Single Letter

HAM/1/4/3/13

Letter from Jane Holman to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


London. March the 2nd- 1790.


My dear Cousin,

      It was my Intention to have written to you by
Mr: Dickenson, but one Interruption or another - the
Day or two before his Departure, prevented me.
However, perhaps a Letter may be more acceptable to
you now, than it wou'd have been then -- as Mr:
Dickenson wou'd of Course, tell you any little Article
of News that might be to be met with during his Stay
here. I need not tell you how very agreeably surprised
we were to see Mr: Dickenson in London, nor how happy
to hear such good accounts of you and your charming
little Daughter. Our not being to see you and her this
Season is a great Disappointment to us -- however,
your Reasons are so good, that we take Patience, and



comfort ourselves with the Idea that ce qui est différé,
n'est pas perdu
, as the French say.
I dare say your Cottage (as you call it,) will be made
very commodious and pretty, and will do Credit to
Mr: Dickenson's Taste in Architecture, altho' his first
Eʃsay.      I suppose you have heard of my Father's
having exchanged his Living in Ireland for one in
Suffolk -- He has lost considerably by the Exchange, and
yet is not discontented with it -- that sounds rather
odd; but the Fact is, he was not very easy about
holding the Living in Ireland, and never residing
upon it -- This one in Suffolk will serve us for a
Villa in the Summer, and will be some Amusement
to his Mind, so I think all is very well.
My Brother is with his Regiment at Nottingham --
We are in daily Expectation of a Letter from him at
present.
We have not yet had a Concert -- only small musical
Parties en famille -- You ask me about Miʃs Mathew --
she no longer aʃsists me by singing -- She had the good



Taste to despise Mr: Marchesi's[1] Style, and behaved with
so little Politeneʃs to me on the first Season of my learning
of him, that our Intercourse ceased.
We have another great Singer here now -- Sigr: Pacchierotti[2] --
I dare say Mr: Dickenson has mention'd him to you -- he
is, besides, a most amiable, and very clever, Man.
The Opera-House is to be built in Leicester-Square --
Gallini[3] is to have nothing to do with it -- a Mr: O'Reilly is
to have the Management. Mr: Marchesi is expected in
London this Night, to my great Joy. Madame Mara[4] is
to be the first Woman in the serious Opera. The little
Theatre in the Hay-Market is made as commodious as
it can be -- it is not spacious enough to be sure -- but
certainly it is better to have the Opera there, than to have
none. I have been pretty often at the Play this Season,
though poor Mrs: Siddons[5] has not performed -- We have been
very near losing her -- but I am happy to say that she
is now, certainly recovering. I saw her the other Morning
for the first Time -- she is amazingly reduced, but
that is said to be a good Symptom, as Bulk after so
violent an Illneʃs cou'd not be natural -- consequently,



wou'd be unwholesome. She was in very tolerable Spirits,
and looked very handsome and interesting.
I heard good Accounts of my Sister, a few Days ago, from
a Gentleman just come from Dublin -- I hear oftener
of her than from her, for she is a lazy Creature
at writing.
I am sure nothing wou'd make my Brother more happy
than visiting you and Mr: Dickenson, were he in
your Neighbourhood -- and I dare say his Regiment will
be sometimes quartered at Manchester
You tell me that I am mistaken, for that your Daughter
is not spoilt -- You are mistaken yourself, for I
never imagined she was -- I am too well persuaded
of your excellent Judgement in the Management
of Youth, to fear your spoiling her. As to Grand-
Papa
, I don't know what to say about him, for
Mr: Dickenson says he is pretty much under the
young Lady's Dominion. I long to see her -- I hear
much of her.
My Father and Mother join in best Wishes and Regards
to you and Mr: Dickenson, and I remain
                                                         affectionately yours.
Jane Hamilton

P.S. Pray remember me to
Mr: Dickenson.[6]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Luigi Marchesi (1754-1829), Italian castrato singer.
 2. Gaspare Pacchierotti (1740-1821), Italian castrato singer.
 3. Sir John Andrew Gallini (born Giovanni Andrea Battista Gallini) (1728-1805), Italian dancer, choreographer and impresario.
 4. Gertrud Elisabeth Mara (née Schmeling) (1749-1833), operatic soprano based in London from 1784 to 1802, 'recognized as the greatest singer that Germany had produced' (Wikipedia). See also HAM/1/15/1/24.
 5. Sarah Siddons (née Kemble) (1755-1831), famous actress, friend of Mary Hamilton.
 6. This postscript appears to the left of the signature.

Normalised Text


London. March the 2nd- 1790.


My dear Cousin,

      It was my Intention to have written to you by
Mr: Dickenson, but one Interruption or another the
Day or two before his Departure, prevented me.
However, perhaps a Letter may be more acceptable to
you now, than it would have been then -- as Mr:
Dickenson would of Course, tell you any little Article
of News that might be to be met with during his Stay
here. I need not tell you how very agreeably surprised
we were to see Mr: Dickenson in London, nor how happy
to hear such good accounts of you and your charming
little Daughter. Our not being to see you and her this
Season is a great Disappointment to us -- however,
your Reasons are so good, that we take Patience, and



comfort ourselves with the Idea that ce qui est différé,
n'est pas perdu
, as the French say.
I dare say your Cottage (as you call it,) will be made
very commodious and pretty, and will do Credit to
Mr: Dickenson's Taste in Architecture, although his first
Essay.      I suppose you have heard of my Father's
having exchanged his Living in Ireland for one in
Suffolk -- He has lost considerably by the Exchange, and
yet is not discontented with it -- that sounds rather
odd; but the Fact is, he was not very easy about
holding the Living in Ireland, and never residing
upon it -- This one in Suffolk will serve us for a
Villa in the Summer, and will be some Amusement
to his Mind, so I think all is very well.
My Brother is with his Regiment at Nottingham --
We are in daily Expectation of a Letter from him at
present.
We have not yet had a Concert -- only small musical
Parties en famille -- You ask me about Miss Mathew --
she no longer assists me by singing -- She had the good



