. V. who's manner you are
acquainted, begged that Mr. Sandford would favor us with an
Anthem, which he did, after a due preparation of hemming and
coughing -- but I cannot call it a serious Anthem -- for it
was the drollest Medley I ever heard -- it was very long & kept
us on a roar the whole time -- I forgot to tell you that the
Fire at Opera has clarified Mrs. Van's Ears & entirely cured her
Deafneʃs -- They dont expect to lose any thing -- I came home
before 12 -- /13/ -- Sir Robt. Herries set out this morning for Lon-
don
-- This has been an extraordinary day of rain which has
fallen in torrents with very little intermiʃsion -- at 6 I
was able to go to Dr. Fothergills where I found a Mr. Willis
who made many enquiries after after you & said a great many
civil things -- he lives in the house adjoining to the Drs- -- There was
also a Mr. Clavering & another man who was a very odd figure --
he is 6 foot high & thin -- he has a ruddy complexion, grey Eyes
with large Eye brows of the deepest red, his Wig perfectly white to



to
set them off -- and a mouth distended nearly from Ear to Ear, with
a set of large, shapeleʃs, dirty Teeth placed zig zag acroʃs this monstrous
Fiʃsure -- This person talked a great deal with wonderful & profound
found
deliberation & was very decided in his Opinions -- the Dr.
smiled & seemed much pleased with my Visit -- The rain, which
never ceased whilst I was there, detained me till past 9, when I was
obliged to venture thro it -- 14/ I met Mr. Willis at the pump
Room & he introduced me to his Wife & he preʃsed me to call upon him
which I promised to do -- The post brought me two Letters
this morning one from Grandpapa at Manr. with a ten pound
Note inclosed, for which, I beg you will return him my
thanks, as he ordered me to acknowledge the receipt of it to
you & pray inform him as he is anxious about my health, that I feel
myself, for the last 3 days in perfect health -- the only draw back is a
little Rash upon my left Arm, which itches most intolerably --
every person compliments me upon the clarification of my Com-
plexion
& as far as I can judge, I never looked better -- the Weather
is much against me, but I ought not to complain, when thousands
suffer infinitely more from it than myself -- The other Letter
came from your Uncle, I believe now I may stile him Mine -- [2]

      "Dear Sir -- on my return from the Opera late on Saturday night
I found your very obliging letter, which would otherwise have been answer
ed
by return of post. I am sorry my Letter to Mrs. D. should have
conveyed the Idea that by your continuing at Bath, the time you had
fixed for so material an object as your health; I might be exposed
to a disappointment in the busineʃs of raising the money for my Son's
Use, as I certainly imagined that if the Bond or Deed was executed at
the time mentioned for your return, it would come soon enough.
In Scotland Money is to be had only at certain periods, for instance
Lammas or the 1st of August is one of them, & if that paʃses it cannot
be done till the next which is Martin mas or the 1st of November.
It is uncertain when a Vacancy may happen in the Regt. perhaps
it may not till it would be perfectly convenient to me: but as I am
rather of a punctual disposition, I could wish to be prepared to
receive the offer, which I am told is a very great favor. This being
the case, I can with difficulty find words to expreʃs the Sense
of the obligation I feel myself under to you, for generous confidence
in me, in making me such an Offer without the smallest parade;
the favor done me on your part is most complete; & the remembrance
of it on mine will I trust be corresponding. I hope my Agent
will be able to supply me; for your diverting such a Sum from the
purpose you have allotted it, for even a small period of time, might
I [am] well aware be attended with a material inconvenience to you, & having
found you so zealous in my Interest, I cannot be too scrupulous
in my Attention to yours, I must therefore with a thousand



Thanks to you decline putting so heavy a Tax upon your friendship.
I every day expect my Son home, & as you are so Kind, as to interest
yourself in this matter, I shall not fail to acquaint you how it
proceeds, for I shall be always happy in every opportunity of aʃsuring
you with how much truth I am Dear Sir
                                                         Your faithful & Obliged hble Servant
F. H.

