Single Letter

HAM/1/4/3/24

Letter from Jane Holman to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


London. Nov. 12th: 1807.


By return of Post, my dearest Cousin,
I sincerely thank you and Mr: Dickenson,
for your extreme kindneʃs; by which,
at a future period, I dare say, I may
be able to profit; but, after what I have
told you, I have no hesitation in avowing,
that I am now in a very uneasy
suspense, and correspondence with Mr: Holman,
relative to material pecuniary concerns;
till the arrangement of which, I am unable
to decide what to do for the best: of course,
our consultations would be ineffective till
I have received my answer upon this
subject; and I am likewise, in the act
of collecting together, whatever little matters
I can call my own from our place in Herefordshire, such as Books, &c. &c. --
I believe I omitted in my last, telling
you the only good there is to tell, about me:



namely, that, by the affection and generosity
of my dear Father, I shall at a future
(I hope a distant) period, be out of the
reach of pecuniary embarraʃsment. He
has purchased an Annuity for me, which,
at his decease, will be vested in the hands
of Trustees, for my exclusive use.
      For the present, my Income must be
contracted; but if Mr: H. behave as he ought,
(of which I grieve to say, in the present fatal
delusion that poʃseʃses him, I have my doubts)
I might live upon it with comfort, upon
the moderate scale that would content
me.      You may judge of my present state
of mind. It is no small proof of your
friendship that you wish to encounter
my company; for even my singing, which
used to help out a little, is, by grief and
illness, extinct: whether it will return, de-
pends
, I suppose, on whether things go on so
as to allow me any peace of mind. I hope to



Heaven I shall not be involved in any dispute
with Mr: H., as to what is my due. Though his
conduct is certainly very blamable, I cannot
help retaining such an affection for him,
as would render his putting himself still
more in the wrong, a serious grief to me.
I ought to have had some account before
now, from him, on this point: I suppose
he cannot long delay it; and when I
know what I am to expect, you shall
hear from me again, my dear Cousin.
So rumours had reached you: they have,
by what I now understand, been long on
foot; but I was wilfully slow of belief.
How could one credit ill reports of a
man who had for so long a period, behaved with
the utmost affection and kindneʃs? I
believe the weakneʃs and inconstancy of
human nature, would be an endleʃs disqui-
sition
; so, I will not enter upon it here.
I will add a repetition of the extreme
obligation I feel, to you and Mr: Dickenson; with
my kindest love to him, and my Cousin Louisa.



I hope your health is perfectly re-established.
      I am engaged in a correspondence of consul-
tation
, with my Father. I have no expectation
of him in town, immediately, on account of
the season. Besides, as I said before, I am by no
means certain that he will remove at all.
He has shewn me the greatest kindneʃs.



I am very glad I wrote to you before you
finished your last; lest you should not have been
convinced that I should have written independently.
      Adieu, my dear Cousin -- believe me
your most obliged & affectionate

Jane Holman.[1]


It is needleʃs, I hope, to say, how happy
I shall be, to see you all, when I am able.[2]

Mrs: Dickenson[3]
Leighton House
Leighton Buzzard
Bedfordshire
Single.[4]

Mrs. Holman
Mr. Hamiltons
Daughter
[5]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. This section appears at bottom of p.3 below the address when unfolded.
 2. Moved postscript here from right side of address panel in centre of p.3 when unfolded, written vertically.
 3. Postmark 'C NO 13 [1]807' to left of address when unfolded.
 4. Moved address panel here from centre of p.3 when unfolded, written vertically.
 5. Moved annotation here from left side of address panel in centre of p.3 when unfolded.

Normalised Text


London. November 12th: 1807.


