Single Letter

HAM/1/2/31

Letter from John Dickenson to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


12

12

10th. Decbr. 1790
Buxton

My dearest Love
      I have sent your Letter
to Lord Stormont -- The family party
are gone to look at the Crescent &c --
S. tells me Cr. was very Amorous in
the Chaise -- I could not sleep for
thinking about it last night -- it is
certainly an interesting Subject to
us all -- & I am as certain will take
place. I'm sure the parties will
agree in time & I do believe le pere[1]
would by no means object to it -- tho
I think he has no idea of it at present --
      I am delighted to hear that you
are in good spirits my charming
Wife, on your happineʃs solely depends



that of yr Affectionate Husband --
      I forgot to order the Taylors to
provide for the Tennants dinner on
Tuesday next -- In case I cannot return
by that day I would not have them
disappointed -- let them dine comfort-
ably
together & pay their rents when
I come home --      I am certainly
better, but I have written to Hall --
to know if what I am doing is right
for I begin to think my Complaint
is owing to fatigue -- too great relax
ation
already -- & shall wait for his
Ansr --      They are just returned
Cr. charmed with the Crescent -- "If I
stay till Summer I will come here"
not a word of going in April -- pas, pas, pas --



Louisa is very charming and makes her
Grandpere into a great Noodle.[2]
Addio
Mia molto cara Sposa
Io sono vostre
Affettuosamente
JD




Mrs. Dickenson.

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Elizabeth's father, John Dickenson Sr.
 2. 'A stupid or silly person; a fool, an idiot (OED s.v. noodle n.1, 1).

Normalised Text





My dearest Love
      I have sent your Letter
to Lord Stormont -- The family party
are gone to look at the Crescent &c --
Sarah tells me Chevalier was very Amorous in
the Chaise -- I could not sleep for
thinking about it last night -- it is
certainly an interesting Subject to
us all -- & I am as certain will take
place. I'm sure the parties will
agree in time & I do believe le père
would by no means object to it -- though
I think he has no idea of it at present --
      I am delighted to hear that you
are in good spirits my charming
Wife, on your happiness solely depends



that of your Affectionate Husband --
      I forgot to order the Taylors to
provide for the Tenants dinner on
Tuesday next -- In case I cannot return
by that day I would not have them
disappointed -- let them dine comfortably
together & pay their rents when
I come home --      I am certainly
better, but I have written to Hall --
to know if what I am doing is right
for I begin to think my Complaint
is owing to fatigue -- too great relaxation
already -- & shall wait for his
Answer --      They are just returned
Chevalier charmed with the Crescent -- "If I
stay till Summer I will come here"
not a word of going in April -- pas, pas, pas --



Louisa is very charming and makes her
Grandpere into a great Noodle.
Addio
Mia molto cara Sposa
Io sono vostre
Affettuosamente
John Dickenson




Mrs. Dickenson.

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Elizabeth's father, John Dickenson Sr.
 2. 'A stupid or silly person; a fool, an idiot (OED s.v. noodle n.1, 1).

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from John Dickenson to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/2/31

Correspondence Details

Author: John Dickenson

Place sent: Buxton

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: Taxal, Chapel-en-le-Frith (certainty: medium)

Date sent: 10 December 1790

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from John Dickenson to his wife Mary née Hamilton. The letter relates to the health of Dickenson, who feels that his illness may be caused by fatigue. He has written to his doctor to ask his opinion.
    Original reference No. 12.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 250 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2016/17 provided by The John Rylands Research Institute.

Research assistant: Sarah Connor, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Chi Wang, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2017)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 2 April 2020

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