Single Letter

HAM/1/4/2/7

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Diplomatic Text


Sept 1789

      Dear Sir,

      I received a letter yesterday from Mr. Robt. Greville
at Ld. Stormont's at little grove, enclosing one from Col.
Newton of the 10th. Dragoons now at Leicester notifying
the vacancy of a Cornetcy, which by General Pitt's desire
is offerd to my Son, and I am in consequence directed to
lodge in the hands of Meʃsrs. Cox & Greenwood Agents to the
Regt. the Sum of £1,102,10. The limited price by the King's
Regulation. The Recommendation cannot be sent in
to the Secretary at War for his Majesty's approbation
till the Money is actually deposited; but Mr. Greenwood
has been so good as to aʃsure me that he will give me notice
when will be the latest day that the payment can with
propriety be deferr'd. Since I receiv'd the favor of your
last with the Deed -- , I have receiv'd notice from Mr. Balfour
that he expects to receive the Thousand Pounds on the
11th. of November next, Martinmas Day, one of the Terms in



in Scotland for lending money, as it cannot be got in the
middle of a Quarter. You will perceive Dr. Sir that this
money wou'd come too late to answer my present purpose,
& that if I mean to come off with credit, there shou'd be no de=
lay
in my lodging the money; I will therefore with the ut=
most
gratitude accept your very obliging offer; and will
do every thing most scrupulously for your security as well
as for the punctual repayment of the money at the time
you will prescribe. Shou'd it happen to occur to you that
it might be eligible for you to lend a Thousand Pounds upon
the Security of the Heretable Bond with a Collateral
Bond on the Security of my Personal Property, obliging my=
self
& Heirs to repay the money at six months notice, the
busineʃs cou'd be easily settled; but I beg you will be aʃsured
that by this offer I mean your own accommodation solely.
      My Son is not yet informed of the vacancy, nor of your
generous offer in his behalf; these you may be aʃsured
will be subjects of the utmost satisfaction to him.
I shall be happy to hear of your having received benefit
from sea bathing, I fear you wou'd be soon weary of



that detestable place Park Gate. Mrs. Hamilton my Daughter
& Robt. desire to offer their affectionate Compts. with mine
to you & Mrs. Dickenson. I rejoice with you in the satisfac=
tion
you receive from your little Girl & remain
                             My Dear Sir,
                             Your faithful Humble Servt
Frederick Hamilton

Oxford St. 249
      September 25th. 1789.[1]



John Dickenson Esqr[2]
at the Post Office
Taxal Chester
Chapel de la Frith
Parkgate Derbyshire[3]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. These two lines appear to the left of the closing salutation and signature.
 2. Postmarks '[C]HAPPEL ---FRITH' above and 'SE 25' below address when unfolded.
 3. The letter was directed by Hamilton to Taxal. It appears that 'Taxal', 'Chapel de la Frith' and 'Derbyshire' were deleted and the letter redirected to 'the Post Office | Chester'. A second redirection crossed out 'Chester' and substituted 'Parkgate'.

Normalised Text



      Dear Sir,

      I received a letter yesterday from Mr. Robert Greville
at Lord Stormont's at little grove, enclosing one from Colonel
Newton of the 10th. Dragoons now at Leicester notifying
the vacancy of a Cornetcy, which by General Pitt's desire
is offered to my Son, and I am in consequence directed to
lodge in the hands of Messrs. Cox & Greenwood Agents to the
Regiment the Sum of £1,102.10. The limited price by the King's
Regulation. The Recommendation cannot be sent in
to the Secretary at War for his Majesty's approbation
till the Money is actually deposited; but Mr. Greenwood
has been so good as to assure me that he will give me notice
when will be the latest day that the payment can with
propriety be deferr'd. Since I receiv'd the favor of your
last with the Deed -- , I have receiv'd notice from Mr. Balfour
that he expects to receive the Thousand Pounds on the
11th. of November next, Martinmas Day, one of the Terms



in Scotland for lending money, as it cannot be got in the
middle of a Quarter. You will perceive Dear Sir that this
money would come too late to answer my present purpose,
& that if I mean to come off with credit, there should be no delay
in my lodging the money; I will therefore with the utmost
gratitude accept your very obliging offer; and will
do every thing most scrupulously for your security as well
as for the punctual repayment of the money at the time
you will prescribe. Should it happen to occur to you that
it might be eligible for you to lend a Thousand Pounds upon
the Security of the Heritable Bond with a Collateral
Bond on the Security of my Personal Property, obliging myself
& Heirs to repay the money at six months notice, the
business could be easily settled; but I beg you will be assured
that by this offer I mean your own accommodation solely.
      My Son is not yet informed of the vacancy, nor of your
generous offer in his behalf; these you may be assured
will be subjects of the utmost satisfaction to him.
I shall be happy to hear of your having received benefit
from sea bathing, I fear you would be soon weary of



that detestable place Parkgate. Mrs. Hamilton my Daughter
& Robert desire to offer their affectionate Compliments with mine
to you & Mrs. Dickenson. I rejoice with you in the satisfaction
you receive from your little Girl & remain
                             My Dear Sir,
                             Your faithful Humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

Oxford Street 249
      September 25th. 1789.



John Dickenson Esquire



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quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. These two lines appear to the left of the closing salutation and signature.
 2. Postmarks '[C]HAPPEL ---FRITH' above and 'SE 25' below address when unfolded.
 3. The letter was directed by Hamilton to Taxal. It appears that 'Taxal', 'Chapel de la Frith' and 'Derbyshire' were deleted and the letter redirected to 'the Post Office | Chester'. A second redirection crossed out 'Chester' and substituted 'Parkgate'.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/2/7

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: London

Addressee: John Dickenson

Place received: Taxal, Chapel-en-le-Frith / Parkgate, Wirral, Cheshire

Date sent: 25 September 1789

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson. He writes that he has received a letter from Robert Greville, enclosing one from Colonel Newton from the 10th Dragoons noting a vacancy of a cornetcy [the lowest rank of non-commissioned officer] which General Pitt desires to offer to his son. As a consequence of this he is required to pay Messrs Cox & Greenwood [agents to the Regiment] the sum of £1102.10, which is 'the limited price by the King's regulation'. Mr Dickenson has offered to loan Frederick the money, and the letter discusses Frederick's suggestions for securing the loan.
    Dated at Oxford Street, [London].
   

Length: 1 sheet, 438 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Rebecca Paxton, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Sarah Conlon, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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