July 13.1789[3]
P.S. Mr. Greville is going out of Town, having parted with his house
so that you will please not to send any more Letters under cover to him."
      I see great pleasure from this letter as I know that it will make
you very happy -- it appears that he was astonished at the confidence
which I placed in him, & to find, that I proposed to do him a great
Act of friendship, without any profeʃsions, was what the natu-
ral
coldneʃs of his heart probabily would have prevented his
doing in a similar situation -- I aʃsure you it gives me [v]ery
great satisfaction to know that I have had it in my pow[er]
to oblige him -- & am agreeably flattered by the warmth of his
Acknowledgments -- I shall write to him again very soon
for perhaps it may be neceʃsary for him to have ye- money
for a short time -- The Major & I breakfasted with Sawille
who sets out to day for Teignmouth -- Sir Robt. meets him
there & goes in a few days to Paris -- Mr. S. said he had propo.
sed
[to] Sir R. to accompany him, instead of Ly H., but
h[e di]d not consent to it -- If Ld. Milton shd. luckily
be a[t] Weymouth -- Sawille promised to return
here and be in the same house with us. otherwise he goes to him
We have had a fair morning & rather warm -- at 1. I walked with
the Major, we had a very pleasant & interesting conversation -- which
continued on our return home till his Servant broke in upon us
to let us know that it was 4 OClock -- I discovered that he is the
second Son of Secretary Murray -- a certain Subject. was, you may
suppose, not paʃsed over in Silence, on which we compared Notes
At 8 OClock I went, by appointment to Mrs. Hartley's -- Mrs- Holroyd
came there soon [af]ter me -- I enquired after Mrs. Henry, who is in
a very bad sta[te] of health -- we did not quarrel -- by way of
encouragement Mrs. H. gave us a very pretty Supper & we took
our leave before eleven -- Mrs- Hartley was so obliging as to shew
me the method of coloring, & recommended a person in this
town who draws in a very masterly stile to give me a few leʃsons
as you expreʃsed a wish to that purpose -- You must take
care my dearest friend how you venture to expreʃs yr- wishes
as they shall always be gratified as far as lays in my power.
we have had a good deal of rain this afternoon -- 1415th/ This morning I
got up at 5 OClock on purpose to write to you & finished yr- U's letter
before I went to drink the Waters -- I have since breakfast called upon



The drawing Master and           [4]have fixed with him to take ------
leʃsons -- & I must endeavor           to find time for it -- Mr. Earle called
upon me yesterday to take leave, I luckily met him at the Door -- this
morning I called, but they were too busy to admit me -- I ran over to
the Rundells -- Mrs. R. desired me to tell you, that She was very
sorry to find from my looks there was now no hopes of yr- being
a Widow soon -- She desired her Love -- Another wet day -- what
will become of us -- I am sorry to add to my expences this year
& to take any more money out of our purse for my own gratifica-
tion
-- yet I shd. be obliged to you to send to Garside of Stockport to
procure me a License -- I shd. not like to give up entirely my old
amusement -- tho I wd. lay a wager that I shall fiddle ten times as
much as shoot -- I have been listening for the Postman, but
I cant make him come, to bring me News of my dear Louisa's
Mama -- Here is a delightful walk just finished from the[5]

Queen's parade behind Gay Street & Brock Street to the Cres-
cent
. The walk is 16 feet wide of excellent Gravel, & is now become
the fashionable promenade & how delighted I shd. be to amuse
my self with Louisa on this place -- I shall not venture
to visit Miʃs More Dr. Stonehouse &c till the weather is better
as I'm obliged to use every precaution to prevent my taking cold --
The Ld. Lieutenant is our next Neighbor -- he looks in perfect
health -- I think you will be heartily tired of reading
all this Nonsense & to oblige you will subscribe my self
Your affectionate Husband -- J.D -- [6]
I am obliged to Wm. for selling the most unpleasant horse I ever
poʃseʃsed -- A[die]u Dieu vous garde ma tres chere femme et notre fille --





