Single Letter

HAM/1/4/7/3

Letter from Sir William Hamilton to Charles Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


My Dear Brother

      I yesterday kiʃsed his Majesty's
hand & am now vulgarly call'd, His Excellency
but the most material part is the payt
beginning. My Br. Fred: has given me his
share of the family china & I was thinking
that if I had a few more it wou'd save
my buying a great deal of plate for
I might then do with only a first Course
of Plate, & therefore if you wou'd be so
kind as to let me have what remains of
yours I will send you some good China
in return & when my Envoyship is at an






end you shall have what remains again, if
you have the least objection I beg you will
not do it, but realy I beleive it will save
me at least 500£ if you can conveniently
to yourself do it the sooner you send them
to me the better as a ship is soon going
to Naples. I set out next week for Colby
but shall be in London again about the
8th of August when I hope by some means
or other to see you -- Mrs H. joins in love to
you & yours & I am ever My Dr. Br.
                                                         most affectionately Yrs
W Hamilton

Mews July 14th. 1764

Sir Wm Hamilton[1]

to his brother Hon' Charles
Hamilton. July 1764
[2]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Moved annotation (ann1) here from top of p.2. It must postdate William Hamilton's knighthood in 1772.
 2. Moved annotation (ann2) here from top of p.2.

Normalised Text


My Dear Brother

      I yesterday kissed his Majesty's
hand & am now vulgarly call'd, His Excellency
but the most material part is the payment
beginning. My Brother Frederick has given me his
share of the family china & I was thinking
that if I had a few more it would save
my buying a great deal of plate for
I might then do with only a first Course
of Plate, & therefore if you would be so
kind as to let me have what remains of
yours I will send you some good China
in return & when my Envoyship is at an






end you shall have what remains again, if
you have the least objection I beg you will
not do it, but really I believe it will save
me at least 500£ if you can conveniently
to yourself do it the sooner you send them
to me the better as a ship is soon going
to Naples. I set out next week for Colby
but shall be in London again about the
8th of August when I hope by some means
or other to see you -- Mrs Hamilton joins in love to
you & yours & I am ever My Dear Brother
                                                         most affectionately Yours
William Hamilton

Mews July 14th. 1764




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quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Moved annotation (ann1) here from top of p.2. It must postdate William Hamilton's knighthood in 1772.
 2. Moved annotation (ann2) here from top of p.2.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Sir William Hamilton to Charles Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/4/7/3

Correspondence Details

Author: Sir William Hamilton

Place sent: London (certainty: low)

Addressee: Charles Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 14 July 1764

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Sir William Hamilton to his brother Charles Hamilton. He writes that his brother Frederick has given him his share of the family china. He notes that if he had a few pieces more, it would save him having to purchase much more and asks Charles if he would send him what remains of his. In return he can have what remains, but if he has any objection, then not to send. It would save William about five hundred pounds if Charles was to do so, and he asks that he send it as soon as possible as he wishes to ship it to Naples [where he is taking up his position as Ambassador]. He also writes that the day before he kissed the King's hand and is now known as 'His Excellency'. Dated at Mews.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 213 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2013/14 provided by G.L. Brook bequest, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: George Bailey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Research assistant: Carla Seabra-Dacosta, MA student, University of Vigo

Transliterator: Daniel Whiteley, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: Chloe Bayode, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Transliterator: George Rowlands, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted December 2013)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 2 April 2020

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