Single Letter

HAM/1/5/2/15

Letter from Anne Murray to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


14
      from Miss A Murray

9.[1]

KenWood Janry: 6th: 1789


      I have waited for an opportunity
of getting a Frank My Dearest Madam, or
should not have been so many Days in
returning thanks for your kind Letter, &
expreʃsing my Joy at the good account
it contained of those most dear to you,
I am exceeding glad that Mr. Dickenson
has found a Remedy for his troublesome
complaint, & hope the Soap Pills will keep
off any return of it; I can easily con:
:ceive
your little Girl grows every Day more
& more amusing & engaging, Children of
understanding, are at her Age delightful
to all, how much more to their affectionate
Parents! who besides the Love & regard for
them, have constant opportunities of observing
all their little enchanting ways, & how wonderfully



their young Minds open. I am much Obliged
to you for your kind congratulations on our
dearest Elizth:'s recovery, which thank God was
to the satisfaction of all who attended her, &
as quick as could be wished, Anna Maria, for
that is the name of the youngest Child, I am
told is a very fine one, & thrives fast, sweet
Louisa is in perfect health, & chatters away
like your's. Towards the end of Octor: our dear
Ld Mansfield[2] was seized with a disorder in
his Stomach, which pulled him so much that
we began to dread the consequences, but to
our unspeakable Joy & amazement he is
better now than before that time, his Con:
:stitution
seems to have taken a turn, he
has left off Laudanum, & Sleeps well without
it, takes no Medicines of any sort, except
from time to time a small quantity of Rhubarb,
Eats very tolerably, has little or nothing of
those dreadful irritations, can enter into



conversation, & listen to reading, the only
difference for the worse is a degree of weakneʃs
in the Limbs which prevents his rising from
his Chair, or walking when up, without some
------aʃsistance he Dines alone, & has not yet help'd himself
from the great stiffneʃs of his arms; he has kept
constantly up Stairs in an apartment to the
South, & really has suffered as little from the
intense cold of this Winter, as any one in the
House, far leʃs than my poor Sister, who tho'
she never goes out, is seldom without pain
in Head or Stomach, thank God I hitherto brave
all Weather, & unleʃs when Snow is falling,
never miʃs a charming Walk in Wood or Garden.
      The Publick Calamity is too dreadful a Subject
to dwell upon, nor can any one think on the
private distreʃs it also occasions, without the
greatest commiseration for the unhappy
sufferers, the Politicks are too intricate for
my discernment, but I heartily joyn with you
in wishing the steps taken, may tend to the



good of the whole, for there we are all parties
concerned. I suppose Ly Stormont[3] would tell
you that her dear William has lately recover'd
from the Measles, which he had most favourably,
the other Boys are all well, & she is now enjoying
the Company of her beloved Mrs Graham at
Little Grove. Ly Cathcart[4] is pretty well, but in
distreʃs at present on account of her youngest
Sister, who is very ill at Dallington.
      I am much Obliged to you for a sight of the
inclosed, it is a curious Manuscript, & the
place belonging to Mr Ironmonger must by
your description be a very pretty one, so
extensive a Forrest, & so many beautiful Ridings
cannot fail of having a good effect.
      Adieu My Dearest Madam, I am charged
by Lord M. & my Sister to offer their best &
kindest wishes to you & Mr Dickenson, who I
hope will accept the same from me, & that you
will believe me, most sincerely,
                                                         & Affectionately Your's.
A: Murray

PS
Twenty kiʃses to your
sweet Girl.[5]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Moved annotation here from below dateline.
 2. William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield (1704/5-1793).
 3. Louisa Murray (née Cathcart), Viscountess of Stormont (c1758-1843), married to David Murray (1727-1796) and cousin of Mary Hamilton.
 4. Elizabeth Cathcart (née Elliot) (d. 1847), wife of Lieutenant-Colonel William Schaw Cathcart, 10th Lord Cathcart (1755-1843), Scottish soldier and diplomatist and cousin of Mary Hamilton.
 5. This postscript appears to the left of the closing salutation and signature.

