Single Letter

HAM/1/2/56

Letter from John Dickenson to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text

[1]

      14

Thursday -- I went a fishing & sketching -- of the first I
caught only 4 -- Mr. Davy[2] had forestalled me & was in the River on
horseback -- of the latter I made 3 -- from ------Views contained in one
hundred yards distance from the road leading to Oakford bridge
Col. & Mrs. Teale & Mr. Langdon Junr. the Dr. alias Apoy of Bampton
came to dinner -- All the Neighbors in succession were invited
but all engaged -- Col. Teale has an estate about 2 Miles off &
a Cottage which he is improving -- he married a Lady of
Tiverton & genteelish Woman -- Col. Teale has lived in
the gay World & has much the Appearance of an Irishman
it is said he has been fond of Gambling -- he is a great friend
of Genl. Picton[3] who comes from the same Neighborhood
in Pembrokeshire or Herefordshire I have forgot which
As there was no Moon till late Mrs. P. preʃsed them to stay till it
rose -- so we had Cards & a Supper & they all set off at half
past eleven
Friday -- We set out after breakfast & the Christening of
2 Children -- I with the Pointer & James & his Grehounds
we met Col. Teale by appointment -- Two Hares were
found & one was killed -- The Pointer would not attend
me so when we were two miles from home I returned
but James was at home before me -- I came leisurely as
the day was intensely hot -- no Sun, but so close that it was
Calcutta[4] Heat -- I never perspired more -- I found Mr.
Sharpe Solr. of Manchester & his wife had just left
the door at my return -- he came in his profeʃsion to
give Mrs. P. Notice that a part of her miserable, old



Houses in Manr. will be wanted for a bridge for a new road that
is intended to be made to Bury -- I rejoiced at this as it will
be of great advantage to her in time & will increase the value
of her property considerably -- Mr. & Mrs. Fortescue
Brickdale came to pay their Wedding Visit -- They are
lately married -- She was a Miʃs Gregorie & has lived
much in Town & has the Airs of a fashonable Woman
They are a large Couple -- They prevented us setting
out as soon as we ought to Bampton where we were
to dine at Mr. Davys -- Miʃs P. walked as there was
no horse for her -- before we set out I had the pleasure
to receive yrs. of Wednesday -- We found ourselves half an
hour after the time for dinner -- but the dinner was not
spoilt -- The Trout were excellent & the Moorbad or Hepper[5]
nearly so -- they have no Teeth -- There were two others
to dine -- After dinner some Ladies to Tea & Cards --
Mr. D. showed me an Altarpiece of Cosways[6] that is
not yet put up -- I said it was rather presumptious
in me to offer to give an Opinion but as Miʃs P. had fixed
to go to Church on Sunday to Bampton I would then
take the liberty of aʃsisting in the decision -- The
party said they had nobody who understood any Thing
about it & shd. be obliged to me -- There was a Lady playing
very keenly at Casino -- it was observed there were several
old people in the Parish & particularly as a Mrs. Sidgood who
is 98 & who two Years ago took a ride on a double horse 11 miles
& back again one day -- She observed She was rather looking upwards



