Single Letter

HAM/1/5/4/15

Note from Lord Warwick to John Dickenson

Diplomatic Text


------ Lodge
Octr. 27th. 1811


Dear Dickenson

      Will you if you can
forgive me for delaying so long
to thank you for your obliging
acquiescence in my request I most
sincerely hope & I believe that
you will have no trouble in ye
busineʃs more than you expect
      I wish I could say mine was
at an End it rather increases
if poʃsible & what is worse ye
prospect of relief is at hand
                                                         almost



but still just out of reach
Patience does much but some-
times comes too late & at
my time of life I have no
time to lose. I have had the
satisfaction of late that is to
know that our House can
stand in its elevated situation
any storm we have had a
Specimen of all the Collection
in Aeoluss[1] poʃseʃsion, & we
are not blown out like



some birds Nests in our Neighbd
& which we much resemble
I always liked our Holly bush
I should be ungrateful indeed
If I did not respect the most
ample shield against storms
& the beauty in fine Weathers
      Pray make my kind Comps
to
Mrs. Dickenson & your
Daughter I hope the series
of amusing & edifying rambles
will be renewed ------



amiable & instructive amusement
cannot be devised[2] & long may you
live to enjoy it is the sincere wish
of Dear Dickenson your
faithful friend &c
Warwick

J. Dickenson Esqr

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Aeolus, Greek god of wind.
 2. This sentence has not yet yielded a satisfactory reading.

Normalised Text


------ Lodge
October 27th. 1811


Dear Dickenson

      Will you if you can
forgive me for delaying so long
to thank you for your obliging
acquiescence in my request I most
sincerely hope & I believe that
you will have no trouble in the
business more than you expect
      I wish I could say mine was
at an End it rather increases
if possible & what is worse the
prospect of relief is at hand
                                                         almost



but still just out of reach
Patience does much but some-
times comes too late & at
my time of life I have no
time to lose. I have had the
satisfaction of late that is to
know that our House can
stand in its elevated situation
any storm we have had a
Specimen of all the Collection
in Aeoluss possession, & we
are not blown out like



some birds Nests in our Neighbourhood
& which we much resemble
I always liked our Holly bush
I should be ungrateful indeed
If I did not respect the most
ample shield against storms
& the beauty in fine Weathers
      Pray make my kind Compliments
to
Mrs. Dickenson & your
Daughter I hope the series
of amusing & edifying rambles
will be renewed ------



amiable & instructive amusement
cannot be devised & long may you
live to enjoy it is the sincere wish
of Dear Dickenson your
faithful friend &c
Warwick

John Dickenson Esquire

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Aeolus, Greek god of wind.
 2. This sentence has not yet yielded a satisfactory reading.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Note from Lord Warwick to John Dickenson

Shelfmark: HAM/1/5/4/15

Correspondence Details

Author: 2nd Earl of Warwick, George Greville

Place sent: Warwick (certainty: low)

Addressee: John Dickenson

Place received: London (certainty: low)

Date sent: 27 October 1811

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Lord Warwick to John Dickenson, conveying general news. He discusses recent difficulties: the 'prospect of relief is at hand almost but still just out of reach. Patience does much but sometimes comes too late & at my time of life I have no time to lose.' However, his house has withstood recent storms: 'we have had a Specimen of all the Collection in Aeolus[']s possession, & we are not blown out like some birds Nests in our Neighb[ourhoo]d.'
   

Length: 1 sheet, 234 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2014/15 and 2015/16 provided by the Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Donald Alasdair Morrison, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Lauren Thomas, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted November 2014)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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