Single Letter

HAM/1/4/5/5

Letter from Lady Catherine Hamilton to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


4

      typed from X only.[1]
      probably Janyy. 1777

      You will excuse me My
Dr Miʃs Hamilton I am sure for not having
wrote before when I tell you that I have
scarce had a moment to myself since I
came to Town, added to that my teizing
Cough seized me as I had foretold the Night
I came -- I am really concern'd to hear your
poor Mama has had such a fall but
I hope by this time she is quite reesta
blish'd
-- I wish it was in my power to make
her mind & body easy -- we have had no letter
from Mr Frederick Hamilton (who I hear wants
to give up his Living in Ireland) & Hamilton has
been so hurry'd that he has not yet been
able to see Mr Hamilton of Gate Street, but
will take the very first oppertunity of doing
so, & we both heartily join in wishing every
thing was settled to your satisfaction -- Ly



Ly Helton who has been with me this
evening always enquires very kindly after
Mrs Hamilton & you -- Thursday[2] thus far
My Dr Miʃs Hamilton was wrote some
days ago; since which my nerves have
been so much affected that I have not
been able to resume my pen -- & now
that I do, my stomach suffers so much
that you must excuse my writing a
very short letter -- Hamilton begs your
acceptance of a piece of Florence Sattin
with the trimming to make you a Negligé
which he hopes you will wear for his
Sake -- I intend sending it by the Coach on
Saturday -- in a box, with a little parcel
of the pepper mint drops for Mrs Hamilton
I send but few of them at a time as they
do not keep well -- & now I must take
my leave -- Our kind love attends Mrs Hamilton



& I am
My Dr Miʃs Hamilton
                                                         Your most Affecte Aunt
C Hamilton


Kings Mews
Thursday Janry. ye 24th-[3]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. The mark 'X' mentioned here is not visible in the body of the letter, and the letter does not appear to be quoted in Anson & Anson (1925).
 2. The day of resumption of the letter is set off from surrounding text by being placed slightly higher than usual, with three faint horizontal strokes beneath.
 3. 24 January 1777 was actually a Friday.

Normalised Text



     
     

      You will excuse me My
Dear Miss Hamilton I am sure for not having
wrote before when I tell you that I have
scarce had a moment to myself since I
came to Town, added to that my teasing
Cough seized me as I had foretold the Night
I came -- I am really concern'd to hear your
poor Mama has had such a fall but
I hope by this time she is quite reestablish'd
-- I wish it was in my power to make
her mind & body easy -- we have had no letter
from Mr Frederick Hamilton (who I hear wants
to give up his Living in Ireland) & Hamilton has
been so hurry'd that he has not yet been
able to see Mr Hamilton of Gate Street, but
will take the very first opportunity of doing
so, & we both heartily join in wishing every
thing was settled to your satisfaction --



Lady Helton who has been with me this
evening always enquires very kindly after
Mrs Hamilton & you -- Thursday thus far
My Dear Miss Hamilton was wrote some
days ago; since which my nerves have
been so much affected that I have not
been able to resume my pen -- & now
that I do, my stomach suffers so much
that you must excuse my writing a
very short letter -- Hamilton begs your
acceptance of a piece of Florence Satin
with the trimming to make you a Negligée
which he hopes you will wear for his
Sake -- I intend sending it by the Coach on
Saturday -- in a box, with a little parcel
of the pepper mint drops for Mrs Hamilton
I send but few of them at a time as they
do not keep well -- & now I must take
my leave -- Our kind love attends Mrs Hamilton



& I am
My Dear Miss Hamilton
                                                         Your most Affectionate Aunt
Catherine Hamilton


Kings Mews
Thursday January the 24th-

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. The mark 'X' mentioned here is not visible in the body of the letter, and the letter does not appear to be quoted in Anson & Anson (1925).
 2. The day of resumption of the letter is set off from surrounding text by being placed slightly higher than usual, with three faint horizontal strokes beneath.
 3. 24 January 1777 was actually a Friday.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Lady Catherine Hamilton to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/5/5

Correspondence Details

Author: Lady Catherine Hamilton

Place sent: London

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 24 January [?1777]
notAfter 28 November 1778 (precision: high)

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Lady Catherine Hamilton to Mary Hamilton. The letter relates to Lady Hamilton's health and family news. She apologises for not writing earlier, but she has had hardly a moment to herself since returning to London. She notes that her husband, Sir William, asks that Mary Hamilton accept his gift of a piece of Florence Satin with trimming, which he hopes she will use.
    Dated at King's Mews, [London].
    Original reference No. 4.
   

Length: 3 sheets, 319 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2016/17 provided by The John Rylands Research Institute.

Research assistant: Sarah Connor, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Research assistant: Carla Seabra-Dacosta, MA student, University of Vigo

Transliterator: Lucy Campbell, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2017)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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