& is turned the round Corner of 80 herself -- Mr. D. mentioned that
there is an Apple Tree somewhere in the Country that has twice produced
9 Hogsheads of Cyder from the Apples of each year -- & generally pro
duces
5, 6 or 7 Hogs. This must require for 9 Hog. 250 pecks[7] of
Fruit -- We set out as soon as it became dusk leaving Miʃs P.
to stay all Night -- We met Mr. Badcock returng from his pastoral
Occupations -- he engaged us to dine wh- him on Wednesday -- I excused
myself saying that I shd. set out the beginning of the Week -- J. would
not hear of it & made the Engagement -- Mr. B. desired I would
try to find Birds on his Estate -- My old Dogs pace doesnt
much exceed my own Therefore it is too great a fag -- No
Matter -- I was extremely surprised
at what Miʃs E. T. with her long Bow took
Aim at respecting Mr. D--- -- One day when he
called on me -- the Conversation led to Religion & when he
left me I was persuaded he was a liberal minded Christian
& believed in the Doctrine without superstitious prejudices
& had what I call a natural Religion taken naturally
from the Scriptures -- He might choose to hocus[8] me but he
spoke seriously & left that impreʃsion on me -- I rejoice that
Louisa is made so much of -- I can suppose that Ly Cis.[9] may
doat on [her] -- She is a good judge of Human Nature & Manners
& more Excellence she never had under her Roof & Louisa has
a very entertaining as well as a peculiar manner of ingratiating
herself when alone -- I dare say Mrs. G with her profeʃsions
is at her Wits Ends & provoked that all her fine speechs
must be seen thro' -- it is better to hold our Tongue than
to be saying Things that really have no Meaning wh- English people
who are more downright than foreigners -- It gives me pleasure
that you approve of the Carriage -- I am always happy when you
are pleased -- I shall go a shooting or rather take a Walk
but write to you first -- When we came home last night we found[10]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. This letter is catalogued out of sequence. It belongs chronologically between HAM/1/2/50 and HAM/1/2/51.
 2. This surname is spelled Dayvy in all other letters from the Oakford visit where it occurs (HAM/1/2/45-HAM/1/2/54).
 3. Lieutenant-General Sir Thomas Picton (1758-1815), acquitted in London in 1806 of having a suspect tortured while Governor of Trinidad.
 4. Kolkata (formerly Calcutta) is the capital city of the Indian state of West Bengal.
 5. Local name of young salmon.
 6. Richard Cosway RA (1742-1821), leading English portrait painter of the Regency era. Born in Tiverton, Devon.
 7. Peck, a unit of capacity for dry goods or liquid measure equal to two gallons.
 8. Perhaps hocus v. 'To play a trick upon, "take in", hoax' (OED).
 9. Lady Cecilia Johnston (1730-1817), née Henrietta Cecilia West, mentioned also in HAM/1/2/48,53,57, writer of HAM/1/14/110.
 10. The last page remains to be added to image and transcription.

Normalised Text



Thursday -- I went a fishing & sketching -- of the first I
caught only 4 -- Mr. Davy had forestalled me & was in the River on
horseback -- of the latter I made 3 -- from Views contained in one
hundred yards distance from the road leading to Oakford bridge
Colonel & Mrs. Teale & Mr. Langdon Junior the Doctor alias Apothecary of Bampton
came to dinner -- All the Neighbours in succession were invited
but all engaged -- Colonel Teale has an estate about 2 Miles off &
a Cottage which he is improving -- he married a Lady of
Tiverton & genteelish Woman -- Colonel Teale has lived in
the gay World & has much the Appearance of an Irishman
it is said he has been fond of Gambling -- he is a great friend
of General Picton who comes from the same Neighbourhood
in Pembrokeshire or Herefordshire I have forgotten which
As there was no Moon till late Mrs. Perkin pressed them to stay till it
rose -- so we had Cards & a Supper & they all set off at half
past eleven
Friday -- We set out after breakfast & the Christening of
2 Children -- I with the Pointer & James & his Greyhounds
we met Colonel Teale by appointment -- Two Hares were
found & one was killed -- The Pointer would not attend
me so when we were two miles from home I returned
but James was at home before me -- I came leisurely as
the day was intensely hot -- no Sun, but so close that it was
Calcutta Heat -- I never perspired more -- I found Mr.
Sharpe Solicitor of Manchester & his wife had just left
the door at my return -- he came in his profession to
give Mrs. Perkin Notice that a part of her miserable, old



Houses in Manchester will be wanted for a bridge for a new road that
is intended to be made to Bury -- I rejoiced at this as it will
be of great advantage to her in time & will increase the value
of her property considerably -- Mr. & Mrs. Fortescue
Brickdale came to pay their Wedding Visit -- They are
lately married -- She was a Miss Gregorie & has lived
much in Town & has the Airs of a fashionable Woman
They are a large Couple -- They prevented us setting
out as soon as we ought to Bampton where we were
to dine at Mr. Davys -- Miss Perkin walked as there was
no horse for her -- before we set out I had the pleasure
to receive yours of Wednesday -- We found ourselves half an
hour after the time for dinner -- but the dinner was not
spoilt -- The Trout were excellent & the Moorbad or Hepper
nearly so -- they have no Teeth -- There were two others
to dine -- After dinner some Ladies to Tea & Cards --
Mr. Davy showed me an Altarpiece of Cosways that is
not yet put up -- I said it was rather presumptuous
in me to offer to give an Opinion but as Miss Perkin had fixed
to go to Church on Sunday to Bampton I would then
take the liberty of assisting in the decision -- The
party said they had nobody who understood any Thing
about it & should be obliged to me -- There was a Lady playing
very keenly at Casino -- it was observed there were several
old people in the Parish & particularly as a Mrs. Sidgood who
is 98 & who two Years ago took a ride on a double horse 11 miles
& back again one day -- She observed She was rather looking upwards



