Single Letter

HAM/1/4/2/23

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Diplomatic Text


My dear Sir,

      Your letter that has just now come to hand reduces me to a state
of absolute despair; the continual intense pain that my dear Daugr=
has suffer'd during this calamitous illneʃs has brought on a twis=
ting
of the intestines, which I apprehend must terminate in a mor=
tification
. I now repent not having come to Town at the beginning
of her illneʃs, for tho' I cou'd demonstrate no real intelligence, I
cou'd at least show that my affection is without bounds. I have
reason to believe that there is an ample supply in hand to furnish
every neceʃsary expence upon the occasion, of this Mrs. Mann can
give you proper information; it is my wish that the Physicians
shoud be paid most liberally. I must remain in cruel agitation
till Tuesday as no Post leaves London till tomorrow. I have not
strength but to add, that I remain your most faithful & obliged
                                                         humble Servant
                                                              Frederick Hamilton
Bath May 276th 1810.[1]




      John Dickenson Esqr.[2]
No 49 Welbeck Street
                             London


      27 May 1810[3]


      May 1810
Mr. Hamilton[4]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation.
 2. Postmarks 'E 28MY28 1810' and 'BATH' above address when unfolded.
 3. This date appears in the right margin, written vertically.
 4. These lines appear in the left margin, written vertically.

Normalised Text


My dear Sir,

      Your letter that has just now come to hand reduces me to a state
of absolute despair; the continual intense pain that my dear Daughter
has suffer'd during this calamitous illness has brought on a twisting
of the intestines, which I apprehend must terminate in a mortification
. I now repent not having come to Town at the beginning
of her illness, for though I could demonstrate no real intelligence, I
could at least show that my affection is without bounds. I have
reason to believe that there is an ample supply in hand to furnish
every necessary expense upon the occasion, of this Mrs. Mann can
give you proper information; it is my wish that the Physicians
should be paid most liberally. I must remain in cruel agitation
till Tuesday as no Post leaves London till tomorrow. I have not
strength but to add, that I remain your most faithful & obliged
                                                         humble Servant
                                                              Frederick Hamilton
Bath May 26th 1810.




      John Dickenson Esqr.
No 49 Welbeck Street
                             London




     

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation.
 2. Postmarks 'E 28MY28 1810' and 'BATH' above address when unfolded.
 3. This date appears in the right margin, written vertically.
 4. These lines appear in the left margin, written vertically.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/2/23

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: Bath

Addressee: John Dickenson

Place received: London

Date sent: 27 May 1810

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson. Mrs Holman is in great pain because of her illness and her father is in despair and is saddened that he did not go to Town. He fears that 'this calamitous illness' has brought on a 'twisting of the intestines', which will be fatal. He wishes that the physicians be paid most liberally.
    Dated at Bath.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 171 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Benjamin Fearn, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Jenny Toner, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 3 August 2020

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