Single Letter

HAM/1/4/2/9

Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Diplomatic Text


Oct /89

My Dear Sir,

      After having troubled you with a second
letter bearing the same date with yours which I have just
now received, I shou'd think myself inexcusable in
not embracing the first opportunity to return you
my best thanks for having relieved me from very
great anxiety; this I believe I express'd pretty strongly
in my last; my mind is now in a very different state.
It is true my Bankers who have some obligations to
me cou'd not well have refused me, but the applica=
tion
to them wou'd have distreʃs'd me exceedingly. You may be
well aʃsured that I shall have every poʃsible regard
to your interest that you may not suffer any material
inconvenience in consequence of so liberal an act
of friendship. As my busineʃs will be transacted with
Mr. Hammersley & Mr. Greenwood with whom I believe you
are acquainted, I shall feel a secret pleasure in



letting them see the forward part you bear in it. I [am]
very happy to hear that you have found benefit by sea
bathing. If London is in your speculation, pray let me
know, for I shall be sincerely rejoiced to see you & Mrs. Dickenson
I remain
                             My Dear Sir,
                             Your much obliged Humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

Oxford Street 249
      October 5th. 1789.[1]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. This dateline appears to the left of the signature.

Normalised Text



My Dear Sir,

      After having troubled you with a second
letter bearing the same date with yours which I have just
now received, I should think myself inexcusable in
not embracing the first opportunity to return you
my best thanks for having relieved me from very
great anxiety; this I believe I express'd pretty strongly
in my last; my mind is now in a very different state.
It is true my Bankers who have some obligations to
me could not well have refused me, but the application
to them would have distress'd me exceedingly. You may be
well assured that I shall have every possible regard
to your interest that you may not suffer any material
inconvenience in consequence of so liberal an act
of friendship. As my business will be transacted with
Mr. Hammersley & Mr. Greenwood with whom I believe you
are acquainted, I shall feel a secret pleasure in



letting them see the forward part you bear in it. I am
very happy to hear that you have found benefit by sea
bathing. If London is in your speculation, pray let me
know, for I shall be sincerely rejoiced to see you & Mrs. Dickenson
I remain
                             My Dear Sir,
                             Your much obliged Humble Servant
Frederick Hamilton

Oxford Street 249
      October 5th. 1789.

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. This dateline appears to the left of the signature.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/2/9

Correspondence Details

Author: Frederick Hamilton

Place sent: London

Addressee: John Dickenson

Place received: Parkgate, Wirral, Cheshire (certainty: medium)

Date sent: 5 October 1789

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Rev. Frederick Hamilton to John Dickenson. He thanks Dickenson for the money he has provided to aid his son gain a post in the 10th Dragoons and apologises for sending a second letter to Dickenson [Dickenson's response to Frederick first application was sent on the same day as Frederick Hamilton's second application].
    Dated at Oxford Street, [London].
   

Length: 1 sheet, 216 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Laura Smith, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Kristian Coombes, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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