Single Letter

HAM/1/4/3/9

Letter from Jane Holman to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


March /87

      I am glad to take the Opportunity of Miʃs
Glover's[1] going to Bath, to write to you, my dear
Mrs: Dickenson. -- I beg leave to renew my Congratu-
lations
to you on your Daughter, who I hope,
continues well -- Pray, how soon do you mean to
present her to us? -- Miʃs Glover is all impatience
to see you, and the little Stranger, as well as
Mrs: Glover[2] -- I think the Excursion will be of
great use to the former; at least I hope so -- she
has been but indifferent lately.
      We have had a good deal of Music this Winter, for
which our Liking does not diminish -- 'Tis very
croʃs of you, not to come among us, to hear some



of it. I believe my Father told you what a Giant
Robert was grown -- he comes home every Sunday,
now that the Days are long enough for him
to return to Kensington after Dinner -- so you
may imagine, he perfectly approves of our Situa-
tion
. You wish for an Account of the Plan of our
House -- here it is -- The Front 50 Feet, looking to the
South, with a small Court, parted off from the Street
by an Iron Rail. The Hall 22- by 15-, with a large
Window, and a Fire-Place: shut off from the back
and best Stair-Case with a Door leading to each.
After you get out of the Hall, you turn to the Right,
which brings you to the Dining-Parlour, facing the
South; with three Windows -- the Chimney at the End --
The Dimensions, 30- by 22- and 14 Feet high. A Door
out of that, leads you to a Back-Parlour, with a large
Bow-Window -- 25- by 21- 14 Feet high. A Door out of
that, leads to a small Dreʃsing-Room -- &c. --
You go up a very handsome Stair-Case, not a winding



one, nor lighted by a Sky-Light, but a straight Stair-Case,
lighted by a large Window -- this Stair-Case goes no
higher than the Drawing-Room Floor. You now come
into an Anti-Room, 22 by 15- and 16 Feet high; with
two Windows looking to the South -- consequently to the
Park. A large folding Door at the Side of this AntiRoom,
lets you in a Drawing Room 30 by 22 16 feet high. A large folding Door at the Side of this Room,
lets you into a back Drawing-Room, 25 by 21- 16
Feet high -- with a Bow.-Window. You go up a back
Stair-Case to the Attics -- there are three Rooms to the
Park, and two backwards, with the same Number
of Garrets. There is a Kitchen out of the House,
and most excellent Offices in the House, such as a capital
House-Keepers Room, the same Size as the Back-Parlour,
with a Servants'-Hall, Butler's Pantry, and a Cellar
that will do Justice to the cheap Claret we are told
we are to have. Add to all this, the most magnificent
View that can poʃsibly be conceiv'd, over the Park,
Kensington Gardens, and the Surry Hills, and you
will say my Father has been very judicious in the
choice of his Situation -- and as to the Plan of the House, it
is allow'd to be the best calculated for comfortable habitation,
that can poʃsibly be -- at the same time, it has a most



elegant, and Gentleman-like Appearance. I forgot to mention,
that the best Drawing Room (30 feet by 22- and 16 feet high,)
has three Windows to the Park, and the Chimney at the end.
If you are tir'd with this long account, remember you ask'd
for it.      Pray remember me to Mr: Dickenson -- and also,

[3]

my Father and Mother, and Brother, who beg likewise
to be remember'd to you. I hope the time is not
very distant when you will introduce the young Lady
to us -- in the mean time I remain, with best Wishes to her
and you, -- my dear Cousin, yours sincerely --
J: Hamilton.

London March 20th: 1787.

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Mary Glover, daughter of Richard Glover (1712-1785), English writer and politician, best known for his epic poem Leonidas (1737).
 2. Eleanor Glover, mother of Miss Glover and widow of Richard Glover.
 3. The large space left blank in centre of p.3 when unfolded was not in the event needed for an address, presumably thanks to Miss Glover.

