Single Letter

HAM/1/2/9

Letter from John Dickenson to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


      Loughboro' Sunday Evg 19 -- March 1786

Now my dearest Wife I begin another journal -- but
this will be dull & uninteresting -- as I shall have little
else than mere Matter of fact to write about, and but
a small variation of that -- You my Love have a
warm interest in every thing that concerns your
Husband, and therefore trifles will not be unaccep-
table
to you -- Your excellent heart will inform
you much better than I can, how much concern I
feel at any Separation from the woman I so
sincerely love & esteem -- but I hope yr D- will
------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------




he is going to London to see Mrs. Racket his Wife who has got
a Feveret[1] -- poor dear Mrs. Delany how I pity her --
She will be sadly tormented by that Madcap -- Dr-
Heberden[2] has been call'd in, so I suppose the Complaint
was rather more than a Vagaryie -- I sent a Meʃsage
to Mrs. Delany I jogged on thro dirty roads and over hard
pavements to this place, where I hope to sleep, but
I am forty nine Miles from my dear Mary -- Oh how
I miʃs your charming Saucineʃses -- dont you
sometimes wish for me at yr- Elbow -- I shd. be very
happy to be there -- Adieu ma tres tres chere femme
------------ aime [3]avec tout mon cœur -- bon soir mon Amour

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. 'A slight fever' (OED s.v. feveret n.).
 2. William Heberden (1710-1801), one of the most distinguished physicians of the period (ODNB).
 3. Probably Je vous aime ....

Normalised Text


      Loughborough Sunday Evening 19 -- March 1786

Now my dearest Wife I begin another journal -- but
this will be dull & uninteresting -- as I shall have little
else than mere Matter of fact to write about, and but
a small variation of that -- You my Love have a
warm interest in every thing that concerns your
Husband, and therefore trifles will not be unacceptable
to you -- Your excellent heart will inform
you much better than I can, how much concern I
feel at any Separation from the woman I so
sincerely love & esteem -- but I hope your Dickenson will
------------------------------------------------------------



he is going to London to see Mrs. Racket his Wife who has got
a Feveret -- poor dear Mrs. Delany how I pity her --
She will be sadly tormented by that Madcap -- Dr-
Heberden has been call'd in, so I suppose the Complaint
was rather more than a Vagarie -- I sent a Message
to Mrs. Delany I jogged on through dirty roads and over hard
pavements to this place, where I hope to sleep, but
I am forty nine Miles from my dear Mary -- Oh how
I miss your charming Saucinesses -- dont you
sometimes wish for me at your Elbow -- I should be very
happy to be there -- Adieu ma tres tres chere femme
------------ aime avec tout mon cœur -- bon soir mon Amour

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. 'A slight fever' (OED s.v. feveret n.).
 2. William Heberden (1710-1801), one of the most distinguished physicians of the period (ODNB).
 3. Probably Je vous aime ....

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from John Dickenson to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/2/9

Correspondence Details

Author: John Dickenson

Place sent: Loughborough

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 19 March 1786

Letter Description

Summary: Note from John Dickenson to his wife Mary née Hamilton. He notes that he is to begin another journal and although it will be 'dull and uninteresting' he knows that Hamilton has an interest in all that concerns him.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 222 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2016/17 provided by The John Rylands Research Institute.

Research assistant: Sarah Connor, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Charlotte Campbell, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2017)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 2 April 2020

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