Normalised Text



     


KenWood January 6th: 1789


      I have waited for an opportunity
of getting a Frank My Dearest Madam, or
should not have been so many Days in
returning thanks for your kind Letter, &
expressing my Joy at the good account
it contained of those most dear to you,
I am exceeding glad that Mr. Dickenson
has found a Remedy for his troublesome
complaint, & hope the Soap Pills will keep
off any return of it; I can easily conceive
your little Girl grows every Day more
& more amusing & engaging, Children of
understanding, are at her Age delightful
to all, how much more to their affectionate
Parents! who besides the Love & regard for
them, have constant opportunities of observing
all their little enchanting ways, & how wonderfully



their young Minds open. I am much Obliged
to you for your kind congratulations on our
dearest Elizabeth's recovery, which thank God was
to the satisfaction of all who attended her, &
as quick as could be wished, Anna Maria, for
that is the name of the youngest Child, I am
told is a very fine one, & thrives fast, sweet
Louisa is in perfect health, & chatters away
like your's. Towards the end of October our dear
Lord Mansfield was seized with a disorder in
his Stomach, which pulled him so much that
we began to dread the consequences, but to
our unspeakable Joy & amazement he is
better now than before that time, his Constitution
seems to have taken a turn, he
has left off Laudanum, & Sleeps well without
it, takes no Medicines of any sort, except
from time to time a small quantity of Rhubarb,
Eats very tolerably, has little or nothing of
those dreadful irritations, can enter into



conversation, & listen to reading, the only
difference for the worse is a degree of weakness
in the Limbs which prevents his rising from
his Chair, or walking when up, without some
assistance he Dines alone, & has not yet help'd himself
from the great stiffness of his arms; he has kept
constantly up Stairs in an apartment to the
South, & really has suffered as little from the
intense cold of this Winter, as any one in the
House, far less than my poor Sister, who though
she never goes out, is seldom without pain
in Head or Stomach, thank God I hitherto brave
all Weather, & unless when Snow is falling,
never miss a charming Walk in Wood or Garden.
      The Public Calamity is too dreadful a Subject
to dwell upon, nor can any one think on the
private distress it also occasions, without the
greatest commiseration for the unhappy
sufferers, the Politics are too intricate for
my discernment, but I heartily join with you
in wishing the steps taken, may tend to the



good of the whole, for there we are all parties
concerned. I suppose Lady Stormont would tell
you that her dear William has lately recover'd
from the Measles, which he had most favourably,
the other Boys are all well, & she is now enjoying
the Company of her beloved Mrs Graham at
Little Grove. Lady Cathcart is pretty well, but in
distress at present on account of her youngest
Sister, who is very ill at Dallington.
      I am much Obliged to you for a sight of the
enclosed, it is a curious Manuscript, & the
place belonging to Mr Ironmonger must by
your description be a very pretty one, so
extensive a Forest, & so many beautiful Ridings
cannot fail of having a good effect.
      Adieu My Dearest Madam, I am charged
by Lord Mansfield & my Sister to offer their best &
kindest wishes to you & Mr Dickenson, who I
hope will accept the same from me, & that you
will believe me, most sincerely,
                                                         & Affectionately Your's.
Anne Murray

PS
Twenty kisses to your
sweet Girl.

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Moved annotation here from below dateline.
 2. William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield (1704/5-1793).
 3. Louisa Murray (née Cathcart), Viscountess of Stormont (c1758-1843), married to David Murray (1727-1796) and cousin of Mary Hamilton.
 4. Elizabeth Cathcart (née Elliot) (d. 1847), wife of Lieutenant-Colonel William Schaw Cathcart, 10th Lord Cathcart (1755-1843), Scottish soldier and diplomatist and cousin of Mary Hamilton.
 5. This postscript appears to the left of the closing salutation and signature.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Anne Murray to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/5/2/15

Correspondence Details

Author: Anne Murray

Place sent: Kenwood

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 6 January 1789

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Anne Murray to Mary Hamilton, concerning news of family and acquaintances. Murray is happy to hear that Mr Dickenson has found a 'Remedy for his troublesome complaint' and hopes that the soap pills will prevent its return. The letter goes on to describe the various illnesses of other relations, including her sister and Lord Mansfield. The letter makes reference to a 'Publick Calamity', and it being 'too dreadful a Subject to dwell upon'. [She writes this in reply to a letter Hamilton had sent her, not included in the archive. It may well relate to the King's ill-health in late October 1788 and the ensuing Regency Crisis.] Murray notes that the politics are too intricate for her discernment but hopes, as does Hamilton, that it will be resolved for the good of all. The letter concludes with Murray's thanks to Hamilton for sending her a manuscript.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 647 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2014/15 and 2015/16 provided by the Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Donald Alasdair Morrison, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Laura Proctor, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted November 2014)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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