Taste to despise Mr: Marchesi's Style, and behaved with
so little Politeness to me the first Season of my learning
of him, that our Intercourse ceased.
We have another great Singer here now -- Signor Pacchierotti --
I dare say Mr: Dickenson has mention'd him to you -- he
is, besides, a most amiable, and very clever, Man.
The Opera-House is to be built in Leicester-Square --
Gallini is to have nothing to do with it -- a Mr: O'Reilly is
to have the Management. Mr: Marchesi is expected in
London this Night, to my great Joy. Madame Mara is
to be the first Woman in the serious Opera. The little
Theatre in the Hay-Market is made as commodious as
it can be -- it is not spacious enough to be sure -- but
certainly it is better to have the Opera there, than to have
none. I have been pretty often at the Play this Season,
though poor Mrs: Siddons has not performed -- We have been
very near losing her -- but I am happy to say that she
is now, certainly recovering. I saw her the other Morning
for the first Time -- she is amazingly reduced, but
that is said to be a good Symptom, as Bulk after so
violent an Illness could not be natural -- consequently,



would be unwholesome. She was in very tolerable Spirits,
and looked very handsome and interesting.
I heard good Accounts of my Sister, a few Days ago, from
a Gentleman just come from Dublin -- I hear oftener
of her than from her, for she is a lazy Creature
at writing.
I am sure nothing would make my Brother more happy
than visiting you and Mr: Dickenson, were he in
your Neighbourhood -- and I dare say his Regiment will
be sometimes quartered at Manchester
You tell me that I am mistaken, for that your Daughter
is not spoilt -- You are mistaken yourself, for I
never imagined she was -- I am too well persuaded
of your excellent Judgement in the Management
of Youth, to fear your spoiling her. As to Grand-
Papa
, I don't know what to say about him, for
Mr: Dickenson says he is pretty much under the
young Lady's Dominion. I long to see her -- I hear
much of her.
My Father and Mother join in best Wishes and Regards
to you and Mr: Dickenson, and I remain
                                                         affectionately yours.
Jane Hamilton

P.S. Pray remember me to
Mr: Dickenson.

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Luigi Marchesi (1754-1829), Italian castrato singer.
 2. Gaspare Pacchierotti (1740-1821), Italian castrato singer.
 3. Sir John Andrew Gallini (born Giovanni Andrea Battista Gallini) (1728-1805), Italian dancer, choreographer and impresario.
 4. Gertrud Elisabeth Mara (née Schmeling) (1749-1833), operatic soprano based in London from 1784 to 1802, 'recognized as the greatest singer that Germany had produced' (Wikipedia). See also HAM/1/15/1/24.
 5. Sarah Siddons (née Kemble) (1755-1831), famous actress, friend of Mary Hamilton.
 6. This postscript appears to the left of the signature.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Jane Holman to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/3/13

Correspondence Details

Author: Jane Holman (née Hamilton)

Place sent: London

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: Taxal, Chapel-en-le-Frith (certainty: low)

Date sent: 2 March 1790

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Jane Hamilton to Mary Hamilton, concerning family news. She reports that her father [Rev. Frederick Hamilton] has exchanged his living in Ireland for one in Suffolk, and although this is an economic loss he is not unhappy about the change as he never felt comfortable about holding the living in Ireland and never residing there. She writes that the Suffolk living will serve the family as a villa for the summer months and 'will be some Amusement to his Mind'.
    The letter refers to music, in which Jane has a great interest and in which she has been taking lessons. She reports that the operatic singer Pacchierotti [Gaspare Pacchierotti (1740-1821)] is in London, and that he is a most 'amiable' man (see HAM/1/4/2/12). She reports that the Opera House is to be built in Leicester Square and that Gallini [Sir John Andrew Gallini (born Giovanni Andrea Battista Gallini) (1728-1805), Italian dancer, choreographer and impresario] is to have nothing to do with it. She also reports that to her great joy Madame Mara [Gertrud Elisabeth Mara (née Schmeling), German singer] 'is to be the first woman in the serious Opera'. The theatre in the Hay-Market, although small, is still better than having none at all. Mrs. Siddons [Sarah Siddons (née Kemble) (1755-1831), famous actress, friend of Mary Hamilton] has been ill and Hamilton at one point feared for her life. She is recovering now and after a visit to her Jane Hamilton noted that although in good spirits 'she is amazingly reduced, but that is said to be a good Symptom, as Bulk after so violent an Illness cou'd not be natural'. The remainder of the letter is concerned with news of her sister, who is now in Dublin, and Louisa Dickenson.
    Dated at London.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 715 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2014/15 and 2015/16 provided by the Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Donald Alasdair Morrison, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Adriana Pérez-Pazo, dissertation student, University of Vigo (submitted March 2015)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 11 April 2019

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