To
Mrs. Dickenson[7]
Taxal
Chapel le Frith
Derbyshire[8]
X Post[9]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Probably Thomas Hay, ninth earl of Kinnoull (1710–1787) (ODNB).
 2. Dickenson quotes almost verbatim an entire letter (apart from the closing dateline) received from Frederick Hamilton, HAM/1/4/2/6.
 3. This line appears to the left of the closing salutation.
 4. Spaces in this line and next left blank, perhaps for seal.
 5. Moved this passage here from the lower half of p.3, below the address when unfolded.
 6. This passage appears at the top of p.3, above the address when unfolded.
 7. Postmark 'BATH' to right of address when unfolded.
 8. Moved address panel here from centre of p.3 when unfolded, written vertically.
 9. This line appears to the left of 'Derbyshire', above when unfolded.

Normalised Text



July -- 1789 --
      I sent you a letter to day -- it never ceased to rain except at 2 OClock
for 10 minutes, from the time I got up till 4 when Sir Robert & Mr. Saville
came, Mrs. Davies gave us a very pretty dinner & I provided a dessert
of Fruit, which I knew they liked -- they stayed with me till 7- & after
drinking Tea I accompanied them into Gay Street to Mrs. Bowdler's
Sir Robert asked me if he could be of any service to me in Paris, I told him
that I had a particular commission to give him -- "& pray what is it?"
to take care to bring back your Wife & Daughter safe, that I may have
the pleasure of seeing them in the Spring -- There were at the
Vanbrughs Lady Mary Blair & her Daughter, who has a very
fine countenance, but is so large & fat, that her Neck is like a
young Womans of 16 -- a Mr. & Mrs. Poulter who is the person
I mentioned to you, as having a likeness to Lady De Vesci, She has
been married 8 Years & has only 10 Children, if I had been a
Roman Catholic I should have crossed my self at the Idea --
Miss Hay -- sister to Lord Kinnoull) -- Mrs. L--- -- Mr. Villiers. Groom
of the Bedchamber to the King -- Mr. Gibbon a young man & a Mr. Sandford --
we spent a very pleasant Evening which passed in lively conversation --
& at ½ past 10 sat down to a Supper which you will conclude
was elegant -- There were all sorts of Fruits &c &c -- I forgot a Mr-
Berg, who was in the Law & is an agent to Mr. Vanbrugh for the Opera
business -- he talked a great deal about the fire at that place &
made it very clear that it was set on fire & he did not hesitate to
say by whom -- there is the most positive presumptive proof
but they cannot yet bring it home to them -- after Supper the
word Anthem was mentioned -- Mrs. Vanbrugh whose manner you are
acquainted, begged that Mr. Sandford would favor us with an
Anthem, which he did, after a due preparation of hemming and
coughing -- but I cannot call it a serious Anthem -- for it
was the drollest Medley I ever heard -- it was very long & kept
us on a roar the whole time -- I forgot to tell you that the
Fire at Opera has clarified Mrs. Vanbrugh's Ears & entirely cured her
Deafness -- They dont expect to lose any thing -- I came home
before 12 -- /13/ -- Sir Robert Herries set out this morning for London
-- This has been an extraordinary day of rain which has
fallen in torrents with very little intermission -- at 6 I
was able to go to Dr. Fothergills where I found a Mr. Willis
who made many enquiries after you & said a great many
civil things -- he lives in the house adjoining to the Doctors -- There was
also a Mr. Clavering & another man who was a very odd figure --
he is 6 foot high & thin -- he has a ruddy complexion, grey Eyes
with large Eye brows of the deepest red, his Wig perfectly white to


