Single Letter

HAM/1/2/36

Letter from John Dickenson to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


17.

17.

Wherwell 23. Apl. 94


      I am happy ma tres chere amie to date
my letter to you from this place, I came
here to dinner yesterday & recd. that kind of
welcome reception which affords you & I so
much gratification -- Mr. Iremonger[1] looks
vastly well & is very little lame at least much
leʃs so than I expected -- Mrs. I a little aged Mr.
Leʃs; I. looking vastly well, his daughter is
an uncommon size for her Age & xtremely
lusty -- Miʃs I is very indifferent, she took an
airing in an open carriage lately & caught
cold, & is very feverish & looks ill -- I am now
writing in her room -- & am desired to present
her best Compts. to you -- Mr. Lethclier is here
as you will see by the Cover & a Mr & Mrs
Tighe
niece to Mrs. I. -- The Newspapers



arrived at Breakfast & have brought us charm
ing
tidings from the Duke of York -- I feel
exceʃsively rejoiced that he has done something
so creditable, at least he has the merit of
an extraodinary Action in which we lost
so few Men & only one Officer -- it will be a
very great gratification to the King and
a fine stimulant to the luke warm in this
country -- I am glad too that the Emperor was
present at an Action which succeeded so
well -- Martinique too has surrendered
& forces are detached against Guadaloupe
& St. Lucia -- & our forces are now bombarding
Bastia the capital of Corsica -- I hope
we shall do well & before the end of the Year
sit down quietly in peace -- Another division
of Poland is expected -- that is a villainous
busineʃs -- I delivered Mrs. Preston's



meʃsage to Mrs. I -- I mean to set out for
Windsor tomorrow morng & shall sleep tomorrow
night at Bagshot as I cannot reach
Windsor in one day -- When I get there I
shall certainly have the pleasure of receiving
a letter from my ------ & I hope with
good Accts. of you all -- I will write to
you from thence -- This place looks
just as formerly. every body & every thing appear
comfortable & happy & as the french say --
peace & plenty is the order of the day poor
Dad is not here -- he was so drunken that he
was obliged to be dismiʃsed -- A Boy that
was brought up here now lives wh- Mr. Bower
as batman -- by whom the I.s had heard
of the sale of Taxal -- I did not forget
but I omitted to bring my Spurs which I
felt the want of yesterday & I don't at
this moment recollect any thing that I wish



to say to you except that I love you dearly.
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(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. A Mrs Ironmonger is mentioned in HAM/1/15/1/31; unknown whether the intended reference is to the same family.

Normalised Text




Wherwell 23. April 1794


      I am happy ma très chère amie to date
my letter to you from this place, I came
here to dinner yesterday & received that kind of
welcome reception which affords you & I so
much gratification -- Mr. Iremonger looks
vastly well & is very little lame at least much
less so than I expected -- Mrs. Iremonger a little aged Mr.
Less; Iremonger looking vastly well, his daughter is
an uncommon size for her Age & extremely
lusty -- Miss Iremonger is very indifferent, she took an
airing in an open carriage lately & caught
cold, & is very feverish & looks ill -- I am now
writing in her room -- & am desired to present
her best Compliments to you -- Mr. Lethclier is here
as you will see by the Cover & a Mr & Mrs
Tighe
niece to Mrs. Iremonger -- The Newspapers



arrived at Breakfast & have brought us charming
tidings from the Duke of York -- I feel
excessively rejoiced that he has done something
so creditable, at least he has the merit of
an extraodinary Action in which we lost
so few Men & only one Officer -- it will be a
very great gratification to the King and
a fine stimulant to the luke warm in this
country -- I am glad too that the Emperor was
present at an Action which succeeded so
well -- Martinique too has surrendered
& forces are detached against Guadeloupe
& St. Lucia -- & our forces are now bombarding
Bastia the capital of Corsica -- I hope
we shall do well & before the end of the Year
sit down quietly in peace -- Another division
of Poland is expected -- that is a villainous
business -- I delivered Mrs. Preston's



message to Mrs. Iremonger -- I mean to set out for
Windsor tomorrow morning & shall sleep tomorrow
night at Bagshot as I cannot reach
Windsor in one day -- When I get there I
shall certainly have the pleasure of receiving
a letter from my ------ & I hope with
good Accounts of you all -- I will write to
you from thence -- This place looks
just as formerly. every body & every thing appear
comfortable & happy & as the french say --
peace & plenty is the order of the day poor
Dad is not here -- he was so drunken that he
was obliged to be dismissed -- A Boy that
was brought up here now lives with Mr. Bower
as batman -- by whom the Iremongers had heard
of the sale of Taxal -- I did not forget
but I omitted to bring my Spurs which I
felt the want of yesterday & I don't at
this moment recollect any thing that I wish



to say to you except that I love you dearly.

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. A Mrs Ironmonger is mentioned in HAM/1/15/1/31; unknown whether the intended reference is to the same family.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from John Dickenson to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/2/36

Correspondence Details

Author: John Dickenson

Place sent: Wherwell

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 23 April 1794

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from John Dickenson to his wife Mary née Hamilton. He writes of Hamilton's friends, including the Iremongers (see HAM/1/8/1).
    Original reference No. 17.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 456 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2017/18 provided by Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Georgia Tutt, MA student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Parisa Hallgate, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2018)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 2 April 2020

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