Single Letter

HAM/1/4/2/14

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Diplomatic Text


April /90[1]

Enclosing a Bank Post Bill for £25.0.0
from Meʃsrs. Ransom Morland & Hammersley
No. 4950 dated 7th. April 1790.

      Dear Sir,


      I was unavoidably detain'd, by the illneʃs of my Curate
till yesterday, at my Living in Suffolk, by which I have been
prevented from acquitting myself to you sooner, which I ought
to have done, & which I hope you will have the goodneʃs to excuse.
I found every thing at Stanton, which is the name of my Living,
on the whole, very satisfactory; a very tolerable House, now well
furnish'd, excellent Offices &c. a charming Country with very good
Roads, & Post Coaches from London daily paʃsing by my House. I hope
you have gone on well with your Works, for that purpose, the
weather has been favorable, tho' in other respects very disagree=
able
for some time past. Pray remember me affectionately to Mrs.
Dickenson who I hope is well as also my little God Daughter,
I remain with sincere regard & esteem.
                             Dear Sir,
                                                         Your faithful Humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

Oxford Street- 249
      April 7th. 1790.[2]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Moved annotation here from below note of enclosure.
 2. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation and signature.

Normalised Text



Enclosing a Bank Post Bill for £25.0.0
from Messrs. Ransom Morland & Hammersley
No. 4950 dated 7th. April 1790.

      Dear Sir,


      I was unavoidably detain'd, by the illness of my Curate
till yesterday, at my Living in Suffolk, by which I have been
prevented from acquitting myself to you sooner, which I ought
to have done, & which I hope you will have the goodness to excuse.
I found every thing at Stanton, which is the name of my Living,
on the whole, very satisfactory; a very tolerable House, now well
furnish'd, excellent Offices etc. a charming Country with very good
Roads, & Post Coaches from London daily passing by my House. I hope
you have gone on well with your Works, for that purpose, the
weather has been favorable, though in other respects very disagreeable
for some time past. Pray remember me affectionately to Mrs.
Dickenson who I hope is well as also my little God-daughter,
I remain with sincere regard & esteem.
                             Dear Sir,
                                                         Your faithful Humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

Oxford Street- 249
      April 7th. 1790.

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Moved annotation here from below note of enclosure.
 2. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation and signature.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/2/14

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: London

Addressee: John Dickenson

Place received: Taxal, Chapel-en-le-Frith (certainty: high)

Date sent: 7 April 1790

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson, relating to Frederick Hamilton's Suffolk living.
    A note on the top of the letter states that enclosed with the letter is a bill for £25 from Ransom Moreland & Hammersley.
    Dated at Oxford Street.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 178 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Rachel Harrison, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Munkhdavaa Oktyabri, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Yiwei Yin, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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