By return of Post, my dearest Cousin,
I sincerely thank you and Mr: Dickenson,
for your extreme kindness; by which,
at a future period, I dare say, I may
be able to profit; but, after what I have
told you, I have no hesitation in avowing,
that I am now in a very uneasy
suspense, and correspondence with Mr: Holman,
relative to material pecuniary concerns;
till the arrangement of which, I am unable
to decide what to do for the best: of course,
our consultations would be ineffective till
I have received my answer upon this
subject; and I am likewise, in the act
of collecting together, whatever little matters
I can call my own from our place in Herefordshire, such as Books, &c. &c. --
I believe I omitted in my last, telling
you the only good there is to tell, about me:



namely, that, by the affection and generosity
of my dear Father, I shall at a future
(I hope a distant) period, be out of the
reach of pecuniary embarrassment. He
has purchased an Annuity for me, which,
at his decease, will be vested in the hands
of Trustees, for my exclusive use.
      For the present, my Income must be
contracted; but if Mr: Holman behave as he ought,
(of which I grieve to say, in the present fatal
delusion that possesses him, I have my doubts)
I might live upon it with comfort, upon
the moderate scale that would content
me.      You may judge of my present state
of mind. It is no small proof of your
friendship that you wish to encounter
my company; for even my singing, which
used to help out a little, is, by grief and
illness, extinct: whether it will return, depends
, I suppose, on whether things go on so
as to allow me any peace of mind. I hope to



Heaven I shall not be involved in any dispute
with Mr: Holman, as to what is my due. Though his
conduct is certainly very blamable, I cannot
help retaining such an affection for him,
as would render his putting himself still
more in the wrong, a serious grief to me.
I ought to have had some account before
now, from him, on this point: I suppose
he cannot long delay it; and when I
know what I am to expect, you shall
hear from me again, my dear Cousin.
So rumours had reached you: they have,
by what I now understand, been long on
foot; but I was wilfully slow of belief.
How could one credit ill reports of a
man who had for so long a period, behaved with
the utmost affection and kindness? I
believe the weakness and inconstancy of
human nature, would be an endless disquisition
; so, I will not enter upon it here.
I will add a repetition of the extreme
obligation I feel, to you and Mr: Dickenson; with
my kindest love to him, and my Cousin Louisa.



I hope your health is perfectly re-established.
      I am engaged in a correspondence of consultation
, with my Father. I have no expectation
of him in town, immediately, on account of
the season. Besides, as I said before, I am by no
means certain that he will remove at all.
He has shewn me the greatest kindness.



I am very glad I wrote to you before you
finished your last; lest you should not have been
convinced that I should have written independently.
      Adieu, my dear Cousin -- believe me
your most obliged & affectionate

Jane Holman.


It is needless, I hope, to say, how happy
I shall be, to see you all, when I am able.

Mrs: Dickenson
Leighton House
Leighton Buzzard
Bedfordshire
Single.

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. This section appears at bottom of p.3 below the address when unfolded.
 2. Moved postscript here from right side of address panel in centre of p.3 when unfolded, written vertically.
 3. Postmark 'C NO 13 [1]807' to left of address when unfolded.
 4. Moved address panel here from centre of p.3 when unfolded, written vertically.
 5. Moved annotation here from left side of address panel in centre of p.3 when unfolded.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Jane Holman to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/3/24

Correspondence Details

Author: Jane Holman (née Hamilton)

Place sent: London

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: Leighton Buzzard, Beds.

Date sent: 12 November 1807

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Mrs Jane Holman née Hamilton to Mary Hamilton. The letter relates to the estrangement of Jane Holman and her husband. Jane Holman is in correspondence with her husband in relation to 'monetary concerns' and notes that her income at present is limited. She hopes her husband will 'behave as he ought' but doubts that he will. Even though he has treated her poorly, Holman writes of her continuing affection for her husband.
    She reports that her father, Frederick Hamilton, has purchased an annuity for her (see HAM/1/4/2/20), 'which at his decease, will be vested in the hands of Trustees, for my exclusive use', and will save her from financial embarrassment.
    Dated at London.
   

Length: 4 sheets, 619 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2016/17 provided by The John Rylands Research Institute.

Research assistant: Sarah Connor, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Research assistant: Carla Seabra-Dacosta, MA student, University of Vigo

Transliterator: Jocelyn Horndern, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2017)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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