Single Letter

HAM/1/4/1/6

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


Aug 1778

Dear Miʃs Hamilton

      Your letter of the 3d. of this Inst. which I receiv'd yesterday
has reliev'd me from much anxiety on your account; what you
say of your present state of health, and of the attention
that you experience is highly satisfactory to your Friends, as
they must esteem it as the best testimony, that your conduct
is approved of. I have been settled at my House within
3 miles of Dublin since the 20th. of May last & find it in every
respect a most agreeable & convenient residence, the situation
cannot be excell'd as it commands the view of the Bay of Dublin
with the opposite Hills cover'd with Villas. I have a little
farm of about fifty English Acres, the half of which is in a Lawn
in front of my House, pastur'd by sheep & other cattle, which
enliven the scene & are very useful in other respects. With
regard to the small Parish in my neighbourhood which wou'd
be so eligible an acquisition to me, by justifying my absen=
ting
myself from my Living in the North of Ireland, of all



places in the world the most detestable, I do not see that I have
at present any chance of attaining it, so that I am not without
my apprehensions of being at last reduced to the neceʃsity of
giving up that Living, if my residence there shou'd be insisted
upon; this wou'd be a very distreʃsing reduction of my in=
come
, but still of two evils the least.
      I am truly concern'd to hear that Ld. Dartrey has met with
so great an affliction, this is I believe the second within these few
years, for if I remember right he loʃs'd a son by a fall from a
horse.
      Mr. Brown has transmitted me the Papers you mention
and I have returned them signed. Tho' Mrs. Hamilton must
enjoy great satisfaction in the thoughts of your present con=
nections
, yet she must feel the loʃs of the comfort of your so=
ciety
very severely, especially as she does not enjoy a good state
of health. I beg you will do me the favor when you write
to present my Compts. to her. Poor Mrs. Stratford has disposed
of herself very unfortunately to a man of fortune indeed, but
so wretched a being that it is impossible for me [to] keep up
any intercourse with him, so that we do not see her as often



as we cou'd wish, she has a daughter about eight months
old and is in the way of adding to his family a second time.
My second Daughter is a very agreeable Child now ten years
old & will I hope be more fortunate than her Sister. My Son is with
us and is at last recover'd from the bad consequences of the
inoculation & will be a very well looking boy.     When I
was mentioning some particulars of this place I forgot to in=
form
you that we mean to make it our constant residence
for some time at least, and to paʃs the next winter here. I
have been at so great an expence in the purchase, additions
furnishing &c. that this is a matter more of prudence than of
choice Mrs. Hamilton desires to join with me in Compts. &
every good wish I am
                             Dear Miʃs. Hamilton
                                                         Your Affectionate Uncle
Frederick Hamilton

August 11th. 1778[1]

Latour -- Clontarf
      near Dublin

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Notes


 1. Date appears to left of closing salutation and signature.

Normalised Text



Dear Miss Hamilton

      Your letter of the 3d. of this Instant which I receiv'd yesterday
has reliev'd me from much anxiety on your account; what you
say of your present state of health, and of the attention
that you experience is highly satisfactory to your Friends, as
they must esteem it as the best testimony, that your conduct
is approved of. I have been settled at my House within
3 miles of Dublin since the 20th. of May last & find it in every
respect a most agreeable & convenient residence, the situation
cannot be excell'd as it commands the view of the Bay of Dublin
with the opposite Hills cover'd with Villas. I have a little
farm of about fifty English Acres, the half of which is in a Lawn
in front of my House, pastur'd by sheep & other cattle, which
enliven the scene & are very useful in other respects. With
regard to the small Parish in my neighbourhood which would
be so eligible an acquisition to me, by justifying my absenting
myself from my Living in the North of Ireland, of all



places in the world the most detestable, I do not see that I have
at present any chance of attaining it, so that I am not without
my apprehensions of being at last reduced to the necessity of
giving up that Living, if my residence there should be insisted
upon; this would be a very distressing reduction of my income
, but still of two evils the least.
      I am truly concern'd to hear that Lord Dartrey has met with
so great an affliction, this is I believe the second within these few
years, for if I remember right he lost a son by a fall from a
horse.
      Mr. Brown has transmitted me the Papers you mention
and I have returned them signed. though Mrs. Hamilton must
enjoy great satisfaction in the thoughts of your present connections
, yet she must feel the loss of the comfort of your society
very severely, especially as she does not enjoy a good state
of health. I beg you will do me the favor when you write
to present my Compliments to her. Poor Mrs. Stratford has disposed
of herself very unfortunately to a man of fortune indeed, but
so wretched a being that it is impossible for me to keep up
any intercourse with him, so that we do not see her as often



as we could wish, she has a daughter about eight months
old and is in the way of adding to his family a second time.
My second Daughter is a very agreeable Child now ten years
old & will I hope be more fortunate than her Sister. My Son is with
us and is at last recover'd from the bad consequences of the
inoculation & will be a very well looking boy.     When I
was mentioning some particulars of this place I forgot to inform
you that we mean to make it our constant residence
for some time at least, and to pass the next winter here. I
have been at so great an expense in the purchase, additions
furnishing &c. that this is a matter more of prudence than of
choice Mrs. Hamilton desires to join with me in Compliments &
every good wish I am
                             Dear Miss. Hamilton
                                                         Your Affectionate Uncle
Frederick Hamilton

August 11th. 1778

Latour -- Clontarf
      near Dublin

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 1. Date appears to left of closing salutation and signature.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/1/6

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: Clontarf, near Dublin

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: London (certainty: low)

Date sent: 11 August 1778

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to Mary Hamilton relating to his estate in Dublin. The letter describes a small parish in his neighbourhood which he would be pleased to acquire, as it would justify his absences from his living in the north of Ireland, though he does not believe this would be possible.
    The remainder of the letter is concerned with news of family and friends. He explains that his daughter Elizabeth, despite marrying a man of fortune, has an unhappy marriage (see HAM/1/4/1/2) and he hopes his second daughter, then aged ten, will be more fortunate. He reports that his son is with him in Ireland and is recovering from a bad reaction to his inoculation [probably for smallpox].
   

Length: 1 sheet, 568 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Iago Valin-Lopez, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Rachel Harrison, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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