& is turned the round Corner of 80 herself -- Mr. Davy mentioned that
there is an Apple Tree somewhere in the Country that has twice produced
9 Hogsheads of Cyder from the Apples of each year -- & generally produces
5, 6 or 7 Hogsheads This must require for 9 Hogsheads 250 pecks of
Fruit -- We set out as soon as it became dusk leaving Miss Perkin
to stay all Night -- We met Mr. Badcock returning from his pastoral
Occupations -- he engaged us to dine with him on Wednesday -- I excused
myself saying that I should set out the beginning of the Week -- James would
not hear of it & made the Engagement -- Mr. Badcock desired I would
try to find Birds on his Estate -- My old Dogs pace doesnt
much exceed my own Therefore it is too great a fag -- No
Matter -- I was extremely surprised
at what Miss E. Teale with her long Bow took
Aim at respecting Mr. D--- -- One day when he
called on me -- the Conversation led to Religion & when he
left me I was persuaded he was a liberal minded Christian
& believed in the Doctrine without superstitious prejudices
& had what I call a natural Religion taken naturally
from the Scriptures -- He might choose to hocus me but he
spoke seriously & left that impression on me -- I rejoice that
Louisa is made so much of -- I can suppose that Lady Cis. may
dote on her -- She is a good judge of Human Nature & Manners
& more Excellence she never had under her Roof & Louisa has
a very entertaining as well as a peculiar manner of ingratiating
herself when alone -- I dare say Mrs. G with her professions
is at her Wits Ends & provoked that all her fine speeches
must be seen through -- it is better to hold our Tongue than
to be saying Things that really have no Meaning with English people
who are more downright than foreigners -- It gives me pleasure
that you approve of the Carriage -- I am always happy when you
are pleased -- I shall go a shooting or rather take a Walk
but write to you first -- When we came home last night we found

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 1. This letter is catalogued out of sequence. It belongs chronologically between HAM/1/2/50 and HAM/1/2/51.
 2. This surname is spelled Dayvy in all other letters from the Oakford visit where it occurs (HAM/1/2/45-HAM/1/2/54).
 3. Lieutenant-General Sir Thomas Picton (1758-1815), acquitted in London in 1806 of having a suspect tortured while Governor of Trinidad.
 4. Kolkata (formerly Calcutta) is the capital city of the Indian state of West Bengal.
 5. Local name of young salmon.
 6. Richard Cosway RA (1742-1821), leading English portrait painter of the Regency era. Born in Tiverton, Devon.
 7. Peck, a unit of capacity for dry goods or liquid measure equal to two gallons.
 8. Perhaps hocus v. 'To play a trick upon, "take in", hoax' (OED).
 9. Lady Cecilia Johnston (1730-1817), née Henrietta Cecilia West, mentioned also in HAM/1/2/48,53,57, writer of HAM/1/14/110.
 10. The last page remains to be added to image and transcription.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from John Dickenson to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/2/56

Correspondence Details

Author: John Dickenson

Place sent: Oakford (certainty: high)

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: London

Date sent: 16 September 1813
when 16 September 1813 (precision: medium)

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from John Dickenson to his wife Mary née Hamilton. The letter describes Dickenson’s visit to Oakford, and his activities sketching, fishing and coursing. Dickenson also provides general news of his friends there.
    Original reference No. 14.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 963 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2014/15 and 2015/16 provided by the Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Isabella Formisano, former MA student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Almira Sejfic, MA student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2016)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 15 June 2020

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