Single Letter

HAM/1/2/45

Letter from John Dickenson to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


3

1813

Saturday
Oakford 4 Sepr 13

Miʃs Perkin came home to dinner on Wednesday looking
very blooming & I was happy to see her in such good health
James was gone out with a Mr. Dayvy the Clergyman
of Bampton a person who was much esteemed by the
late Mr. Perkin -- he has obligingly lent me a good
old Pointer. Mr. D. is a great Fisherman -- Mr. D. went
home in the Evg when it rained very hard --
Thursday -- We went out a shooting -- a Mr. Bere
pronounced commonly Bear -- joined us wh- two indif -
ferent
Dogs -- he is the young man for whom James
holds a Living -- We only found 4 Birds. I got a Shot
& miʃsed -- The Corn is not ripe upon these hills & is
uncommonly late this Year -- So that Shooting here
is out of the question at present -- We had a hot walk
& rather tiresome -- After dinner I went down to the River
about a Mile & half from here & had very good sport in
fishing -- There is a beautiful River meandering there
a most enchanting Vale & the Sides of the hills covered to
their Summit with wood -- James laments grievously
that I was not here on Friday when their was a Stag Chase
& the Stag was found within a Mile of this place -- There



is a great many wild Deer in this immense chain of Woods
that are hunted at this Season & the Chase is commonly att
ended
by 100 or 150 Horsemen & the hills covered wh- Infantry
to see & hear the Sport for the Echo from the Concert of a large
pack of Hounds is very exhilarating -- I understand that
the Stag before he leaves Cover himself endeavours to drive
out the Ladies belonging to his Harem & selfishly tries to
secure his lordly majority -- at this Season the Hinds are
not hunted as they have young ones -- On monday I am
to partake of this Sport as the Hunt meet 7 miles off
very luckily as I wish to see a pecularity of this Country --
      Friday -- After breakfast James & I set out for Tiverton 9 miles
from home -- just as we were going Mr. Dayvy called & good humordly
went wh- us & aʃsisted James in pointing out the beautiful Skylarks
to me -- We rode thro the Woods & in many places the Vistas
are like Enchantment -- Nothing can be be more beautiful. A
Road is now making along this Valley which will be
nearly flat all the way from here to Exeter & on the other
side up the vale to --                [1]Two miles -- commanding
this beautiful Scenery -- the Hill from the river to this place
will be mended -- it is at present rather steep or so & the road
covered wh- leaf stems -- We went to Tiverton on one side of this
valley & returned on the other -- We saw the old Church at T.
There is an Altarpiece by Cosway[2] -- The Angel appearing to Peter, a
good picture -- The outside of the Church is ornamented wh- carved
work & a great many Ships with Coats of Arms -- Adjoining the
Church Yard is the remains of an old Castle & the family Seat of the
Carews[3] & about a mile from the town I was shown the house where



