Single Letter

HAM/1/6/4/3

Letter from Elizabeth Montagu to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


Dear Madam

Oct 28th 1788


      I had been murmuring at my cold, ever
since you left Sandleford, for having deprived me of an hour or
two of yours & Mr Dickensons company till this morning brought
me the best amends for my loʃs, the favour of your obliging letter.
My churlish cold kept me in bed the day you departed, by
which I also lost the pleasure of seeing the Bishop of Salisbury &
Mrs Barrington, who had the goodneʃs to call for an hour in
their way to Mongewell. After three or four days confinement
I am now well enough to take the air in my chaise, & in
some shelterd place to get a walk. These little excursions are
very delightfull at all seasons of the year, but particularly



at this. The Seasons have all performd their labours, & all things
seem subsiding into gentle peace, & sweet tranquillity, & the
Robin red breast chaunts the Vespers of the year. My time
of life, now falling into the sere & yellow leaf
,[1] perhaps makes me
sympathise more with the tranquillity of Autumn, than the
gayity of Spring, & the gaudy pomp, & splender of summer,
& its bustling labours.
I hope my dear Madam your & Mr Dickensons next visit to
Sandleford will not be so short, & my Grandson Edward will in
another year pay due homage to the rosy cheeks & dimpled smile
of pretty Miʃs Dickenson. His Parents beg you to accept to present
their best respects, & present them to Mr Dickenson, to whom
I hope you will offer mine, & so give ye little Ladys rosy
cheek a kiʃs for me.
My cold has left such a weakneʃs in my eyes, as fortunately
for you, prevents my troubling you with a longer letter.
With sincere esteem
                             I am Dear Madam
                             your most affectionate
                                                         & Obliged Humble Servant
Eliz Montagu


May I take the liberty
to desire my best compts to Lady Wake?[2]




Newbury. October the twenty eighth
                                                         1788[3] [4]

Mrs. Dickenson
at Lady Wake's
Courteen Hall
M free Montagu. Near Northampton

Mrs Montagu
Octer. 28 -- 1788
[5]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. An allusion to Macbeth V.iii.
 2. These two lines appear at the bottom left of page 2 to the left of the salutation.
 3. Postmarks 'OC 29 88' above address panel, 'FREE 5' over address.
 4. This line and the following address appear to be written in an unknown hand.
 5. Moved annotation here from left side of p.3 when unfolded, written vertically.

Normalised Text


Dear Madam

October 28th 1788


      I had been murmuring at my cold, ever
since you left Sandleford, for having deprived me of an hour or
two of yours & Mr Dickensons company till this morning brought
me the best amends for my loss, the favour of your obliging letter.
My churlish cold kept me in bed the day you departed, by
which I also lost the pleasure of seeing the Bishop of Salisbury &
Mrs Barrington, who had the goodness to call for an hour in
their way to Mongewell. After three or four days confinement
I am now well enough to take the air in my chaise, & in
some sheltered place to get a walk. These little excursions are
very delightful at all seasons of the year, but particularly



at this. The Seasons have all performed their labours, & all things
seem subsiding into gentle peace, & sweet tranquillity, & the
Robin red breast chants the Vespers of the year. My time
of life, now falling into the sere & yellow leaf
, perhaps makes me
sympathise more with the tranquillity of Autumn, than the
gayity of Spring, & the gaudy pomp, & splendor of summer,
& its bustling labours.
I hope my dear Madam your & Mr Dickensons next visit to
Sandleford will not be so short, & my Grandson Edward will in
another year pay due homage to the rosy cheeks & dimpled smile
of pretty Miss Dickenson. His Parents beg you to accept
their best respects, & present them to Mr Dickenson, to whom
I hope you will offer mine, & give the little Ladys rosy
cheek a kiss for me.
My cold has left such a weakness in my eyes, as fortunately
for you, prevents my troubling you with a longer letter.
With sincere esteem
                             I am Dear Madam
                             your most affectionate
                                                         & Obliged Humble Servant
Elizabeth Montagu


May I take the liberty
to desire my best compliments to Lady Wake?




Newbury. October the twenty eighth
                                                         1788

Mrs. Dickenson
at Lady Wake's
Courteen Hall
M free Montagu. Near Northampton

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. An allusion to Macbeth V.iii.
 2. These two lines appear at the bottom left of page 2 to the left of the salutation.
 3. Postmarks 'OC 29 88' above address panel, 'FREE 5' over address.
 4. This line and the following address appear to be written in an unknown hand.
 5. Moved annotation here from left side of p.3 when unfolded, written vertically.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Elizabeth Montagu to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/6/4/3

Correspondence Details

Author: Elizabeth Montagu (née Robinson)

Place sent: Sandleford, near Newbury

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: Courteenhall, near Northampton

Date sent: 28 October 1788

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Elizabeth Montagu to Mary Hamilton. Montagu's cold had 'deprived me of an hour or two of yours & Mr Dickensons company', and the day they left Sandleford she had also missed seeing the Bishop of Salisbury and Mrs Barrington when they came to call. She reports that she is now able to take the air in her chaise and at times by walking, and she expresses her love of nature.
    Dated at Newbury.
    Original reference No. 2.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 344 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2016/17 provided by The John Rylands Research Institute.

Research assistant: Isabella Formisano, former MA student, University of Manchester

Research assistant: Carla Seabra-Dacosta, MA student, University of Vigo

Transliterator: Andrew Gott, dissertation student, University of Manchester (submitted June 2012)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 17 April 2020

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