Single Letter

HAM/1/4/1/4

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


1777

Dear Miʃs. Hamilton,

      It gives me the greatest pleasure to hear from yourself
that you are so well satisfied with your new situation;
I make no doubt that you will continue to merit every atten=
tion
that is shewn you, by your prudent conduct. I am much
obliged to you for the deference you are pleased to expreʃs for any
advice coming from me, which I shall think hereafter unne=
ceʃsary
to offer us I now look upon you as perfectly established
in the right track, to which I hope nothing is wanting but
perseverance to conduct you to such a situation as you cou'd
wish.
      As I now look upon myself as settled in Ireland for the
remaining period of my life, I am laying out a considerable
sum of money for me, upon a small Estate that I purchased
some time ago about three miles from Dublin, the situation
is remarkably beautiful, and I have nearly completed the



House, which from a very bad one will with the additions that
I have made to it be sufficient to accommodate me tolerably. I
have but very small expectations of advancement in my Profeʃsion
not having Friends zealous enough to aʃsist me. I have continued
One, and Twenty years upon the same Living, situated in a part
of the World that I can never be reconcil'd to, in a most remote
northern Part of Ireland in the midst of a Colony of Presbiterian
Independants, but I must not permit myself to proceed into
any further detail of my own situation in which there is
nothing interesting or satisfactory.     As you did not mention
your Mother, I conclude she is well, I am sure I most sincerely
congratulate her in the happineʃs she must enjoy in seeing you
in so respectable a situation, cou'd I be of any service to her
she may be aʃsured of my best inclinations and that there is no
remembrance remaining of past disagreeable circumstances.
      I can not expect to entertain you with news from this place
as every thing interesting comes to us from your side; this is
Parliament winter here, & the busineʃs is now begun and
the Patriots prepared as usual to harangue for the good



of the Country & their own emolument. Mrs. Hamilton and Mrs.
Stratford desire to be affectionately remember'd to you, I expect
during the course of the next month to be favour'd with a
title that will remind me that I must here after rank myself
in the Claʃs of Veterans Adieu. Dear Miʃs Hamilton believe me
ever
                                                         Yours Most faithfully & Affectionly
Frederick Hamilton

Gloucester Street
      November 3d 1777

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Normalised Text



Dear Miss. Hamilton,

      It gives me the greatest pleasure to hear from yourself
that you are so well satisfied with your new situation;
I make no doubt that you will continue to merit every attention
that is shewn you, by your prudent conduct. I am much
obliged to you for the deference you are pleased to express for any
advice coming from me, which I shall think hereafter unnecessary
to offer us I now look upon you as perfectly established
in the right track, to which I hope nothing is wanting but
perseverance to conduct you to such a situation as you could
wish.
      As I now look upon myself as settled in Ireland for the
remaining period of my life, I am laying out a considerable
sum of money for me, upon a small Estate that I purchased
some time ago about three miles from Dublin, the situation
is remarkably beautiful, and I have nearly completed the



House, which from a very bad one will with the additions that
I have made to it be sufficient to accommodate me tolerably. I
have but very small expectations of advancement in my Profession
not having Friends zealous enough to assist me. I have continued
One, and Twenty years upon the same Living, situated in a part
of the World that I can never be reconcil'd to, in a most remote
northern Part of Ireland in the midst of a Colony of Presbyterian
Independents, but I must not permit myself to proceed into
any further detail of my own situation in which there is
nothing interesting or satisfactory.     As you did not mention
your Mother, I conclude she is well, I am sure I most sincerely
congratulate her in the happiness she must enjoy in seeing you
in so respectable a situation, could I be of any service to her
she may be assured of my best inclinations and that there is no
remembrance remaining of past disagreeable circumstances.
      I can not expect to entertain you with news from this place
as every thing interesting comes to us from your side; this is
Parliament winter here, & the business is now begun and
the Patriots prepared as usual to harangue for the good



of the Country & their own emolument. Mrs. Hamilton and Mrs.
Stratford desire to be affectionately remember'd to you, I expect
during the course of the next month to be favour'd with a
title that will remind me that I must here after rank myself
in the Class of Veterans Adieu. Dear Miss Hamilton believe me
ever
                                                         Yours Most faithfully & Affectionately
Frederick Hamilton

Gloucester Street
      November 3d 1777

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Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/1/4

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: Dublin

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 3 November 1777

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to Mary Hamilton relating to his setting up residence in Ireland and purchasing a small estate approximately three miles outside Dublin. He also refers to his profession and the fact that he has had the same living in an area of Ireland that he cannot be 'reconciled' to and 'in the midst of a Colony of Presbiterian Independants' [sic].
   

Length: 1 sheet, 439 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Harriet Fitzgerald-Allsopp, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Limeng Tang, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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