More Carew[4] joined the Gypsies -- The school at T. is upon a large Establishmt.
There are 180 Boys all boarded in the House -- Whilst our Horses were feeding
we walked -- J. & I to the Hays at Collinpriest ½ mile from the Town -- Mr
Hay & Ly Mary were out -- At T. I had a specimen of Devonshire
Honesty -- I bought a pound of Gunpowder & tendered a two pound
Note -- The Shopkeeper who is to be the Mayor & a temporary dispenser
of Justice took out a handful of notes & in the middle picked out
one & gave it to me -- I observed it had seen service, as it was very
dirty & torn, but I thought it was selected for me as a Bank
of England Note in lieu of the Country Banks wch- paʃs here -- We went
to another Shop to buy a chip Hat & I gave the
Note the man said he had no change -- however
he went out to procure it & on his return
requested I would change the Note as it was a forged one -- So James & [I]
packed off to his approaching Worships & I desired him to change
the Note when he turned to a Boy in the shop & said -- "Did not I ask
you before where you got this Note" which shewed that he knew
he was paʃsing a bad Note & was guilty of forgery in giving it to a
Stranger -- Just as we reached home Mr. Bere joined us and
dined with us -- After dinner James insisted on my going a fishing
as I had said I would & in Mrs. & Miʃs P. walked with me to the River
I only caught 3 as they were not in the humour to take the fly --
I have not had such a ride for some Years as this day -- it seems odd
for me to talk of a ride of 20 miles -- & I saw such a Dog Oh how Louisa
wd- have exclaimed what a beauty -- Moses is not to be compared to it --
At Tiverton there is a family of Dickinsons who are rich & Sir -- D---
      I found a defect in my Rod & paid a Man in Town /The greatest coxcomical
puppy I ever met with something like Magin Esqr/ too much money for
the repair of it & when I came to use it I found he had charged me for
doing Nothing to it -- Mr. Dayvy said he would send me two Rods for
my loss -- He is a good humoured man a good Edition of James Lord -- The very
worst preacher in England -- uses z for s on all occasions[5] & what is very
singular he can read any book but the Scriptures very well -- Saturday



we had a great deal of Rain last Night -- Whilst we were at breakfast
the two rods came from Mr. D. They are made on a better principle than
mine & have skrews to fasten the joints -- I shall go a fishing by & by
but shall wait first till the old Lady comes from Bampton as I hope she
will bring me a letter from You -- The great exercise this week agrees with


me very well & I never was better in my life -- Mrs. P. has just shown
me a fine Collection of useful & ornamental China -- It is a very comfortable
House -- a good Drawing & Dining Room a large paʃsage & large Servts. Hall
another Sitting Room & a very pretty Garden -- It is now settled
that James & I set out on Tuesday next, I am Miʃs P.'s poney, & go to Exeter
& from there to Exmouth -- Dawlish &c & see what we can see for 3 or 4 days
wind & weather permitting -- I must say every thing that is kind fm-
hence -- Mrs. P. seems very happy to have me here & it will do her good -- She
has suffered greatly in Mind & Body for the last 12 Months -- She has lost
one Eye & has a tumour settled in her face -- Mr. P. was a very handsome Man
here is an excellent picture of him by Opie & another extraordinary likeness of Mr. P. by
him & a fine picture of an old Beggar. Mr. P. gave Opie a Guinea for it & refused 100 --
Cosway was a Native of this place & means to be buried here -- James says he

James says he won't bury him if he does not pre
sent
the Church where he was christened with an Altar
piece
-- Adieu --                12 Yr. Welcome letter is arrived
It rains so hard that I fear the Weather is broke & then we
cannot go to Exeter -- but if we go I shall write from that place --
I sent a letter by the post Boy which I hope will arrive -- J.D[6]

                                                         Single
To[7]
Mrs. Dickenson
32 Devonshire Place
London[8]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Generous space left blank for place-name.
 2. Richard Cosway RA (1742-1821), leading English portrait painter of the Regency era. Born in Tiverton, Devon.
 3. Sir Henry Carew, 7th Baronet (1779-1830), possessor of Tiverton Castle. The Carew family owned the Castle from 1727 to 1922/23.
 4. Bampfylde Moore Carew (1690-1758), reputed to be the "King of the Gypsies".
 5. Cf. zatizfied, etc. (HAM/1/2/50) and further mockery of Mr Dayvy's preaching in HAM/1/2/51.
 6. Moved section here from right side of address panel in centre of p.3 when unfolded, written vertically.
 7. Postmarks 'E 7 SE 7 1813' to left of address when unfolded and '[BAM]PTON 18' to right.
 8. Moved address panel here from centre of p.3 when unfolded, written vertically.

