Single Letter

HAM/1/4/1/12

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


Jan 31, 1780

Dear Miʃs Hamilton,
     
From your very kind and affectionate attention to
me upon every occasion during my stay in London, I
am certain it will give you pleasure to hear that I am
arrived safe in Dublin without having suffer'd from the
very severe weather on my journey and a rough paʃsage;
I arrived here early on Saturday morning, and within an
an hour or two of the time that I was expected; as you are
a person of no small sensibility, you can judge of the satis=
faction
I felt in being returned to my family after so long
an absence. I am certain you discover'd an impatience
which ought to have been conceal'd, for it was certainly
a strange return for your aʃsiduous attention to me,
which was indeed very different from what I experienced



from every other quarter. Tho' I can not flatter myself with
the idea that the object of my visit to England has been
answer'd as I cou'd have wish'd, yet I aʃsure you I have receiv'd
ample compensation for all the trouble it has given me.
There was no posʃibility of convincing my Friends here that
with such ostensible family connections it cou'd require any
thing more than my appearance amongst them to unite them
in my service. It was impoʃsible to explain difficulties to them,
it was easier for me to make an attempt from which I had no
great hopes of succeʃs, than to suffer the constant reproach
of indolence & of being of an helpleʃs disposition. You know my
situation precisely, it is therefore unneceʃsary to tire you
with any further detail or explanation.
      This Country is disposed to be perfectly satisfied with what
has been done for them, but there are clandestine attempts
by Persons in England to create new difficulties in which
it is generally supposed they will be disappointed. When
you do me the favour of writing pray remember to enclose



a frank or two for my letters are not worth the postage.
Mrs. Hamilton & Mrs. Stratford desire to be affectionately remem=
berd
to you I am Dear Miʃs Hamilton
                                                         Your faithful & Affectionate Uncle
Frederick Hamilton

Sackville Street, Dublin[1]
      Jany. 31st 1780

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Notes


 1. Address appears to left of signature.

Normalised Text



Dear Miss Hamilton,
     
From your very kind and affectionate attention to
me upon every occasion during my stay in London, I
am certain it will give you pleasure to hear that I am
arrived safe in Dublin without having suffer'd from the
very severe weather on my journey and a rough passage;
I arrived here early on Saturday morning, and within an
hour or two of the time that I was expected; as you are
a person of no small sensibility, you can judge of the satisfaction
I felt in being returned to my family after so long
an absence. I am certain you discover'd an impatience
which ought to have been conceal'd, for it was certainly
a strange return for your assiduous attention to me,
which was indeed very different from what I experienced



from every other quarter. though I can not flatter myself with
the idea that the object of my visit to England has been
answer'd as I could have wish'd, yet I assure you I have receiv'd
ample compensation for all the trouble it has given me.
There was no possibility of convincing my Friends here that
with such ostensible family connections it could require any
thing more than my appearance amongst them to unite them
in my service. It was impossible to explain difficulties to them,
it was easier for me to make an attempt from which I had no
great hopes of success, than to suffer the constant reproach
of indolence & of being of an helpless disposition. You know my
situation precisely, it is therefore unnecessary to tire you
with any further detail or explanation.
      This Country is disposed to be perfectly satisfied with what
has been done for them, but there are clandestine attempts
by Persons in England to create new difficulties in which
it is generally supposed they will be disappointed. When
you do me the favour of writing pray remember to enclose



a frank or two for my letters are not worth the postage.
Mrs. Hamilton & Mrs. Stratford desire to be affectionately rememberd
to you I am Dear Miss Hamilton
                                                         Your faithful & Affectionate Uncle
Frederick Hamilton

Sackville Street, Dublin
      January 31st 1780

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 1. Address appears to left of signature.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/1/12

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: Dublin

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 31 January 1780

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to Mary Hamilton. He informs his niece of his safe arrival in Dublin and thanks her for her attentions to him during his visit to London, which was so 'very different from what I experienced from every other quarter'. He writes that the 'object' of his visit [presumably preferment in the Church] has not been answered as he would have wished. The letter also notes that Ireland seems satisfied with what has been done for it but that there are people in England working surreptitiously to create difficulties. 'This Country is disposed to be perfectly satisfied with what has been done for them, but there are clandestine attempts by Persons in England to create new difficulties in which it is generally supposed they will be disappointed.'
   

Length: 1 sheet, 364 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Chun Quing, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Ciara Cusack, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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