Single Letter

HAM/1/4/2/19

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Diplomatic Text


      Sep /92

      Dear Sir,

      I receiv'd your letter of the 1st. of this Inst. which
I shou'd have thank'd you for immediately had I not
expected the favor of another letter from you in a few days
after with Robert's Account; that letter is now just come
to hand, & as you might be sure I cou'd have no objections
to make to it, I am sorry you did not inform me at the
same time where I might pay the money which I am ready
to do with a thousand thanks as soon as I receive your
instructions, or if you think proper you may draw upon
me for the amount, by a Bill payable at sight. Two Dogs
arrived here from Taxal some time ago, but for what use
I do not well understand, & Robt. has been endeavouring
to sell them, but without succeʃs. Upon your kind informa=
tion
I got him to write to the Servant he had so impru=
dently
engaged, to put him off, & a letter has been receiv'd
from the man with great lamentations for his disappoint=
ment
. A letter was also wrote to the Watch maker at



Manchester, informing him that as the Clock was not finish'd
to the time promised, it wou'd not be received. I have with
much difficulty persuaded Robt. to give me a true state of
his debts, which do not exceed one hundred & thirty pounds;
upwards of sixty of which are for Telescopes & Air Pumps bought
at different shops, the rest for trifling Bills & money borrow'd,
for the whole I have taken upon myself the payment, which
will be final on my part; for what debts he may contract
hereafter, he must be himself responsible, as well as for the
consequences. I propose to make him an allowance of £300. pr.
Annum which is fully as much as he can expect from my In=
come
; my Father had nearly twice as much, when he allow'd
my Brother only £200. Robert has aʃsured me most solemnly that
he will break off his connexion with Risman, I shall how=
ever
endeavor to strengthen this promise by a penal obliga=
tion
.      Robt. for the first week after his arrival was silent
to a surprising degree, but he has of late become much
more cheerful & I must acknowledge behaves very well.
I do not put it in his power to dupe me any further



& I keep him at a very small allowance, which I shall do
till our agreement is completed, when he may dispose of him=
self
& his money as he may think proper; he is determined
he says to return to Kiel for the object of improving him=
self
, which he chuses in preference to any other place, as there
are no English there & as his money will go there much further
than in any other place. I beg to repeat my sincere thanks
to you & Mrs. Dickenson for the kind interest you have always
you have always expreʃs'd for this young man & hope the time
may come when he will be throughly conscious of his obli[gations]
to you both; I do not altogether despair of his amendment,
he now perceives that a perseverance in his errors must [be]
fatal, & this reflection may probably make him more
cautious. It was not in my power to avail myself of your
obliging invitation to Taxal having much busineʃs to
detain me here I beg to unite my best Compts. with Mrs. H.' Robt.
& my Daughter's to you & Mrs. Dickenson & remain
                             Dear Sir
                                  Your Obliged & Affect. Humble Servt.
                                                         Frederick Hamilton
No. 2 Portman Square
      September 24th. 1792[1]




John Dickenson Esqr.[2]
Taxal Chapel in Frith
                             DerbyShire


      F. Hamilton[3]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation and signature.
 2. Postmark 'SE 24 92' on top of address at left.
 3. This line appears at the foot of p.3, written upside down.

Normalised Text



      Dear Sir,

      I receiv'd your letter of the 1st. of this Instant which
I should have thank'd you for immediately had I not
expected the favour of another letter from you in a few days
after with Robert's Account; that letter is now just come
to hand, & as you might be sure I could have no objections
to make to it, I am sorry you did not inform me at the
same time where I might pay the money which I am ready
to do with a thousand thanks as soon as I receive your
instructions, or if you think proper you may draw upon
me for the amount, by a Bill payable at sight. Two Dogs
arrived here from Taxal some time ago, but for what use
I do not well understand, Robert has been endeavouring
to sell them, but without success. Upon your kind information
I got him to write to the Servant he had so imprudently
engaged, to put him off, & a letter has been receiv'd
from the man with great lamentations for his disappointment
. A letter was also written to the Watch maker at



Manchester, informing him that as the Clock was not finish'd
to the time promised, it would not be received. I have with
much difficulty persuaded Robert to give me a true state of
his debts, which do not exceed one hundred & thirty pounds;
upwards of sixty of which are for Telescopes & Air Pumps bought
at different shops, the rest for trifling Bills & money borrow'd,
for the whole I have taken upon myself the payment, which
will be final on my part; for what debts he may contract
hereafter, he must be himself responsible, as well as for the
consequences. I propose to make him an allowance of £300. per
Annum which is fully as much as he can expect from my Income
; my Father had nearly twice as much, when he allow'd
my Brother only £200. Robert has assured me most solemnly that
he will break off his connexion with Risman, I shall however
endeavour to strengthen this promise by a penal obligation
.      Robert for the first week after his arrival was silent
to a surprising degree, but he has of late become much
more cheerful & I must acknowledge behaves very well.
I do not put it in his power to dupe me any further



& I keep him at a very small allowance, which I shall do
till our agreement is completed, when he may dispose of himself
& his money as he may think proper; he is determined
he says to return to Kiel for the object of improving himself
, which he chooses in preference to any other place, as there
are no English there & as his money will go there much further
than in any other place. I beg to repeat my sincere thanks
to you & Mrs. Dickenson for the kind interest you have always
express'd for this young man & hope the time
may come when he will be thoroughly conscious of his obligations
to you both; I do not altogether despair of his amendment,
he now perceives that a perseverance in his errors must be
fatal, & this reflection may probably make him more
cautious. It was not in my power to avail myself of your
obliging invitation to Taxal having much business to
detain me here I beg to unite my best Compliments with Mrs. Hamilton' Robert
& my Daughter's to you & Mrs. Dickenson & remain
                             Dear Sir
                                  Your Obliged & Affectionate Humble Servant
                                                         Frederick Hamilton
No. 2 Portman Square
      September 24th. 1792




John Dickenson Esqr.
Taxal Chapel in Frith
                             DerbyShire


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quotations,
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 1. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation and signature.
 2. Postmark 'SE 24 92' on top of address at left.
 3. This line appears at the foot of p.3, written upside down.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/2/19

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: London

Addressee: John Dickenson

Place received: Taxal, Chapel-en-le-Frith

Date sent: 24 September 1792

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson. He thanks Dickenson for paying his son's debts and asks for instructions on where to pay the money back. The letter notes that two dogs have been sent to his house from Taxal and he has no idea why. His son has attempted to sell them but as yet had no success. Frederick has persuaded his son Robert to write to the servant he so 'imprudently engaged' [probably in Taxal] to stop him coming to London and has received a letter from him full of his disappointment. He, with some difficulty, has persuaded his son to tell him the true amount of his debts which 'do not exceed one hundred & thirty pounds', over sixty pounds of which was for telescopes and air pumps. Frederick notes that this is the last time he will pay his son's debts and Robert in future will have to take the consequences of his own actions. He will make him an allowance of £300 per annum and Robert promises to break off all connection with Risman[?]. Robert has expressed his interest in returning to Kiel, Germany, which may be beneficial, as there are no English there and his money would 'go there much further'.
    Dated at Portman Square.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 614 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Emma Kelly, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Yiwei Yin, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 3 August 2020

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