Normalised Text




Saturday
Oakford 4 September 1813

Miss Perkin came home to dinner on Wednesday looking
very blooming & I was happy to see her in such good health
James was gone out with a Mr. Dayvy the Clergyman
of Bampton a person who was much esteemed by the
late Mr. Perkin -- he has obligingly lent me a good
old Pointer. Mr. Dayvy is a great Fisherman -- Mr. Dayvy went
home in the Evening when it rained very hard --
Thursday -- We went out a shooting -- a Mr. Bere
pronounced commonly Bear -- joined us with two indifferent
Dogs -- he is the young man for whom James
holds a Living -- We only found 4 Birds. I got a Shot
& missed -- The Corn is not ripe upon these hills & is
uncommonly late this Year -- So that Shooting here
is out of the question at present -- We had a hot walk
& rather tiresome -- After dinner I went down to the River
about a Mile & half from here & had very good sport in
fishing -- There is a beautiful River meandering there
a most enchanting Vale & the Sides of the hills covered to
their Summit with wood -- James laments grievously
that I was not here on Friday when there was a Stag Chase
& the Stag was found within a Mile of this place -- There



is a great many wild Deer in this immense chain of Woods
that are hunted at this Season & the Chase is commonly attended
by 100 or 150 Horsemen & the hills covered with Infantry
to see & hear the Sport for the Echo from the Concert of a large
pack of Hounds is very exhilarating -- I understand that
the Stag before he leaves Cover himself endeavours to drive
out the Ladies belonging to his Harem & selfishly tries to
secure his lordly majority -- at this Season the Hinds are
not hunted as they have young ones -- On monday I am
to partake of this Sport as the Hunt meet 7 miles off
very luckily as I wish to see a pecularity of this Country --
      Friday -- After breakfast James & I set out for Tiverton 9 miles
from home -- just as we were going Mr. Dayvy called & good humouredly
went with us & assisted James in pointing out the beautiful Skylarks
to me -- We rode through the Woods & in many places the Vistas
are like Enchantment -- Nothing can be be more beautiful. A
Road is now making along this Valley which will be
nearly flat all the way from here to Exeter & on the other
side up the vale to --                Two miles -- commanding
this beautiful Scenery -- the Hill from the river to this place
will be mended -- it is at present rather steep or so & the road
covered with leaf stems -- We went to Tiverton on one side of this
valley & returned on the other -- We saw the old Church at Tiverton
There is an Altarpiece by Cosway -- The Angel appearing to Peter, a
good picture -- The outside of the Church is ornamented with carved
work & a great many Ships with Coats of Arms -- Adjoining the
Church Yard is the remains of an old Castle & the family Seat of the
Carews & about a mile from the town I was shown the house where



Moore Carew joined the Gypsies -- The school at Tiverton is upon a large Establishment
There are 180 Boys all boarded in the House -- Whilst our Horses were feeding
we walked -- James & I to the Hays at Collinpriest ½ mile from the Town -- Mr
Hay & Lady Mary were out -- At Tiverton I had a specimen of Devonshire
Honesty -- I bought a pound of Gunpowder & tendered a two pound
Note -- The Shopkeeper who is to be the Mayor & a temporary dispenser
of Justice took out a handful of notes & in the middle picked out
one & gave it to me -- I observed it had seen service, as it was very
dirty & torn, but I thought it was selected for me as a Bank
of England Note in lieu of the Country Banks which pass here -- We went
to another Shop to buy a chip Hat & I gave the
Note the man said he had no change -- however
he went out to procure it & on his return
requested I would change the Note as it was a forged one -- So James & I
packed off to his approaching Worships & I desired him to change
the Note when he turned to a Boy in the shop & said -- "Did not I ask
you before where you got this Note" which shewed that he knew
he was passing a bad Note & was guilty of forgery in giving it to a
Stranger -- Just as we reached home Mr. Bere joined us and
dined with us -- After dinner James insisted on my going a fishing
as I had said I would Mrs. & Miss Perkin walked with me to the River
I only caught 3 as they were not in the humour to take the fly --
I have not had such a ride for some Years as this day -- it seems odd
for me to talk of a ride of 20 miles -- & I saw such a Dog Oh how Louisa
would have exclaimed what a beauty -- Moses is not to be compared to it --
At Tiverton there is a family of Dickinsons who are rich & Sir -- D---
      I found a defect in my Rod & paid a Man in Town /The greatest coxcombical
puppy I ever met with something like Magin Esquire/ too much money for
the repair of it & when I came to use it I found he had charged me for
doing Nothing to it -- Mr. Dayvy said he would send me two Rods for
my loss -- He is a good humoured man a good Edition of James Lord -- The very
worst preacher in England -- uses z for s on all occasions & what is very
singular he can read any book but the Scriptures very well -- Saturday