Normalised Text



      I am glad to take the Opportunity of Miss
Glover's going to Bath, to write to you, my dear
Mrs: Dickenson. -- I beg leave to renew my Congratulations
to you on your Daughter, who I hope,
continues well -- Pray, how soon do you mean to
present her to us? -- Miss Glover is all impatience
to see you, and the little Stranger, as well as
Mrs: Glover -- I think the Excursion will be of
great use to the former; at least I hope so -- she
has been but indifferent lately.
      We have had a good deal of Music this Winter, for
which our Liking does not diminish -- 'Tis very
cross of you, not to come among us, to hear some



of it. I believe my Father told you what a Giant
Robert was grown -- he comes home every Sunday,
now that the Days are long enough for him
to return to Kensington after Dinner -- so you
may imagine, he perfectly approves of our Situation
. You wish for an Account of the Plan of our
House -- here it is -- The Front 50 Feet, looking to the
South, with a small Court, parted off from the Street
by an Iron Rail. The Hall 22- by 15-, with a large
Window, and a Fire-Place: shut off from the back
and best Stair-Case with a Door leading to each.
After you get out of the Hall, you turn to the Right,
which brings you to the Dining-Parlour, facing the
South; with three Windows -- the Chimney at the End --
The Dimensions, 30- by 22- and 14 Feet high. A Door
out of that, leads you to a Back-Parlour, with a large
Bow-Window -- 25- by 21- 14 Feet high. A Door out of
that, leads to a small Dressing-Room -- &c. --
You go up a very handsome Stair-Case, not a winding



one, nor lighted by a Sky-Light, but a straight Stair-Case,
lighted by a large Window -- this Stair-Case goes no
higher than the Drawing-Room Floor. You now come
into an Anteroom, 22 by 15- and 16 Feet high; with
two Windows looking to the South -- consequently to the
Park. A large folding Door at the Side of this Anteroom,
lets you in a Drawing Room 30 by 22 16 feet high. A large folding Door at the Side of this Room,
lets you into a back Drawing-Room, 25 by 21- 16
Feet high -- with a Bow.-Window. You go up a back
Stair-Case to the Attics -- there are three Rooms to the
Park, and two backwards, with the same Number
of Garrets. There is a Kitchen out of the House,
and most excellent Offices in the House, such as a capital
House-Keepers Room, the same Size as the Back-Parlour,
with a Servants'-Hall, Butler's Pantry, and a Cellar
that will do Justice to the cheap Claret we are told
we are to have. Add to all this, the most magnificent
View that can possibly be conceiv'd, over the Park,
Kensington Gardens, and the Surrey Hills, and you
will say my Father has been very judicious in the
choice of his Situation -- and as to the Plan of the House, it
is allow'd to be the best calculated for comfortable habitation,
that can possibly be -- at the same time, it has a most



elegant, and Gentleman-like Appearance. I forgot to mention,
that the best Drawing Room (30 feet by 22- and 16 feet high,)
has three Windows to the Park, and the Chimney at the end.
If you are tir'd with this long account, remember you ask'd
for it.      Pray remember me to Mr: Dickenson -- and also,



my Father and Mother, and Brother, who beg likewise
to be remember'd to you. I hope the time is not
very distant when you will introduce the young Lady
to us -- in the mean time I remain, with best Wishes to her
and you, -- my dear Cousin, yours sincerely --
Jane Hamilton.

London March 20th: 1787.

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Mary Glover, daughter of Richard Glover (1712-1785), English writer and politician, best known for his epic poem Leonidas (1737).
 2. Eleanor Glover, mother of Miss Glover and widow of Richard Glover.
 3. The large space left blank in centre of p.3 when unfolded was not in the event needed for an address, presumably thanks to Miss Glover.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Jane Holman to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/3/9

Correspondence Details

Author: Jane Holman (née Hamilton)

Place sent: London

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: Bath (certainty: high)

Date sent: 20 March 1787

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Jane Hamilton to Mary Hamilton. The letter congratulates Mary on the birth of her daughter, Louisa. Miss Glover, who will deliver the letter, is to visit Bath and looks forward to seeing Mary Hamilton and 'the little stranger' there. The letter also provides a detailed description of the Hamiltons' new house on Oxford Street, which includes a cellar which she is told 'will do Justice to the cheap Claret [...] [they] are to have'. It is a large house with an impressive view of Kensington Gardens. The letter ends with Jane's hopes that it will not be too long before they meet again.
    Dated at London.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 651 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2014/15 and 2015/16 provided by the Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Donald Alasdair Morrison, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Adriana Pérez-Pazo, dissertation student, University of Vigo (submitted March 2015)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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