Single Letter

HAM/1/4/2/26

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Diplomatic Text


      My dear Sir,

      I have just now received your letter of the 7th. Inst. in which you say you
are glad I have proposed to have Mrs. Holman's body open'd for the benefit
of mankind whereas in my last letter to you I most peremptorily forbid
it from my apprehensions of the dangerous consequences from the pu=
trid
effluvia to the innocent proprietors of the house who have been
much attach'd to Mrs. Holman, & who have a family of young children;
if you have read my letter I know not how to account for your aʃsertion.
I therefore repeat my prohibition that no such operation shall take
place at No. 50 in Mortimer St. It wou'd be very cruel to hazard the
safety of Persons to whom my dear daughter has thought herself obli=
ged
. You have either not received my letter or not read it. Sure I am that
I have never written upon that subject to any other person. With your letter
of yesterday I received a very absurd one of three lines from Mr. Holman
communicating the afflicting information that he had now no hopes
of his dear Jane
. I feel the greatest poʃsible regard & affection for
Lady Eliza Halliday, pray tell her so from me. Adieu my Dear Sir, I have
written this with great perturbation & remain most faithfully Yours

Frederick Hamilton

Bath June 8th. 1810



John Dickenson Esqr.[1]
No. 49 Welbeck Street
London

8 June 1810[2]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Postmarks 'E 9 JU 9 1810' and 'BATH' above address when unfolded.
 2. This line appears to right of address panel, written vertically.

Normalised Text


      My dear Sir,

      I have just now received your letter of the 7th. Instant in which you say you
are glad I have proposed to have Mrs. Holman's body open'd for the benefit
of mankind whereas in my last letter to you I most peremptorily forbid
it from my apprehensions of the dangerous consequences from the putrid
effluvia to the innocent proprietors of the house who have been
much attach'd to Mrs. Holman, & who have a family of young children;
if you have read my letter I know not how to account for your assertion.
I therefore repeat my prohibition that no such operation shall take
place at No. 50 in Mortimer Street. It would be very cruel to hazard the
safety of Persons to whom my dear daughter has thought herself obliged
. You have either not received my letter or not read it. Sure I am that
I have never written upon that subject to any other person. With your letter
of yesterday I received a very absurd one of three lines from Mr. Holman
communicating the afflicting information that he had now no hopes
of his dear Jane
. I feel the greatest possible regard & affection for
Lady Eliza Halliday, pray tell her so from me. Adieu my Dear Sir, I have
written this with great perturbation & remain most faithfully Yours

Frederick Hamilton

Bath June 8th. 1810



John Dickenson Esquire
No. 49 Welbeck Street
London

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Postmarks 'E 9 JU 9 1810' and 'BATH' above address when unfolded.
 2. This line appears to right of address panel, written vertically.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/2/26

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: Bath

Addressee: John Dickenson

Place received: London

Date sent: 8 June 1810

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson. He writes that he has just received Dickenson's letter of the 7th in which he proposes that an autopsy is carried out on Mrs Holman for 'the benefit of mankind'. He forbids this as he fears that such an action may infect others, specifically Mrs Mann and the other residents of the house where she was being looked after before she died. Frederick had made it clear in a past letter (HAM/1/4/2/25) that he was against such a procedure.
    Dated at Bath.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 239 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Leo Thompson-Adams, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Stephanie Dobson, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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