Single Letter

HAM/1/4/1/28

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


April /86

My Dear Mrs. Dickenson

      I beg you will accept my best thanks for your
very obliging letter, which Mr. Greville brought me a
few days ago enclosing the long & very satisfactory de=
tail
of the Academy at Brunswick, which I shall
carefully lay by in case it shou'd be an eligible plan
some time hence to finish Robert's education there;
at present tho' there might be no objection as to his
age, yet he is too little advanced in knowledge
to receive benefit there; but I have the satisfaction
to acquaint you that he is really improving very
much, & Mr. Chauvet has aʃsured me that he is now
satisfied with him. I am very glad to hear that
Mr. Dickenson return'd to you in good health, we
had much leʃs of his company than we cou'd have
wish'd, & I am sure he is very obliging to represent
the small attention it was in our power to shew
him in so favorable a light. We all think extremely



well of him, as he deserves. In spight of the Amuse=
ments
of this Town I aʃsure you, his impatience to re=
turn
to your society was visible. I am glad to
have it in my power to inform you that I shall be
ready to pay £1025 being the Principal & Interest due
upon your Heretable Bond on the 13th. of May next. As
this Bond will be Personal Property which I may con=
vey
by Will to whom I please, it will be neceʃsary that
Mr. Dickenson shou'd make a Conveyance of it to me in
the name of some Person as my Trustee, to guard against
the objection of my appearing both Debitor & Creditor at
the same time. I will write immediately to my Agent in
Scotland for the proper Instrument & instructions, leaving
a Blank for my Trustee whom I have not yet fixed upon;
but at all events the money shall be paid upon the day
above mention'd, upon my getting a proper discharge
from Mr. Dickenson. The Heretable Bond shou'd be sent
to me without loʃs of time for I apprehend it may be ne=
ceʃsary
to send it to Scotland. The money is at this time
in Mr. Hammersley's hands & shall be paid in the manner
that will be most convenient to Mr. Dickenson without



putting him to the trouble of a journey to receive it.
      We have all been in a most terrible alarm, which thank
God is now over; poor Ld. Brooke has been in the utmost
danger at Winchester from a putrid fever & sore throat
Lady Caroline & James Peachy have been there several
days & I believe are not yet return'd to London. Ld.
Warwick was also with him; I saw his letter to my
Sister which was very satisfactory; he was so well that
he was to leave him the next day.     We have no plan of
any excursion for this summer & I rather think that
I shall stay in Town the whole of it, saving my money,
& attending to my Daughters education who is still
in the hands of many Masters. I think she is improving &
have the satisfaction of being told so by others who may
be better judges. Mrs. Hamilton & your cousin desire to be
affectionately remember'd to you & Mr. Dickenson to whom
I beg you will present my best Compts. believing me ever
                             Dear Mrs. Dickenson
                             Your faithful & Affectionate
                                                         Humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

Bedford Square
      April 13th. 1786.



Honble. Fedk. Hamilton
April 13 -- 1786
[1]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. The abbreviation is written Fedk, without r.

Normalised Text



My Dear Mrs. Dickenson

      I beg you will accept my best thanks for your
very obliging letter, which Mr. Greville brought me a
few days ago enclosing the long & very satisfactory detail
of the Academy at Brunswick, which I shall
carefully lay by in case it should be an eligible plan
some time hence to finish Robert's education there;
at present though there might be no objection as to his
age, yet he is too little advanced in knowledge
to receive benefit there; but I have the satisfaction
to acquaint you that he is really improving very
much, & Mr. Chauvet has assured me that he is now
satisfied with him. I am very glad to hear that
Mr. Dickenson return'd to you in good health, we
had much less of his company than we could have
wish'd, & I am sure he is very obliging to represent
the small attention it was in our power to shew
him in so favorable a light. We all think extremely



well of him, as he deserves. In spite of the Amusements
of this Town I assure you, his impatience to return
to your society was visible. I am glad to
have it in my power to inform you that I shall be
ready to pay £1025 being the Principal & Interest due
upon your Heritable Bond on the 13th. of May next. As
this Bond will be Personal Property which I may convey
by Will to whom I please, it will be necessary that
Mr. Dickenson should make a Conveyance of it to me in
the name of some Person as my Trustee, to guard against
the objection of my appearing both Debitor & Creditor at
the same time. I will write immediately to my Agent in
Scotland for the proper Instrument & instructions, leaving
a Blank for my Trustee whom I have not yet fixed upon;
but at all events the money shall be paid upon the day
above mention'd, upon my getting a proper discharge
from Mr. Dickenson. The Heritable Bond should be sent
to me without loss of time for I apprehend it may be necessary
to send it to Scotland. The money is at this time
in Mr. Hammersley's hands & shall be paid in the manner
that will be most convenient to Mr. Dickenson without



putting him to the trouble of a journey to receive it.
      We have all been in a most terrible alarm, which thank
God is now over; poor Lord Brooke has been in the utmost
danger at Winchester from a putrid fever & sore throat
Lady Caroline & James Peachy have been there several
days & I believe are not yet return'd to London. Lord
Warwick was also with him; I saw his letter to my
Sister which was very satisfactory; he was so well that
he was to leave him the next day.     We have no plan of
any excursion for this summer & I rather think that
I shall stay in Town the whole of it, saving my money,
& attending to my Daughters education who is still
in the hands of many Masters. I think she is improving &
have the satisfaction of being told so by others who may
be better judges. Mrs. Hamilton & your cousin desire to be
affectionately remember'd to you & Mr. Dickenson to whom
I beg you will present my best Compliments believing me ever
                             Dear Mrs. Dickenson
                             Your faithful & Affectionate
                                                         Humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

Bedford Square
      April 13th. 1786.



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 1. The abbreviation is written Fedk, without r.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/1/28

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: London

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 13 April 1786

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to Mary Hamilton [now Mrs Dickenson]. He writes of her husband's visit to London. He also informs her that £1025 of her heritable bond, the principal capital and interest due, is ready to be paid. On the 13th May the bond will be personal property, which Frederick Hamilton can convey by will to whoever he pleases. He advises Mr Dickenson to make a conveyance of it to him in the name of another person 'as my Trustee to guard against the objection of my appearing both Debitor & Creditor at the same time'. He will write to his agent in Scotland 'for the proper Instrument'. The letter continues with news on family and friends including the education of his daughter, Jane.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 587 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Research assistant: Carla Seabra-Dacosta, MA student, University of Vigo

Transliterator: Rita Vivas-Garcia, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Emily Hodson, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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