Single Letter

HAM/1/4/2/3

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Diplomatic Text


Aug. 1786

      Dear Sir,

      I am extremely obliged to you for your kind
remembrance in sending me a brace of Grouse,
which I received on Monday last in very good
condition. We propose quitting our House in
Bedford Square on Saturday the 26th. of this Inst. ha=
ving
sold it to Mr. Thos. Hankey a Banker in the
City; we are to remove to no. 248 in Oxford Street,
contiguous to which I am building a House upon
a very fine lot of Ground which stands to the South
& commands a most magnificent view of Hyde Park.
This when completed will serve for both a Town
& Country House & will at the same time be a
much leʃs remote situation than Bedford Square.
I beg you will remember us all most affectionate=
ly
to Mrs. Dickenson with whom I condole very



sincerely on the loʃs of her excellent Friend Mrs. Jackson;
I know I ought to have wrote to her upon the occasion,
but those are subjects I am inclined to avoid, knowing
how little can be said to mitigate real affliction. My
Son is in perfect health & amazingly grown, we
expect him this Evening in Bedford Square with a
large Squadron of Boys to celebrate his Birth Day,
having now enterd his 16th. year. Mr. Chauvet is very
well satisfied with him, & he is in general much
liked by his Companions. Lady Stormont[1] is still in
in Kent at a House of Ld. North's, & I am told she is not
very well; her Br. Col. Cathcart arrived a few days ago
from India, & I am told upon no frivolous busineʃs,
he looks ill & much thinner than when he left us 18
months ago; when I saw him yesterday at Lady
Warwick's, my surprise was in deed very great;
he was 6 Months on his paʃsage so that he cou'd
not be informed of Ld. Cornwallis's Appointment,



if he had, I do not know whether it wou'd have pre=
vented
his return. Next Week I expect to be in a
Scene of some confusion removing my Effects and
my Family to my new Habitation Adieu Dr. Sir
believe me with great regard
                             Your faithful & Affectionate
                                                         Humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

Bedford Square
August 18th. 1786.

P.S. I am not yet prepared
upon the busineʃs of the Aʃsignment
of the Heretable Bond, which I have
sent to Scotland.



Honbl. Ld. Hamilton
August 1786

Miʃsr Hamilton[2]

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red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Louisa Murray (née Cathcart), Viscountess of Stormont (c1758-1843), married to David Murray (1727-1796) and cousin of Mary Hamilton.
 2. These two names seem to have no part in this letter.

Normalised Text



      Dear Sir,

      I am extremely obliged to you for your kind
remembrance in sending me a brace of Grouse,
which I received on Monday last in very good
condition. We propose quitting our House in
Bedford Square on Saturday the 26th. of this Instant having
sold it to Mr. Thomas Hankey a Banker in the
City; we are to remove to no. 248 in Oxford Street,
contiguous to which I am building a House upon
a very fine lot of Ground which stands to the South
& commands a most magnificent view of Hyde Park.
This when completed will serve for both a Town
& Country House & will at the same time be a
much less remote situation than Bedford Square.
I beg you will remember us all most affectionately
to Mrs. Dickenson with whom I condole very



sincerely on the loss of her excellent Friend Mrs. Jackson;
I know I ought to have wrote to her upon the occasion,
but those are subjects I am inclined to avoid, knowing
how little can be said to mitigate real affliction. My
Son is in perfect health & amazingly grown, we
expect him this Evening in Bedford Square with a
large Squadron of Boys to celebrate his Birth Day,
having now entered his 16th. year. Mr. Chauvet is very
well satisfied with him, & he is in general much
liked by his Companions. Lady Stormont is still in
Kent at a House of Lord North's, & I am told she is not
very well; her Brother Colonel Cathcart arrived a few days ago
from India, & I am told upon no frivolous business,
he looks ill & much thinner than when he left us 18
months ago; when I saw him yesterday at Lady
Warwick's, my surprise was indeed very great;
he was 6 Months on his passage so that he could
not be informed of Lord Cornwallis's Appointment,



if he had, I do not know whether it would have prevented
his return. Next Week I expect to be in a
Scene of some confusion removing my Effects and
my Family to my new Habitation Adieu Dear Sir
believe me with great regard
                             Your faithful & Affectionate
                                                         Humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

Bedford Square
August 18th. 1786.

P.S. I am not yet prepared
upon the business of the Assignment
of the Heritable Bond, which I have
sent to Scotland.




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quotations,
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 1. Louisa Murray (née Cathcart), Viscountess of Stormont (c1758-1843), married to David Murray (1727-1796) and cousin of Mary Hamilton.
 2. These two names seem to have no part in this letter.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/2/3

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: London

Addressee: John Dickenson

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 18 August 1786

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson. The letter relates to Frederick Hamilton's change of address (see HAM/1/4/3/6). He is to quit Bedford Square and move to Oxford Street. He is building a house that will provide a magnificent view of Hyde Park and will serve as both a Town and a Country residence.
    The letter continues on general and family matters. Their relation Colonel Cathcart has returned from India and looks ill and much thinner than before he went eighteen months ago. Hamilton reports that Cathcart's passage took six months, so that he had not been informed of Lord Cornwallis's appointment, news which might have prevented him returning when he did.
    Dated at Bedford Square, [London].
   

Length: 1 sheet, 397 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Kelly Wilby, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Aina Jabeen-Khan, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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