Single Letter

HAM/1/4/2/31

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Diplomatic Text


My dear Sir,

      Mrs. Mann left me on Saturday the 21st. of July & had in charge
a letter from me to you together with your marriage Settlement,
which I have long since understood cou'd be of no further use,
as you had made a subsequent arrangement; my motive in
returning it to you was perfectly innocent, but as you have
taken no notice of my letter, I fear it has either not been receiv'd,
or that you have taken this transaction differently from
what was my meaning. After having exhibited such un=
common
instances of friendship and attachment to me on
the late afflicting occasion, I shoud abhor myself, cou'd I
have so soon been capable of forgetting my obligations to you
and Mrs. Dickenson; I therefore wish to be relieved from my
anxiety upon this subject; in addition to my present distreʃs I can
ill bear the suspicion of having acted improperly towards
Persons who have so much claim to my esteem, I remain
                             My dear Sir
                             Your faithful humble Servt.

Frederick Hamilton

No. 1 Brock St. Bath
      August 19th. 1810.[1]



      John Dickenson Esqr.[2]
49. Welbeck Street
      single
Cavendish Square

London


Mr Frederick Hamilton
to Mr Dickenson
Aug. 19 1810
[3]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation.
 2. Postmark 'E 29AU2- 18---' above address when unfolded. There also confused traces of other stamps, including the apparent fragment '109', for which see HAM/1/4/2/32.
 3. These lines appear in the right margin of p.2.

Normalised Text


My dear Sir,

      Mrs. Mann left me on Saturday the 21st. of July & had in charge
a letter from me to you together with your marriage Settlement,
which I have long since understood could be of no further use,
as you had made a subsequent arrangement; my motive in
returning it to you was perfectly innocent, but as you have
taken no notice of my letter, I fear it has either not been receiv'd,
or that you have taken this transaction differently from
what was my meaning. After having exhibited such uncommon
instances of friendship and attachment to me on
the late afflicting occasion, I should abhor myself, could I
have so soon been capable of forgetting my obligations to you
and Mrs. Dickenson; I therefore wish to be relieved from my
anxiety upon this subject; in addition to my present distress I can
ill bear the suspicion of having acted improperly towards
Persons who have so much claim to my esteem, I remain
                             My dear Sir
                             Your faithful humble Servant

Frederick Hamilton

No. 1 Brock Street Bath
      August 19th. 1810.



      John Dickenson Esquire
49. Welbeck Street
      single
Cavendish Square

London


(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation.
 2. Postmark 'E 29AU2- 18---' above address when unfolded. There also confused traces of other stamps, including the apparent fragment '109', for which see HAM/1/4/2/32.
 3. These lines appear in the right margin of p.2.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/2/31

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: Bath

Addressee: John Dickenson

Place received: London

Date sent: 19 August 1810

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson. He had sent a letter to Dickenson together with Dickenson's marriage settlement, and as he has not heard back, he fears that Dickenson has not received them or has interpreted the matter differently from Hamilton's intended meaning. He asks Dickenson to write to him as in his 'present distress I can ill bear the suspicion of having acted improperly'.
    Dated at Bath.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 192 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Xiaoxuan Wang, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Gillian Davies, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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