Single Letter

HAM/1/4/2/30

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Diplomatic Text


      My dear Sir

      Mrs. Mann arrived here yesterday morning, & we were
not long in settling our busineʃs; she had every thing ar=
ranged
in so clear a manner & so corresponding with your
account that not a single difficulty occurrd; it was to be
expected upon such an event great expence must be incurrd,
but by her good management considerable abuses were
prevented. Mr Holman immediately after the death of his
his Wife call'd for her keys, & in the presence of Mrs. Mann
took out of her drawers £100 belonging to me, & £30 in a draft
belonging to mehim which he said he wou'd mention to
me tho' he did not say a word upon the subject, his laying
hands upon the £100 was certainly improper, as I charged
him with none of Mrs. Holman's expences. Since Mrs. Manns
arrival I received a very impertinent letter from him,
complaining that he was much disappointed in his late
meeting with me, in which he expected in addition to



what I had paid him I would have made him a gift to am=
meliorate
his circumstances. As I by no means intend to com=
ply
with his ill founded expectations, I will engage in no
further correspondence with him, upon which I expect in
future every instance of hostility against me in his power.
      I take the opportunity of returning you by Mrs. Mann
a Deed, which has been long in my poʃseʃsion. I have
made her a present of £200 as a testimony of my regard
for her, & of her fidelity & attachment to my late dear daughter
I beg to be remember'd to Mrs. & Miss Dickenson & to aʃure
you that I am
                             My dear Sir,
                             Your most oliged
                                                         & faithful humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

No. 1 Brock St Bath
      July 20th. 1810.[1]



John Dickenson Esqr.


30 July 1810
Mr. H
[2]

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red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation and signature.
 2. These lines appear in the right margin of p.3.

Normalised Text


      My dear Sir

      Mrs. Mann arrived here yesterday morning, & we were
not long in settling our business; she had every thing arranged
in so clear a manner & so corresponding with your
account that not a single difficulty occurrd; it was to be
expected upon such an event great expence must be incurrd,
but by her good management considerable abuses were
prevented. Mr Holman immediately after the death of his
Wife call'd for her keys, & in the presence of Mrs. Mann
took out of her drawers £100 belonging to me, & £30 in a draft
belonging to him which he said he would mention to
me though he did not say a word upon the subject, his laying
hands upon the £100 was certainly improper, as I charged
him with none of Mrs. Holman's expences. Since Mrs. Manns
arrival I received a very impertinent letter from him,
complaining that he was much disappointed in his late
meeting with me, in which he expected in addition to



what I had paid him I would have made him a gift to ameliorate
his circumstances. As I by no means intend to comply
with his ill founded expectations, I will engage in no
further correspondence with him, upon which I expect in
future every instance of hostility against me in his power.
      I take the opportunity of returning you by Mrs. Mann
a Deed, which has been long in my possession. I have
made her a present of £200 as a testimony of my regard
for her, & of her fidelity & attachment to my late dear daughter
I beg to be remember'd to Mrs. & Miss Dickenson & to assure
you that I am
                             My dear Sir,
                             Your most obliged
                                                         & faithful humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

No. 1 Brock Street Bath
      July 20th. 1810.



John Dickenson Esquire


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quotations,
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 1. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation and signature.
 2. These lines appear in the right margin of p.3.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/2/30

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: Bath

Addressee: John Dickenson

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 20 July 1810

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson. Mrs Mann [in whose house Mrs Holman was residing at the time of her death] visited Frederick Hamilton regarding papers relating to Mrs Holman and to impart to him Mrs Holman's last words. She reports that immediately after her death Mr Holman asked for her keys and in her presence took £100 from her drawer which belonged to Frederick Hamilton. Frederick deems his conduct 'certainly improper'. He also received an 'impertinent' letter from Holman stating that he was disappointed with their last meeting, since he had expected Frederick to make him a gift 'to ameliorate his circumstances'. Hamilton presented a gift of £200 to Mrs Mann as a testimony of his regard for her attachment to his daughter.
    Dated at Bath.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 307 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Victoria Murphy, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Ella Dix-Nagra, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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