Single Letter

HAM/1/4/1/7

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


Dec 1778

Dear Miʃs Hamilton

      Your very obliging letter of the 19th. of this Inst. is now
before me and as you have desired my opinion upon
a step that you think advisable to take with regard
to drawing Two Hundred Pounds from the 3 pr.Ct. stock for
the uses you mention, I take this first opportunity of
aʃsuring you that I perfectly agree with you upon the
propriety of it, and moreover think that this diminu=
tion
of your little capital will be of no consequence,
& tho' Mrs. Hamilton requires no further proofs of your
tenderdeʃs & affection for her yet you will undoubtedly
feel a secret satisfaction in the reflection of having
doubled your attentions at this critical time. I have
no opinion of German Doctors, their prescriptions are
commonly too rough. I have often heard of Dr. Burton
and think you cannot consult a better Person.
      Mr. Fetherston call'd here a few days ago & seem'd



much pleased that he had been able to remit the remain=
der
of Mrs Hamilton's half years Rent, which I hope will
be come to hand before the receipt of this. The distreʃses of
this Country are so uncommonly great, that I really know
not what we are to expect, it is impossible that Rents shou'd
be paid as formerly, there being little money left in the
Country & no trade to bring a return of it.
I cannot say that I am much flatter'd by his M-y's re=
collection
of me attended with trivial enquiries, having
receiv'd receiv'd repeated promises of a more substantial
remembrance, which has been deferr'd so long that it wou'd
be folley to ground any hopes upon it. When arrived to the
age of fifty, it is time to be discouraged from the pursuit
of favors that I had good reason to expect for these twenty years
past. It is matter of real consolation to me to be able to aʃsert
with confidence that tho' I have fail'd in my expectations of
royal favor so often promised, my conduct has ever been such
as wou'd not discredit a man of honor. From the number of
low & mean Persons in general that fill the bench of Bishops in
this Country it wou'd seem that our Governors thought the



interests of Religion safer in the hands of Schoolmasters and
Tutors than in those men of birth & property, but I am
sensible this is a digreʃsion I shou'd have avoided, however
it shall introduce a piece of advice to you, that you shou'd
remain with a firm & constant persuasion that r-l favor
is hardly earned, and too frequently blown away by the slightest
blast.
      I beg you will accept of our best wishes & remember us
affectionately to Mrs. Hamilton of whom we hope soon to receive
better accounts, I am
                             Dear Miʃs Hamilton
                             Your faithful & Affectionate Uncle
Frederick Hamilton

December 1st 1778
Latour, Clontarf
      near Dublin[1]

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Notes


 1. These three lines appear to left of closing salutation and signature.

Normalised Text



Dear Miss Hamilton

      Your very obliging letter of the 19th. of this Instant is now
before me and as you have desired my opinion upon
a step that you think advisable to take with regard
to drawing Two Hundred Pounds from the 3 percent stock for
the uses you mention, I take this first opportunity of
assuring you that I perfectly agree with you upon the
propriety of it, and moreover think that this diminution
of your little capital will be of no consequence,
& though Mrs. Hamilton requires no further proofs of your
tenderness & affection for her yet you will undoubtedly
feel a secret satisfaction in the reflection of having
doubled your attentions at this critical time. I have
no opinion of German Doctors, their prescriptions are
commonly too rough. I have often heard of Dr. Burton
and think you cannot consult a better Person.
      Mr. Fetherston call'd here a few days ago & seem'd



much pleased that he had been able to remit the remainder
of Mrs Hamilton's half years Rent, which I hope will
be come to hand before the receipt of this. The distresses of
this Country are so uncommonly great, that I really know
not what we are to expect, it is impossible that Rents should
be paid as formerly, there being little money left in the
Country & no trade to bring a return of it.
I cannot say that I am much flatter'd by his Majesty's recollection
of me attended with trivial enquiries, having
receiv'd repeated promises of a more substantial
remembrance, which has been deferr'd so long that it would
be folly to ground any hopes upon it. When arrived to the
age of fifty, it is time to be discouraged from the pursuit
of favors that I had good reason to expect for these twenty years
past. It is matter of real consolation to me to be able to assert
with confidence that though I have fail'd in my expectations of
royal favor so often promised, my conduct has ever been such
as would not discredit a man of honor. From the number of
low & mean Persons in general that fill the bench of Bishops in
this Country it would seem that our Governors thought the



interests of Religion safer in the hands of Schoolmasters and
Tutors than in those men of birth & property, but I am
sensible this is a digression I should have avoided, however
it shall introduce a piece of advice to you, that you should
remain with a firm & constant persuasion that royal favor
is hardly earned, and too frequently blown away by the slightest
blast.
      I beg you will accept of our best wishes & remember us
affectionately to Mrs. Hamilton of whom we hope soon to receive
better accounts, I am
                             Dear Miss Hamilton
                             Your faithful & Affectionate Uncle
Frederick Hamilton

December 1st 1778
Latour, Clontarf
      near Dublin

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 1. These three lines appear to left of closing salutation and signature.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/1/7

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: Clontarf, near Dublin

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: London (certainty: medium)

Date sent: 1 December 1778

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to Mary Hamilton relating to finance, the economic distress of the country and returns from rent. Commenting on the King's recollection of him, he writes that he is not flattered at such 'trivial enquiries' when he has been waiting for so long for 'a more substantial remembrance' in terms of preferment in the Church, and writes that when one has reached the age of fifty it is 'time to be discouraged from the pursuit of favo[u]rs that I had good reason to expect for these twenty years past'. It is some consolation for him that he has acted as a man of honour despite all the broken promises. 'From the number of low & mean Persons in general that fill the bench of Bishops in this Country it wou[l]d seem that our Governors thought the interests of Religion safer in the hands of Schoolmasters and Tutors than in those men of birth & property'. He continues to advise his niece that 'favo[u]r is hardly earned and too frequently thrown away'.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 487 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: George Rowlands, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Ella Dix-Nagra, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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