Single Letter

HAM/1/4/2/10

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Diplomatic Text


Oct /89

      My Dear Sir

      I have this morning received the favor
of yours of the 5th. of this Inst. with the enclosed Bill for
One Thousand Pounds on Meʃsrs. Jones & Co. Bankers in London
& according to your desire I went myself to get it accepted &
according to form, they avail themselves of the Days of Grace,
however it is now the same to me as cash in hand. It comes
in perfect good time as Mr. Greenwood informs me the busineʃs can=
not
be done by the Secretary at War, till next week. I am
sure you have done your part & the confidence you repose
in me adds greatly to the obligation; I know you now per=
fectly
& if I dont forget myself, I must be ever sensible of the
manly manner in which you have done me a very singular
favor. Robert is as you may suppose, in no small joy & knows
the transaction. Our united Compts. to you & Mrs. Dickenson I
remain.
                             My Dear Sir
                                                         Your most Obliged Humble Servt.
Frederick Hamilton

Oxford Street 249.
      October 7th. 1789.[1]



John Dickenson Esqr
Park Gate
near
Chester

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. This dateline appears to the left of the signature.

Normalised Text



      My Dear Sir

      I have this morning received the favor
of yours of the 5th. of this Instant with the enclosed Bill for
One Thousand Pounds on Messrs. Jones & Co. Bankers in London
& according to your desire I went myself to get it accepted &
according to form, they avail themselves of the Days of Grace,
however it is now the same to me as cash in hand. It comes
in perfect good time as Mr. Greenwood informs me the business cannot
be done by the Secretary at War, till next week. I am
sure you have done your part & the confidence you repose
in me adds greatly to the obligation; I know you now perfectly
& if I don't forget myself, I must be ever sensible of the
manly manner in which you have done me a very singular
favor. Robert is as you may suppose, in no small joy & knows
the transaction. Our united Compliments to you & Mrs. Dickenson I
remain.
                             My Dear Sir
                                                         Your most Obliged Humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

Oxford Street 249.
      October 7th. 1789.



John Dickenson Esquire
Parkgate
near
Chester

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. This dateline appears to the left of the signature.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/2/10

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: London

Addressee: John Dickenson

Place received: Parkgate, Wirral, Cheshire

Date sent: 7 October 1789

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson. The letter relates to Dickenson's loan for the payment of Robert Hamilton's commission in the 10th Dragoons, for which Frederick expresses deep gratitude.
    Dated at Oxford Street, [London].
   

Length: 1 sheet, 190 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Huishi Hu, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Kadie Ratchford, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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