Single Letter

HAM/1/4/2/17

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Diplomatic Text


Sep 1791

      Dear Sir,

      I was very glad to hear of your safe arrival at
Taxal & of your having had so agreeable a meeting
of Friends, who I hope are more composed than when
you left them. I am now sorry that I made you
any proposition on Robert's account, as I much fear
such a companion wou'd break in upon your domes=
tic
quiet; you perceive I have not been unfair in my
representations of him & I am too candid to flatter
you with the hopes of any speedy amendment in
him with such a mind, where the bias is to falsehood
in preference of truth, even in matters of indifference.
You say he has behaved well for some days past, a
poor stock of merit for you to trust to! I can not bring
myself to offer a single argument to persuade you
and Mrs. Dickenson to take the charge of such a
Guest; if however from affection to me you can



make such a sacrifice of your own happineʃs I will leave
him with you, & accede to the Terms you have proposed,
which you may be aʃsured shall be kept secret from
Robert; you must therefore contrive to make him write
to me immediately for my permiʃsion to accept your in=
vitation
of continuing at Taxal for a longer period.
I know he is at this time very ill provided with Cloaths
of every sort; as soon as it is ascertain'd that he is to
remain with you he shall be supplied with every thing
neceʃsary. I prefer ordering every thing for him myself
having met with bad encouragement to trust to his
discretion. I shou'd be glad you wou'd send me the direct=
tion
how I am to send Things to Taxal; having lost
the one you gave me. Mrs. H. & my Daughter desire to be
affectionately rememberd with me to you & Mrs. Dickenson.
I remain with great regard
                             Dear Sir,
                             your faithful Humble Servt
Frederick Hamilton


September 19th. 1791.
No. 19. Orchard St. Portman Sqr.[1]




John Dickenson Esqr.
      Taxal. Chapel in Frith
                             Derby Shire[2]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation.
 2. Postmark 'SE 19 91' below address when unfolded.

Normalised Text



      Dear Sir,

      I was very glad to hear of your safe arrival at
Taxal & of your having had so agreeable a meeting
of Friends, who I hope are more composed than when
you left them. I am now sorry that I made you
any proposition on Robert's account, as I much fear
such a companion would break in upon your domestic
quiet; you perceive I have not been unfair in my
representations of him & I am too candid to flatter
you with the hopes of any speedy amendment in
him with such a mind, where the bias is to falsehood
in preference of truth, even in matters of indifference.
You say he has behaved well for some days past, a
poor stock of merit for you to trust to! I can not bring
myself to offer a single argument to persuade you
and Mrs. Dickenson to take the charge of such a
Guest; if however from affection to me you can



make such a sacrifice of your own happiness I will leave
him with you, & accede to the Terms you have proposed,
which you may be assured shall be kept secret from
Robert; you must therefore contrive to make him write
to me immediately for my permission to accept your invitation
of continuing at Taxal for a longer period.
I know he is at this time very ill provided with Clothes
of every sort; as soon as it is ascertain'd that he is to
remain with you he shall be supplied with every thing
necessary. I prefer ordering every thing for him myself
having met with bad encouragement to trust to his
discretion. I should be glad you would send me the direction
how I am to send Things to Taxal; having lost
the one you gave me. Mrs. Hamilton & my Daughter desire to be
affectionately remembered with me to you & Mrs. Dickenson.
I remain with great regard
                             Dear Sir,
                             your faithful Humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton


September 19th. 1791.
No. 19. Orchard Street Portman Square




John Dickenson Esquire
      Taxal. Chapel in Frith
                             Derbyshire

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation.
 2. Postmark 'SE 19 91' below address when unfolded.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/2/17

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: London

Addressee: John Dickenson

Place received: Taxal, Chapel-en-le-Frith

Date sent: 19 September 1791

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson. The letter relates to a proposal that Robert Hamilton's stay with the Dickensons should be extended. Frederick criticises his son's character: 'I am too candid to flatter you with the hopes of any speedy amendment in him with such a mind, where the bias is to falsehood in preference of truth, even in matters of indifference.'
    Dated at Orchard Street, Portman Square, [London].
   

Length: 3 sheets, 348 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2016/17 provided by The John Rylands Research Institute.

Research assistant: Sarah Connor, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Research assistant: Carla Seabra-Dacosta, MA student, University of Vigo

Transliterator: Xiaoge Liu, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2017)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

Document Image (pdf)