Single Letter

HAM/1/4/2/11

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Diplomatic Text


Nov. /89

      Dear Sir,

      I lose no time in returning you thanks for
your letter from Taxal of the 1st. of Novr. which I only
received this morning. I am obliged to you for the
offer of leaving your Thousand Pounds in my hands
upon the security proposed & at 5 pr.Ct. for leʃs inte=
rest
I never cou'd have thought of offering you. I had
rather be your Debtor than almost any other man's
& if I can be off taking the money from Scotland, which
my Agent gave me reason to expect towards the middle
of this month, I certainly will, & I have already
wrote a letter fromto my Agent signifying my in=
clination
, but at the same time expreʃsing my
abhorrence from doing any thing unhandsome by
any Person who may be engaged to him to furnish
the money. I have desir'd an immediate answer for
your satisfaction. If it shou'd fortunately turn



out that I may be at liberty to keep your money,
the Interest of course commenc'd from the day the Bill
was sent from Manchester, the Heretable Bond shall be made
in your name & when you come to Town I will also give
you a collateral Bond of Security upon my personal
Property. The Interest shall be paid punctually every
six months at Mr. Hammersley's in Pall Mall without
the necessity of applying to me, so far for the money,
the favor I know not how to repay. I am happy to
hear your Father has acted so generously by you, this
certainly implies that he is conscious that he has a
deserving Son. I beg you & Mrs. Dickenson will accept
the best Compts of all my Family, be aʃsured we shall be very
glad of seeing you in the Spring. The Cornet is very
happy & is to join his Regiment in February, which is
to relieve the Regt. of light Dragoons now in atten=
dance
upon the King in the Month of May next, soon
after which it will be review'd; we are labouring
hard at the drill both on foot & on horseback
& I really think I shall send a very good recruit



to the Regiment, his form is very good being upwards
of 5 feet 9 Inches with the countenance of a Gentleman.
He is already in poʃseʃsion of a very fine Horse, which
the Riding Master expects will turn out well if he shou'd
the sole credit of him will be mine Adieu My Dear Sir,
believe me ever
                                                         Your faithful & Obliged Humble Serv
Frederick Hamilton

Oxford Street. 249
      November 6th. 1789.[1]



[John Dicke]nson Junr. Esqr.
[Ta]xal
[Chapel] de la Frith
Derbyshire

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red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. This dateline appears to the left of the signature.

Normalised Text



      Dear Sir,

      I lose no time in returning you thanks for
your letter from Taxal of the 1st. of November which I only
received this morning. I am obliged to you for the
offer of leaving your Thousand Pounds in my hands
upon the security proposed & at 5 percent for less interest
I never could have thought of offering you. I had
rather be your Debtor than almost any other man's
& if I can be off taking the money from Scotland, which
my Agent gave me reason to expect towards the middle
of this month, I certainly will, & I have already
wrote a letter to my Agent signifying my inclination
, but at the same time expressing my
abhorrence from doing any thing unhandsome by
any Person who may be engaged to him to furnish
the money. I have desir'd an immediate answer for
your satisfaction. If it should fortunately turn



out that I may be at liberty to keep your money,
the Interest of course commenc'd from the day the Bill
was sent from Manchester, the Heritable Bond shall be made
in your name & when you come to Town I will also give
you a collateral Bond of Security upon my personal
Property. The Interest shall be paid punctually every
six months at Mr. Hammersley's in Pall Mall without
the necessity of applying to me, so far for the money,
the favor I know not how to repay. I am happy to
hear your Father has acted so generously by you, this
certainly implies that he is conscious that he has a
deserving Son. I beg you & Mrs. Dickenson will accept
the best Compliments of all my Family, be assured we shall be very
glad of seeing you in the Spring. The Cornet is very
happy & is to join his Regiment in February, which is
to relieve the Regiment of light Dragoons now in attendance
upon the King in the Month of May next, soon
after which it will be review'd; we are labouring
hard at the drill both on foot & on horseback
& I really think I shall send a very good recruit



to the Regiment, his form is very good being upwards
of 5 feet 9 Inches with the countenance of a Gentleman.
He is already in possession of a very fine Horse, which
the Riding Master expects will turn out well if he should
the sole credit of him will be mine Adieu My Dear Sir,
believe me ever
                                                         Your faithful & Obliged Humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

Oxford Street. 249
      November 6th. 1789.



John Dickenson Junior Esquire
Taxal
Chapel de la Frith
Derbyshire

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 1. This dateline appears to the left of the signature.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/2/11

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: London

Addressee: John Dickenson

Place received: Taxal, Chapel-en-le-Frith

Date sent: 6 November 1789

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson. He thanks Dickenson for his financial support in purchasing for his son Robert the position of cornet in the 10th Dragoons. Robert is to join his regiment in February, when they will relieve the 8th Light Dragoons who are currently in attendance on the King, and Frederick reports that his son is labouring hard at drill to prepare himself. 'I really think I shall send a very good recruit to the Regiment.'
    Dated at Oxford Street, [London].
   

Length: 1 sheet, 443 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Gemma Warren, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Alice Hunter, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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