set them off -- and a mouth distended nearly from Ear to Ear, with
a set of large, shapeless, dirty Teeth placed zig zag across this monstrous
Fissure -- This person talked a great deal with wonderful & profound
deliberation & was very decided in his Opinions -- the Dr.
smiled & seemed much pleased with my Visit -- The rain, which
never ceased whilst I was there, detained me till past 9, when I was
obliged to venture through it -- 14/ I met Mr. Willis at the pump
Room & he introduced me to his Wife & he pressed me to call upon him
which I promised to do -- The post brought me two Letters
this morning one from Grandpapa at Manchester with a ten pound
Note enclosed, for which, I beg you will return him my
thanks, as he ordered me to acknowledge the receipt of it to
you & pray inform him as he is anxious about my health, that I feel
myself, for the last 3 days in perfect health -- the only drawback is a
little Rash upon my left Arm, which itches most intolerably --
every person compliments me upon the clarification of my Complexion
& as far as I can judge, I never looked better -- the Weather
is much against me, but I ought not to complain, when thousands
suffer infinitely more from it than myself -- The other Letter
came from your Uncle, I believe now I may style him Mine --

      "Dear Sir -- on my return from the Opera late on Saturday night
I found your very obliging letter, which would otherwise have been answered
by return of post. I am sorry my Letter to Mrs. Dickenson should have
conveyed the Idea that by your continuing at Bath, the time you had
fixed for so material an object as your health; I might be exposed
to a disappointment in the business of raising the money for my Son's
Use, as I certainly imagined that if the Bond or Deed was executed at
the time mentioned for your return, it would come soon enough.
In Scotland Money is to be had only at certain periods, for instance
Lammas or the 1st of August is one of them, & if that passes it cannot
be done till the next which is Martin mas or the 1st of November.
It is uncertain when a Vacancy may happen in the Regiment perhaps
it may not till it would be perfectly convenient to me: but as I am
rather of a punctual disposition, I could wish to be prepared to
receive the offer, which I am told is a very great favor. This being
the case, I can with difficulty find words to express the Sense
of the obligation I feel myself under to you, for generous confidence
in me, in making me such an Offer without the smallest parade;
the favor done me on your part is most complete; & the remembrance
of it on mine will I trust be corresponding. I hope my Agent
will be able to supply me; for your diverting such a Sum from the
purpose you have allotted it, for even a small period of time, might
I am well aware be attended with a material inconvenience to you, & having
found you so zealous in my Interest, I cannot be too scrupulous
in my Attention to yours, I must therefore with a thousand



Thanks to you decline putting so heavy a Tax upon your friendship.
I every day expect my Son home, & as you are so Kind, as to interest
yourself in this matter, I shall not fail to acquaint you how it
proceeds, for I shall be always happy in every opportunity of assuring
you with how much truth I am Dear Sir
                                                         Your faithful & Obliged humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

July 13.1789
P.S. Mr. Greville is going out of Town, having parted with his house
so that you will please not to send any more Letters under cover to him."
      I see great pleasure from this letter as I know that it will make
you very happy -- it appears that he was astonished at the confidence
which I placed in him, & to find, that I proposed to do him a great
Act of friendship, without any professions, was what the natural coldness of his heart probably would have prevented his
doing in a similar situation -- I assure you it gives me very
great satisfaction to know that I have had it in my power
to oblige him -- & am agreeably flattered by the warmth of his
Acknowledgements -- I shall write to him again very soon
for perhaps it may be necessary for him to have the money
for a short time -- The Major & I breakfasted with Saville
who sets out to day for Teignmouth -- Sir Robert meets him
there & goes in a few days to Paris -- Mr. Saville said he had proposed
to Sir Robert to accompany him, instead of Lady H., but
he did not consent to it -- If Lord Milton should luckily
be at Weymouth -- Saville promised to return
here and be in the same house with us. otherwise he goes to him
We have had a fair morning & rather warm -- at 1. I walked with
the Major, we had a very pleasant & interesting conversation -- which
continued on our return home till his Servant broke in upon us
to let us know that it was 4 OClock -- I discovered that he is the
second Son of Secretary Murray -- a certain Subject. was, you may
suppose, not passed over in Silence, on which we compared Notes
At 8 OClock I went, by appointment to Mrs. Hartley's -- Mrs- Holroyd
came there soon after me -- I enquired after Mrs. Henry, who is in
a very bad state of health -- we did not quarrel -- by way of
encouragement Mrs. Hartley gave us a very pretty Supper & we took
our leave before eleven -- Mrs- Hartley was so obliging as to shew
me the method of coloring, & recommended a person in this
town who draws in a very masterly style to give me a few lessons
as you expressed a wish to that purpose -- You must take
care my dearest friend how you venture to express your wishes
as they shall always be gratified as far as lays in my power.
we have had a good deal of rain this afternoon -- 15th/ This morning I
got up at 5 OClock on purpose to write to you & finished your Uncle's letter
before I went to drink the Waters -- I have since breakfast called upon