we had a great deal of Rain last Night -- Whilst we were at breakfast
the two rods came from Mr. Dayvy They are made on a better principle than
mine & have screws to fasten the joints -- I shall go a fishing by & by
but shall wait first till the old Lady comes from Bampton as I hope she
will bring me a letter from You -- The great exercise this week agrees with


me very well & I never was better in my life -- Mrs. Perkin has just shown
me a fine Collection of useful & ornamental China -- It is a very comfortable
House -- a good Drawing & Dining Room a large passage & large Servants Hall
another Sitting Room & a very pretty Garden -- It is now settled
that James & I set out on Tuesday next, I am Miss Perkin's pony, & go to Exeter
& from there to Exmouth -- Dawlish &c & see what we can see for 3 or 4 days
wind & weather permitting -- I must say every thing that is kind from
hence -- Mrs. Perkin seems very happy to have me here & it will do her good -- She
has suffered greatly in Mind & Body for the last 12 Months -- She has lost
one Eye & has a tumour settled in her face -- Mr. Perkin was a very handsome Man
here is an excellent picture of him by Opie & another extraordinary likeness of Mr. Perkin by
him & a fine picture of an old Beggar. Mr. Perkin gave Opie a Guinea for it & refused 100 --
Cosway was a Native of this place & means to be buried here --

James says he won't bury him if he does not present
the Church where he was christened with an Altarpiece
-- Adieu --                12 Your Welcome letter is arrived
It rains so hard that I fear the Weather is broke & then we
cannot go to Exeter -- but if we go I shall write from that place --
I sent a letter by the post Boy which I hope will arrive -- John Dickenson

                                                         Single
To
Mrs. Dickenson
32 Devonshire Place
London

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Generous space left blank for place-name.
 2. Richard Cosway RA (1742-1821), leading English portrait painter of the Regency era. Born in Tiverton, Devon.
 3. Sir Henry Carew, 7th Baronet (1779-1830), possessor of Tiverton Castle. The Carew family owned the Castle from 1727 to 1922/23.
 4. Bampfylde Moore Carew (1690-1758), reputed to be the "King of the Gypsies".
 5. Cf. zatizfied, etc. (HAM/1/2/50) and further mockery of Mr Dayvy's preaching in HAM/1/2/51.
 6. Moved section here from right side of address panel in centre of p.3 when unfolded, written vertically.
 7. Postmarks 'E 7 SE 7 1813' to left of address when unfolded and '[BAM]PTON 18' to right.
 8. Moved address panel here from centre of p.3 when unfolded, written vertically.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from John Dickenson to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/2/45

Correspondence Details

Author: John Dickenson

Place sent: Oakford

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: London

Date sent: 4 September 1813

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from John Dickenson to his wife Mary née Hamilton. He writes of his friends and acquaintances in Oakford and of hunting and shooting. He describes a stag chase and notes that the woods in the area are full of deer.
    Original reference No. 3.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 1376 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2014/15 and 2015/16 provided by the Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Isabella Formisano, former MA student, University of Manchester

Research assistant: Carla Seabra-Dacosta, MA student, University of Vigo

Transliterator: Aizhan Amangazina, MA student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2016)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 2 April 2020

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