Single Letter

HAM/1/4/2/21

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Diplomatic Text


My dear Sir,

      I can not well expreʃs my obligations for your very kind letters
which I have received yesterday & to day; as I am aware of the
great danger that attends my dear daughter's disorder my af=
fliction
& anxiety are inexpreʃsible, she was precisely in the
same situation here, three years ago under the care of Dr. Parry,
who had the greatest apprehensions for her but after having been
inflated in the most dreadful manner with excruciating pain
she returned to her usual shape in one night's time, but as she
has had since frequent relapses, I consider her in very great dan=
ger
& am therefore anxious beyond measure that the ablest
advice may be immediately call'd in. Having had many oppor
tunities
of discovering my dearest daughter's excellent disposition
during her late severe trials, I flatterd myself she might be
permitted to enjoy, even in this life, some years of happineʃs, but
if this is not to be granted, it woud ill become me not to submit
to the dispensations of providence with patience & humble
resignation; the reflexion of my having acquitted myself to this
dear & invaluable friend in the crisis of her affliction will
be my principal consolation, shoud it be the will of Pro=



vidence to take her from us. I find myself so overcome with
distreʃs, that I must beg you will excuse my quitting this painful
subject, but it must not be without repeating my most grateful
thanks to you & Mrs. Dickenson for your very affectionate atten
tion
, I remain
                             My dear Sir,
                             Your faithful humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

Brock St. Bath
      May 20th. 1810[1]

My best Compts. to Miʃs Dickenson



John Dickenson Esqr[2]
49. Welbeck Street
London


                             May 20 -- 1810[3]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation and signature.
 2. Postmarks 'E 21MY21 [18]10' split above and below address when unfolded, and 'BATH' above address.
 3. This date appears to the right of the address, written vertically. The postmark makes clear that this cannot be the date of receipt.

Normalised Text


My dear Sir,

      I can not well express my obligations for your very kind letters
which I have received yesterday & to day; as I am aware of the
great danger that attends my dear daughter's disorder my affliction
& anxiety are inexpressible, she was precisely in the
same situation here, three years ago under the care of Dr. Parry,
who had the greatest apprehensions for her but after having been
inflated in the most dreadful manner with excruciating pain
she returned to her usual shape in one night's time, but as she
has had since frequent relapses, I consider her in very great danger
& am therefore anxious beyond measure that the ablest
advice may be immediately call'd in. Having had many opportunities
of discovering my dearest daughter's excellent disposition
during her late severe trials, I flattered myself she might be
permitted to enjoy, even in this life, some years of happiness, but
if this is not to be granted, it would ill become me not to submit
to the dispensations of providence with patience & humble
resignation; the reflexion of my having acquitted myself to this
dear & invaluable friend in the crisis of her affliction will
be my principal consolation, should it be the will of Providence



to take her from us. I find myself so overcome with
distress, that I must beg you will excuse my quitting this painful
subject, but it must not be without repeating my most grateful
thanks to you & Mrs. Dickenson for your very affectionate attention
, I remain
                             My dear Sir,
                             Your faithful humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

Brock Street Bath
      May 20th. 1810

My best Compliments to Miss Dickenson



John Dickenson Esquire
49. Welbeck Street
London


                            

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation and signature.
 2. Postmarks 'E 21MY21 [18]10' split above and below address when unfolded, and 'BATH' above address.
 3. This date appears to the right of the address, written vertically. The postmark makes clear that this cannot be the date of receipt.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/2/21

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: Bath

Addressee: John Dickenson

Place received: London

Date sent: 20 May 1810

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson. The letter relates to the serious illness of Frederick's daughter, Mrs Holman. She suffered the same condition three years ago under the care of Dr Parry, 'who had the greatest apprehensions for her but after having been inflated in the most dreadful manner with excruciating pain she returned to her usual shape in one night's time, but as she has had since frequent relapses, I consider her in very great danger.'
    Dated at Bath.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 285 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Harriet Fitzgerald-Allsopp, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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