The drawing Master and           have fixed with him to take ------
lessons -- & I must endeavor           to find time for it -- Mr. Earle called
upon me yesterday to take leave, I luckily met him at the Door -- this
morning I called, but they were too busy to admit me -- I ran over to
the Rundells -- Mrs. Rundell desired me to tell you, that She was very
sorry to find from my looks there was now no hopes of your being
a Widow soon -- She desired her Love -- Another wet day -- what
will become of us -- I am sorry to add to my expenses this year
& to take any more money out of our purse for my own gratification
-- yet I should be obliged to you to send to Garside of Stockport to
procure me a Licence -- I should not like to give up entirely my old
amusement -- though I would lay a wager that I shall fiddle ten times as
much as shoot -- I have been listening for the Postman, but
I can't make him come, to bring me News of my dear Louisa's
Mama -- Here is a delightful walk just finished from the

Queen's parade behind Gay Street & Brock Street to the Crescent
. The walk is 16 feet wide of excellent Gravel, & is now become
the fashionable promenade & how delighted I should be to amuse
my self with Louisa on this place -- I shall not venture
to visit Miss More Dr. Stonehouse &c till the weather is better
as I'm obliged to use every precaution to prevent my taking cold --
The Lord Lieutenant is our next Neighbor -- he looks in perfect
health -- I think you will be heartily tired of reading
all this Nonsense & to oblige you will subscribe my self
Your affectionate Husband -- John Dickenson --
I am obliged to Wm. for selling the most unpleasant horse I ever
possessed -- Adieu Dieu vous garde ma très chère femme et notre fille --





To
Mrs. Dickenson
Taxal
Chapel le Frith
Derbyshire
X Post

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Probably Thomas Hay, ninth earl of Kinnoull (1710–1787) (ODNB).
 2. Dickenson quotes almost verbatim an entire letter (apart from the closing dateline) received from Frederick Hamilton, HAM/1/4/2/6.
 3. This line appears to the left of the closing salutation.
 4. Spaces in this line and next left blank, perhaps for seal.
 5. Moved this passage here from the lower half of p.3, below the address when unfolded.
 6. This passage appears at the top of p.3, above the address when unfolded.
 7. Postmark 'BATH' to right of address when unfolded.
 8. Moved address panel here from centre of p.3 when unfolded, written vertically.
 9. This line appears to the left of 'Derbyshire', above when unfolded.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Journal-letter from John Dickenson to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/2/21

Correspondence Details

Author: John Dickenson

Place sent: Bath

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: Taxal, Chapel-en-le-Frith

Date sent: 14 July 1789

Letter Description

Summary: Journal-letter from John Dickenson to his wife Mary née Hamilton covering the period 12-14 July 1789. The letter relates to Dickenson's time in Bath. He writes on the Pump Room, his health and his social life and the people he meets. He also copies a letter written to him by Hamilton's uncle Frederick Hamilton relating to his niece's bond.
    Original reference No. 7.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 1983 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2017/18 provided by Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Georgia Tutt, MA student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Emily Ducat, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2018)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 2 April 2020

Document Image (pdf)